Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz Eyeshadow Palette Review & Swatches

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Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette

Imperial Topaz

Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz The Luxury Eye Palette ($55.00 for 0.57 oz.) includes six shades housed in a glossy, black palette with a mirror. There are three shimmery shades, one sparkly shade, and two matte shades. It’s a warmer-toned neutral palette with a cooler-toned black. I’ve always maintained that you never know when someone is in the market for the perfect [insert color story here] palette so what’s boring to one is exciting to another… and as long as it’s high quality, I’m happy to have more variety. The palette was decent, but it wasn’t as blendable or as foolproof to work with as marketed, and as there are a ton of warm neutral palettes available, there are so many others I’d reach for over this.

I’m a fan of the brand’s brushes, and I think the brand did a great job of bringing Japanese brushes into the more mainstream with a more streamlined range of accessible shapes/sizes at a decent price point, so I definitely wasn’t expecting to be left disappointed with this release. I was expecting really soft, smooth, and blendable eyeshadows with more ethereal shimmers–seamless, almost melted for a luminous sheen–and foolproof, ultra-blendable matte shades–and those were my takeaways from the description at the point of sale as well as the announcement video.

The first two shimmers felt almost spongy–soft–but they were more frosted than seamless as anticipated based on the brand’s marketing. The matte shades could have been more blendable, while the sparkly shade had a fair amount of fallout (even when used with a fingertip). One of the shimmers was a bit thinner and sheerer, so it was harder to build up. They lasted decently on my eye (about eight hours). The shades, except the black shade, coordinated well together, but the first and sixth shade are very similar in color (different in finish), and the palette would be more versatile if they overlapped less.

The palette contains larger-than-average quantities of each shade (almost 0.10 oz. whereas most eyeshadows are 0.05 oz. when sold individually or 0.03 to 0.04 oz. in a larger palette). The reasoning given for this was because smaller eyeshadows are harder to get one’s brush in, but I’ve not had that issue with most eyeshadow pans in the 0.03 oz. (Urban Decay Naked palette pans for reference) to 0.05 oz. size (that’s a MAC or Urban Decay single eyeshadow for reference). I think when you get to more dime-sized shades it can be a problem if they’re placed close together.

The second reasoning was this way you won’t see an “ugly well” or see the pan that emerges from repeated use of the product, which was a head-scratcher. Most of us are purchasing makeup to actually use it, and makeup is a consumable item–there is a shelf life!–and the industry has made some movements into going mini and travel-sized to drop prices. Nevertheless, if you do use these eyeshadows daily, why would you… not get a dip or a well or eventually see pan? It does not go on forever!

Per the brand, every palette in the future will contain the same black eyeshadow. I think this made for an interesting discussion (we had one on the Temptalia Discord when it was announced earlier, and I’ve seen it discussed by readers here as well as on my social media platforms). A great matte, black eyeshadow is a great tool to have in the arsenal, but I don’t know if you’ve ever tried to finish a single eyeshadow… but it takes some dedication. It still took me over a year to get through a single eyeshadow that was only 0.05 oz. that I used to fill in my brows almost daily.

If the format had more shades, I could see the inclusion of a standard black eyeshadow making more sense, but I think in a palette of six, the black eyeshadow adds a lot of contrast in undertone and depth that actually makes it harder to incorporate it and keep the look warmer and browner as the other five shades suggest. It would have made a lot more sense to include a deeper shade in each color story but to coordinate it with the other shades; in this palette, a really deep red-brown or almost burgundy could have gone a long way.

Alternatively, the black eyeshadow could be the seventh shade arranged in a long, narrow pan that went along the right edge (spanning two shades), which would lend itself to lining (which is one technique advocated) as well as building up or darkening shades (where you’d likely use smaller, more precise brushes). Guerlain did something like this previously.

I’ll also say that it’s just a so-so black eyeshadow for something that is mega-sized and intended to be included in every palette. I liked that it wasn’t powdery–it was firmer and thinner compared to the other matte shades in the palette–so there wasn’t fallout to worry about, and it was easier to pick up less to build up. The issue was that it wasn’t very blendable, and the shade skipped when applied. It was a lot easier to layer the matte brown eyeshadow over the black to get a softer, more diffused edge.

Also, I noted that the brand stated these should not be used wet–you don’t normally see that warning/recommendation, so I thought I’d pass that along!

Ingredients

Imperial Topaz

PPermanent. $55.00.
B
B
8
Product
9
Pigmentation
8
Texture
8
Longevity
4.5
Application
83%
Total
We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!
1 of 2
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #1 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #1

Imperial Topaz #1 is a light, peachy gold with strong, warm undertones and a frosted sheen. It had good pigmentation in a single layer with a soft, almost spongy texture–there was a bit of spring to it but no creaminess like a true cream eyeshadow–that picked up well with a dry brush and had good adherence to bare skin. I didn’t have any issues diffusing or blending it out, though it seemed to have a slightly whiter base that came through as I applied it. This shade lasted well for eight hours before fading noticeably.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Mica, Talc, Dimethicone, Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate, Zea Mays (corn) Starch [zea Mays Starch], Zinc Stearate, Isopropyl Isostearate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Chlorphenesin, Potassium Sorbate, Tetrasodium Edta, Silica. May Contain : Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77491, Ci 77492, Ci 77499), Yellow 5 Lake (ci 19140), Ultramarines (ci 77007).

Imperial Topaz #1

PiPPermanent in Palette.
A-
A-
9
Product
10
Pigmentation
9
Texture
8.5
Longevity
5
Application
92%
Total
1 of 2
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #2 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #2

Imperial Topaz #2 is a light-medium brown with moderate, warm undertones and a frosted finish. The consistency was soft, blendable, and had a slight spring to it (like #1) that felt finely-milled without being powdery nor too firmly packed into the pan. It had opaque color payoff that applied evenly to bare skin. The color stayed on nicely for eight hours before fading visibly.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Mica, Talc, Dimethicone, Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate, Zea Mays (corn) Starch [zea Mays Starch], Zinc Stearate, Isopropyl Isostearate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Chlorphenesin, Potassium Sorbate, Tetrasodium Edta, Silica. May Contain : Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77491, Ci 77492, Ci 77499), Yellow 5 Lake (ci 19140), Ultramarines (ci 77007).

Imperial Topaz #2

PiPPermanent in Palette.
A-
A-
9
Product
10
Pigmentation
9
Texture
8.5
Longevity
5
Application
92%
Total
We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!
1 of 2
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #3 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #3

Imperial Topaz #3 is a deep black with cool undertones and a matte finish. It was drier, thinner, and stiff to work with, which made blending more challenging, and the last thing I expected was a fussy formula given that this is a shade the brand said would be included in every palette they ever release. It had medium to semi-opaque coverage in one layer and could be built up to full coverage with two to three layers.

It emphasized my skin texture when worn on its own, and I found I had to re-apply and layer the lighter matte brown shades (#5) over it to really get a soft, diffused edge and minimize the ragged appearance of the edge where it was applied. There was visible fading after seven and a half hours of wear.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Talc, Zinc Stearate, Mica, Silica, Dimethicone, Triethoxycaprylylsilane, Boron Nitride, Caprylyl Glycol, Potassium Sorbate, Chlorphenesin, Tetrasodium Edta, Calcium Sodium Borosilicate, Tin Oxide, Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77499), Black 2 (ci 77266) [nano].

Imperial Topaz #3

PiPPermanent in Palette.
D+
D+
6
Product
7.5
Pigmentation
6.5
Texture
8
Longevity
3
Application
69%
Total
1 of 2
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #4 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #4

Imperial Topaz #4 is a medium, coppery orange with strong, warm undertones and soft shimmer running through it. It had more of a satin finish in the base color, but there were larger shimmers that had light fallout during application. It had more semi-sheer to medium coverage applied as it was prone to sheering out. The texture was soft but not as finely-milled as the first two shimmer shades (and this one didn’t feel springy to the touch either). It showed signs of fading after seven and a half hours of wear.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Mica, Talc, Dimethicone, Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate, Zea Mays (corn) Starch [zea Mays Starch], Zinc Stearate, Isopropyl Isostearate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Chlorphenesin, Potassium Sorbate, Tetrasodium Edta, Silica. May Contain: Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77491, Ci 77492, Ci 77499), Yellow 5 Lake (ci 19140), Ultramarines (ci 77007).

Imperial Topaz #4

PiPPermanent in Palette.
C+
C+
7
Product
7.5
Pigmentation
7.5
Texture
8
Longevity
4.5
Application
77%
Total
We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!
1 of 2
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #5 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #5

Imperial Topaz #5 is a light-medium brown with moderate, warm undertones and a matte finish. The eyeshadow had nearly opaque color coverage in a single layer, which applied evenly to bare skin and blended out fairly well. I noticed that it was more prone to darkening a bit, so I would recommend wearing it over a primer or powdered base; it became less blendable if there was any natural oil/tackiness present but was fairly blendable overall. It wore decently for eight hours on me before fading noticeably.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Talc, Zea Mays (corn) Starch [zea Mays Starch], Mica, Zinc Stearate, Dimethicone, Isopropyl Isostearate, Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Chlorphenesin, Potassium Sorbate, Tetrasodium Edta. May Contain: Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77491, Ci 77492, Ci 77499), Ultramarines (ci 77007), Carmine (ci 75470).

Imperial Topaz #5

PiPPermanent in Palette.
B+
B+
8.5
Product
9.5
Pigmentation
8.5
Texture
8.5
Longevity
4.5
Application
88%
Total
1 of 3
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow
Wayne Goss Imperial Topaz #6 Luxury Eyeshadow

Imperial Topaz #6

Imperial Topaz #6 is a light peach with strong, warm undertones and a sparkling finish. The texture was moderately dense, not too thick or too thin, but it wasn’t as emollient as it could have been, which resulted in more fallout during application. It seemed to have more semi-opaque coverage, but the base blended in more with my skin tone, so it may be harder to determine from the swatch without me saying as much.

Per the brand, it is best applied with fingertips, but there was still some fallout when I did so. I’d normally recommend to use it with a dampened brush, but the description said to use the eyeshadows dry only. The effect was sparkling with a bit of a sheen, but there was additional fallout over time, so the effect dimmed as the fallout occurred. The longevity seemed around seven hours or so with visible fallout.

FURTHER READING: Formula Overview for details on general performance and characteristics (like scent).

Formula Overview

-

The eyeshadow formula is supposed to "blend with the lightest touch--no special techniques needed" that have a "silky feel." The brand recommended that the eyeshadow formula be used "dry only" and the sparkly shades be "patted onto the lid with your finger." In the point of sale description, there was nothing that mentioned pigmentation, but all promotional swatches show really intense coverage (almost running deeper, too, than they appear in pans).

There aren't too many shades released at this time, but the performance depended on the finish. I had good luck with two shimmer shades--pigmented, blendable, long-wearing--while one was drier, sheerer, and harder to build up. The matte black eyeshadow (which the brand said would be included in each palette going forward) was stiffer and drier, which made it harder to blend out, while the other matte eyeshadow available was more blendable but definitely not blended with "the lightest touch." The mattes lasted around eight hours on me on average.

Browse all of our Wayne Goss Luxury Eyeshadow swatches.

Ingredients

Calcium Sodium Borosilicate, Talc, Diisostearyl Malate, Caprylic/capric Triglyceride, Mica, Hydrogenated Castor Oil Hydroxystearate, Soybean Glycerides, 1,2-hexanediol, Caprylyl Glycol, Butyrospermum Parkii (shea) Butter Unsaponifiables [butyrospermum Parkii Butter Unsaponifiables], Chlorphenesin, Potassium Sorbate, Tetrasodium Edta, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Citric Acid, Tin Oxide. May Contain: Titanium Dioxide (ci 77891), Iron Oxides (ci 77491, Ci 77492, Ci 77499), Ultramarines (ci 77007), Ferric Ferrocyanide (ci 77510), Yellow 5 Lake (ci 19140), Blue 1 Lake (ci 42090).

Imperial Topaz #6

PiPPermanent in Palette.
C
C
7.5
Product
8.5
Pigmentation
7
Texture
6.5
Longevity
4.5
Application
76%
Total
We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!
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43 Comments

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In the end Wayne created a palette for himself, and we all have our preferences. His view on makeup is quite unique in the industry and that might make his products less commercial, but I am happy for him that he was able to create the makeup he wants, not what the market wants.

The large pans are mostly useful for make-up artists. Unless an eyeshadow is very powdery and one has a very heavy hand, it’s hard to pan eyeshadow. I only work with a custom made 15 eyeshadows palette and still only hit pan before replacing (2-3 years) on the transition shades or something I use often all over the lid like a Satin Taupe. But maybe I am a very light handed eyeshadow applicator. 😅

I understand that some people have extensive collections and can easily dupe this palette, but others are just starting makeup or like to have a small collection of staples. I could totally see a friend of mine who only does neutral shades and uses black eyeshadow to define the lashline everyday liking this.
So I like Christine that you open the conversation about people having different needs and preferences. Reviewers and make-up lovers forget that not everybody has 10+ palettes, nor wants to own so many even if they afford. So “easily dupable” is not always a good argument.

I was considering this one but it just doesn’t look very consistent. Def doesn’t look like its worth the price either. I love Wayne Goss though!

Thank you, Christine, for another comprehensive and in-depth review! And so timely, too! I was surprised to see last night that it was still available given how fast his lip products sold out, but I haven’t checked today. I had a feeling this was not the one for me and I feel validated after reading your review. Holy cow, do I have every neutral shade of eyeshadow ever, or so it feels like. So there was nothing special about this palette, apart from the name on the packaging. I love his brushes, and the lipsticks are okay (they all lean a bit on the peach side for my taste). It was hard not to get excited while watching the reveal video because he has such great contagious energy, but I was not as enthused about the palette as he was and that told me something.

I watched a few Youtube videos and I saw the performance of the shadows and scratched my head. Why was everyone praising it when the colors seem muted and barely there? Something about the effect of the color payoff looked dated. I know he is well-loved and I’m happy that he have realized his vision for his brand but at the end of the day, its still a business and a product. Thanks for giving a highly analytical review, it really helps.

The best I saw was someone talking about how good the eyeliners were while looking directly at the large eyeliner floaty clearly visible in thier eye. Everyone loves Wayne I guess?

Ok now I really want to see who is going to be the first person on YT honest enough to give this palette a mediocre review, or even less-than-glowing review. I’m really curious to see if anyone is willing to do it.

I agree with you, Christine, it would make a lot more sense for each palette to include a dark matte which coordinates with the rest of the palette — whether a warm black, cool black, deep grey, cool brown, warm brown… etc etc. I mean, frequently people point out the prevalence of gold in Pat McGrath’s palettes and that’s usually at least a different shade of gold!

Also if you’re going to include the same color in every palette, you need to make sure it’s an A+ color. I feel like I have much better matte blacks in much less expensive palettes.

It would make it easier to use, too, which I think was more the type of product it was intended to be? But it would be easier to blend these shades into a darker, but warm-toned, brown shade. Working with a pure black eyeshadow can take some practice!

Even if you don’t wish to purchase a palette, because it is not your color story, you understand that new eyeshadow fiends are ripening all the time. Yes, those persons are likely to start with a warm neutral palette including a liner definer and browbone shade. This color selection lends itself well to the ‘contour the eye’ school of m/u app. And I think that’s what WG was going for. Frankly, I would think that the newbies would start with CP, due to the price point, accessibility, and the ability to build a stash quickly. This is not expensive by cosmetic world standards, and it could have become a classic workhorse, were it better. I expected far greater quality. Think I’ll stick to brushes, as his initial shade choices do not appeal, and the quality, for Wayne, is subpar.

I totally agree with you and other readers on Discord, we do NOT need the same black eyeshadow in Every. Single. Palette.
Would rather have seen a deep brown like MAC Handwritten instead. Rich, deep warm taupe.
Beyond this, I just feel like most of us who have moderate or larger sized stashes of eyeshadow just don’t need these shades. We likely own them already. I was really hoping for something a little more exciting.

The ‘you won’t see an “ugly well” or see the pan that emerges from repeated use of the product, ‘ makes me laugh, since for exaple an entire sub reddit dedicated to the hitting-the-pan exist 🤣! Actually, It’s a high satisfaction for me when the pan emerges from a shades. It means than I made good use of the product and that the money had been well invested! Besides the way usually it taks me about a couple of day of use to hit the pan in the most used shades (usually transition matte and white or creams) so I perfectly okay with regular sizes.

It reminds me of the scene in Mean Girls, when Cady learns all the ways in which girls put themselves down. Like I didn’t know this was a problem?!

I didn’t watch his video as the only eyeshadows i buy these day’s are single pans i can build in my own palette. I find that to be the strangest comment?! It’s almost as if it was more of reply to justify reasoning for larger pans = higher price point. I do think this is more targeted for makeup artists. Even a person who prefers 1 palette would find this hard to go through.

I was expecting something really blendable and soft! I thought it might be powdery (to be blendable/easy to work with) or sheer (but buildable)!

If this same black shade will be in subsequent palettes, I hope they reformulate it…I think even Maybelline’s Nudes of New York is a lot better than this palette and at a fraction of the price. At this price point every shade should be close to perfect. Colourpop’s Going Coconuts is a staple for me and it’s super blendable and beautiful.

This is a nope from me. I love sheerer, buildable shadows since I am older and they are more flattering than super-opaque ones on my crepey eyelids, but the key is they *have* to be blendable, and preferably luminous and glowing, not frosty with fallout. I can get these results from something like the Beauty Bakerie Breakfast in Bed palette for a fraction of the price.

Thanks for the (always) honest and detailed review. I’m very surprised 3 out of the 6 shades scored as low as they did. I was on the fence, leaning away from this palette from the start, but I did expect it to be in the A range given the hype and Wayne’s past record of quality in his brush collections. It also does not make any sense to me, if this is meant to be an easy to use fool proof palette, that he would expect people to achieve depth by blending the other shades with black…not only will black make the warm colours ashy and muddy, it’s just straight up going to take a lot more work to make transitions seamless.

If this had gotten an A review I think I would eventually pick it up, even with my extensive neutral palette collection. But now I’m not really interested anymore? I also feel like this can totally be duped out by Viseart shadows.

I agree, J — black can be really hard to incorporate as a darkening shade and a darker brown would have been easier (for all skill levels)! I, too, expected it to be a higher quality product!

I don’t wear warm tones so this wasn’t the palette for me but I was confused by a few parts of his launch video. Hearing why a black shadow is to be included in every palette the brand creates makes me think that Wayne created this palette for himself, rather than for consumers. It seems like he didn’t do much market research as consumers have repeatedly said that black is their least used shadow so, by adding it to every palette, he turned a 6 pan product into a 5 pan one. Also, having larger pan size to eliminate the well created by use is unnecessary as this is not an issue people complain about and it just sounded like an attempt to make a standard warm neutral palette seem innovative. I’m pretty surprised that the shadows didn’t perform well but I’m glad now that this wasn’t my color story!

I can understand how there would be those who would appreciate a small neutral palette, but this one is not the one to choose, unfortunately, for the excellent reasons you have stated above. The quality and shade choices (too many similarities in a small palette) are just not justifiable for the price.

Ouch on the black shade, I love a good black shade in a palette and I want it to be the blackest black and I agree with Wayne it can do so much more than any other shade. I’m always on the hunt for the blackest black smoothest black shade and was really hoping this would be it, sadly looks like it’s not going back to Urban Decay blackout.

Definitely saved me a purchase although tbh I’m not sure what I was expecting from Wayne Goss as far as eyeshadow goes. This feels on-brand to him, but I’m not sure why we should have a black eyeshadow.

Btw, how can we get into the discord? I’d love to join because I don’t feel like I have anyone to discuss makeup with, but the last link (2017 in the search) is non-existent.

Unrelated, but I’m a doofus and can’t find it if its somewhere on here, but WHAT mascara are you using?!? Its beautiful on you!

I understand this palette neutral for many peoplel. For me it leans way to warm. There are so many palettes coming out with those orange tan tones (or yellow for that matter), and if they are high end, I won’t buy if there are colours I won’t use.
I’ll stick to my Viseart shadows and Hourglass eyeliner for now 😉

I was so excited to learn Wayne had a palette launch as I really enjoy him and his content… my initial excitement was replaced with disappointment when I saw the actual palette. I’m going to assume this palette was created for busy makeup artists who use up a lot of the same eyeshadow colors, or pragmatic people who only buy one palette and use it up before getting another. True makeup enthusiasts will already have these colors at home and speaking for myself, I hate large pans of eyeshadow. I like to experiment and usually get bored of a palette before panning it. This palette with its extra big pans is just a waste of money for me. If someone is just getting into makeup I would definitely not recommend huge pans like this as you haven’t developed your own tastes/preferences yet.
I have some teeny tiny palettes at home like the lovely Viseart édits and Natasha Denona minis, and I have no problem getting my brushes into them; I think that reasoning is laughable. Natasha Denona was one of the first to size down her products and I think it’s a genius move.

I watched Mel Thompson’s review video where she goes on and on about how much product you get and I was like girl bye I don’t want those huge-ass pans of boring colors lol. I was underwhelmed with the looks she created with the palette, they were muddy at best.

Wow, I was surprised the black did so poorly. I saw a couple videos where it seemed very rich and blendable. Those were over primer and by pro MUAs, though. They had a bit of trouble with that sparkly shade as well, though it did look really pretty once it was on.

I know this is marketed to consumers, but this does seem like a more pro MUA palette to me. I’m sure there are consumers in the market who would love it as their everyday, workhorse palette. It’s not for me, though.

Black shadows: Not my favorite, because I don’t think big doses of black look good on my deep set eyes. Even if I had no neutral palettes, the big pan of black would keep me from buying this and Wayne’s future palettes. I’ve heard Stephanie Lange and many others YouTubers say every palette should have a matte black for smoking out looks. For my own purposes, I prefer a dark brown, charcoal gray, deep plum, or burgundy.

I tried it over primer (the whole look), but it wasn’t… really that different? The tendency for the brown shade not to stick was less so it was more blendable but didn’t help the black eyeshadow much!

I hope I didn’t sound like I was implying you didn’t do anything right or didn’t know what you were doing. I think the exact opposite.

Thanks for letting me know that primer didn’t help much. What a strange formula.

I’m not a fan of reddy-pink browns – they’re hugely unflattering on my skin tone – or lackluster blacks. So I’ll be passing. But I did want to say that these “boring” palettes still appeal to me. I don’t know about everyone else but I’ve always had this “find the perfect travel palette and you’ll feel complete in life” drive and so far have yet to find it. It’s definitely a holy grail quest.

I want a matte black, a deep cool matte brown, a midtone NON-PINK matte brown/browny-grey, something pale enough to be a highlight for my skintone (preferably a satin, or maybe a shimmer and a matte), and a few interesting colors thrown in the mix as well. Sultry is pretty good, but Anastasia’s formula is so crumbly/powdery that even though I’ve used it only a dozen times one of the shades has a deep, deep dip in it.

Somebody get on it.

“I want a matte black, a deep cool matte brown, a midtone NON-PINK matte brown/browny-grey, something pale enough to be a highlight for my skintone (preferably a satin, or maybe a shimmer and a matte), and a few interesting colors thrown in the mix as well.”

Omg! Sounds practically perfect. It’s gonna be like hitting the lottery to get not only the right shades, matte/shimmer ratio & formula ALL in one palette….lol
While I love the concept/idea/color story of Sultry, the ABH formula isn’t my favorite. I found the darkest brown really hard to work with, it didn’t blend well. Where I placed my brush initially is where the product wanted to remain…it just wouldn’t diffuse nicely.

I love your site and read your reviews often. I normally take your opinion into account when I’m thinking of purchasing something but I’m glad I didn’t this time. These are beautiful shadows and I’m happy I have them.
They are targeted toward 40+ women. Eyeshadows that are too pigmented are difficult to blend on mature eyelids. They need to be buildable. They are formulated this way intentionally. You will not find the creamy metallic or super pigmented black here because that’s not the purpose of this palette. Soft light and smudgy black and a pop of shimmer. Think Jennifer Aniston and Helen Mirren rather than Zendaya and Kristen Stewart.
I also don’t think most eyeshadows are formulated for you to blend 6-7 shades into every eyeshadow look. It ends up looking like a muddy wreck even with your highest rated eyeshadows.
If anyone in the targeted demographic is reading the comments and contemplating purchasing this palette, I think you’ll be very happy with it.

As always, the product is reviewed based on the claims (or lack of) made by the brand – it is completely misleading to show super saturated, intense swatches if everything is sheer and buildable, you know? Similarly, it was described as something that could be blended with the “lightest touch,” and I didn’t find that to be true of the black eyeshadow at all. If a brand wants to make 3 of 6 eyeshadows opaque (as in this case) and three that are not… they should make that very clear to the customer at the point of purchase.

The shade that was rated the poorest was because it wasn’t blendable – if you experienced that the black eyeshadow as blendable, it would be great to hear that specifically since I had blending issues only with two shades (one with more minor issues and one with major issues). On the flipside, the matte brown was very pigmented but fairly blendable (but not without minor issues)! Funny enough, I would describe the palette as more pigmented than not, and if I was rating on the shades being buildable and blendable, it actually would have rated significantly worse!

The swatches provided in the announcement video showed all of the shades as opaque and there was nothing on Beautylish’s page that said they were sheer or buildable. I have fine lines/light texture on my lids, and the frosted nature of the shimmers was not as flattering as it could be – I did not criticize nor rate the palette lower for lack of metallic finishes. Brands like Surratt, Chanel, etc. have more refined shimmers that add glow without any texture/visible shimmer particles.

I don’t find problems using several eyeshadows in a look – two or three on the lid, plus a crease and transition shade and then a brow bone or inner corner highlight easily takes it to six or seven, which I don’t think is excessive. I didn’t feel like the look came out as a “muddy wreck” (nor do I feel that way about most of my looks!) from this palette, though… it was just a lot of effort to get there for a product that’s positioned to be pretty effortless.

Nice to hear your thoughts too, Amanda in this choir of a bit overly emotional responses and scrutiny towards Wayne Goss first drop of an eyeshadow palette… 🙄 I don’t think I have ever seen even Christine make such an in depth job at her review as with this palette that comes from one of the worlds smallest brands, made by a person who funds it with his own money…

Sometimes I think internet and YouTube can destroy a bit of the fun with makeup as it promotes this obsessive hunt for the most excellent of everything which nothing can be really when it comes to makeup. Why? Since most people don’t actually like the same things! What one person loves another hates, and that in itself is a sign that the emotions run a bit too high to begin with as words like love and hate really seem a bit too strong for any makeup product to deserve… really…

And a problem becomes that when the hoard start to scream that a palette is baaaad that makes it then harder for the ones who might actually like it and even love it to dare to do so… And what is then really the point of that? When most people do not like the same things to begin with?

I believe (I am still waiting for mine to arrive since I live in Europe and not the US) this is a palette people who have followed Wayne for a long time and especially from before he became the “brush guy“ to the world, will find to be pretty much a realisation of all the things that he has “preached” in his tutorials over quite a few years on his channel about makeup for the not so very savvy but willing to learn more about the MUA techniques but for dummies kind of crowd. I think for people who have learned about Wayne since he became the “brush guy” the expectations perhaps may run a bit too high… He is just beginning to dip his toes into making makeup and for everybody who have ever tried to build up something from scratch by yourself – that is a hard thing to do!! Most makeup-brands do not start that way! They start by getting funding from somewhere or by being owned by someone else. Wayne is doing it the old fashioned way. And that means it will take time to build up and to have the expectation that it will be complete excellence right off the bat seems honestly a bit too high of an expectation to have…?

In that sense it seems it has both been a blessing to Wayne as well as a curse that his brush collections happened to hit a lot bigger than he had probably ever anticipated right from the start. Pretty much because he happened to launch his brushes right at the perfect moment when the market was ready for the big brush revolution that we are still in now… I am quite sure he did not have a clue about how perfect that timing was. Which of course was a great thing and just like Christine stated in her review what actually opened up the Japanese artisan market to the west… Imagine that to be accomplished by a tiny little Youtuber… It’s pretty much unheard of!

But, had the timing not been that perfect, his brushes would probably not have become as mainstream Or perhaps even as loved as they are now and that would have also perhaps levelled the expectations to a bit more normal levels for his makeup line… ? I mean none of his products, brushes or other are geared towards the collectors and hoarders. They are made to be what he likes to use and what he thinks is helpful for the not so very savvy but willing to learn some tricks of the trade from the MUA world for dummies. That his brushes suits also the hoarders and the collectors and one or two MUA’s is probably more of a fluke. And perhaps we need to see also his palette from this perspective. I mean the brushes were in a sense easier to make excellent right off the bat since he used the most skilled brush making people in the world to make them. All other brush makers pale in comparison to the Japanese artisans… There is no such crowd or nation known for their excellence in eyeshadow or lipstick making… So making eyeshadow palettes unless you are going to start mixing your pigments yourself experimentally will mean you will have to find a factory that makes stuff that seems in line with what you are looking for. But that is more a matter of finding the needle in the haystack probably… ? And still he has been able to make an eye shadow palette that Temptalia finds reason to review and that earns even as high a score as a B… that is actually pretty good! Had it received a D it would have been bad. But B’s have even Natasha Denona who actually makes her own eyeshadows earned on occasion.

I am sure that if Wayne Goss continues to make eyeshadow palettes he will probably change his formulas several times over the years just like most brand owners do, (looking at you Natasha Denona., who also by the way like to make big eye shadow pans, almost exactly as big as WG btw…) But that remains to be seen.
Since Wayne Goss seems to be quite a sensitive soul, all this anger and resentment and even hate that can be seen surrounding this launch of his little eyeshadow palette could even make him choose not to make anything more – which would be quite sad in my opinion, since I think this industry needs more of the small fish with a big heart like Wayne Goss rather than the ones who only try to please the hunger of the market all the time to keep the obsessive consumerism going…

And just as You Amanda here stated that you think these eyeshadows are beautiful and work well for you, so will a lot of other people think if they dare to try it now after all this bashing.

Finally on the heated topic of the inclusion or not of a black eyeshadow – how could that even become such a black and white, (pun intended) anger filled discussion??
For people who know what Wayne has preached for the last ten years or so – it would have been highly weird if he had not included a black eye shadow in his palette. Nor that he at this stage, (My guess is however he will not dare to follow through on it for fear of his life), would have the intention of putting one in every palette. Why? Because he has preached the importance or learning how to become friends with black eye shadow over and over again. And his main point is to use it to deepen other shades, which he has showed his technique for over and over again on his channel. That is to me as staple to him as his brush number 02 ever will be…;) It would have been totally out of character for him and even a complete sell out in my opinion had he not dared to do just that! And that is regardless of whether or not that is something you want in a palette or not. If you want a Wayne Goss palette – that is what you will get… If you do not want that – there are millions of palettes out there who does not have a black eyeshadow to choose from. Get one of them then… It does not make his eyeshadow either better or worse, the black eyeshadow makes this palette a Wayne Goss palette. – as it should.

To me, it is important to hold all brands to the same standard; giving this brand or any brand that is self-funded (of which there are many) to a lower standard or to somehow expect me–or anyone else–to insulate them from criticism, discussion, or anything not excitement and praise completely does a disservice to the entire community, but especially consumers. This concept that we should be nicer because we “know” the founder is part of the marketing. This mentality is why I’m very hesitant to try newer, indie brands because I can’t trust a lot of the reviews about them as many people fear backlash from owners and smaller brands.

My review wasn’t bashing the product – writing about one’s experience, whether good or bad, shouldn’t be positioned as anger, hate, or bashing because it isn’t praise. This is why I’m not a fan of calling reviews “negative” because it’s just a review – it is a summary of the experience I had with the product. I have written at length about certain launches, especially when they catch the attention of the community. See: Makeup Geek Sparklers, Bad Habit Beauty (first reviews), Anastasia Subcultuure, NARS x Guy Bourdin, Louboutin (initial reviews), Flesh Beauty (a whole write-up), Jaclyn Cosmetics, Lime Crime, Sigma Brushes, etc. (Some of the ones that stand out in my memory!)

This brand is asking you for $55 for an eyeshadow palette, and the customer is absolutely entitled to receive a high-quality product that lives up to their expectations/what they were hoping to get out of it (whatever that may be). There’s no excuse to put out something lackluster because it’s the first release–they can use feedback to improve, but products are developed and tested, then released… not the other way around. Not to mention — that is what the brand has positioned it as: a high-quality product, not a test-run, not a sample, not something still in development.

I adore Wayne Goss and his beauty philosophy. However upon first glance this palette is the bastard child of Way Bandy and Edward Bess. I cannot speak to the quality but these colors are jus too warm and sallow for my porcelain complexion. As temped as I am to buy I’m passing.

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