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The Best & Worst of Too Faced Peaches & Cream Blushes/Bronzers

Too Faced Peaches & Cream Blushes
Too Faced Peaches & Cream Blushes

Too Faced Peaches & Cream Collection launched six new blushes, two bronzers, and a highlighter. The blushes, one bronzer, and highlighter have a cream-to-powder formula, while one bronzer is a traditional powder, though it had quite a bit of overspray, and even after using a paper towel to remove it, it still seemed to have some shimmer.

On the cream-to-powder products, their consistency felt creamy to the touch, but it also felt a little powdery. It had a candy-coated shell initially–very shiny–but after one or two uses, the texture looked more matte and felt a lot drier. It seemed almost as if it was drying out over time, so ultimately, it felt more like a powder going on most of the time. The texture was thinner and while it was no trouble to diffuse the product across the skin, it did not do so that evenly, and I noticed a lot of color that seemed to sit in my pores (like dots of deeper color). The coverage was more buildable when applied with a fingertip, but it was a challenge to get more coverage that was still blended as the color seemed to disappear as I blended it out (even just a little).

The only way I could manage decent application was patting color on the apples of the cheeks with fingertips and lightly pressing to blend, and then going back with a bit of foundation actually blend out the edges. The wear was short end on bare skin at six to seven hours. Over foundation, they were worse, as they lifted liquid foundations a lot, which resulted in uneven coverage and some unevenness in overall texture, too, as the cream-to-powder formula caused clumping with my liquid foundations (I tried three different ones with this blush formula).

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The Best & Worst of Make Up For Ever Artist Face Colors

Make Up For Ever Artist Face Colors - Blushes
Make Up For Ever Artist Face Colors – Blushes

Make Up For Ever Artist Face Color ($23.00 for 0.17 oz.) is available in three types–Highlighter, Sculpting, and Blush–with a total of 34 shades available. The formula is supposed to have “intense color payoff” with a “long-lasting finish.” The range is split into three types–Highlighters, Sculpting Powders, and Blushes–that is easy to determine by the first letter of the shade name (H for Highlighter, S for Sculpting, and B for Blush). There are three finishes–matte, shimmer, and pearl but was less obvious. In fact, the majority of the “matte” shades were more like semi-matte or natural matte where there were no distinctive shimmer particles but they seemed to take on the natural finish of the skin, which gave the “mattes” a particularly seamless finish on the skin but might be dewier on oilier skin types than desired. None of the 34 shades available were frosted or metallic except three of the highlighters (H100, H106, H312).

The pigmentation ranged from medium to opaque, depending largely on the shade, though they were always buildable if they were not opaque in a single layer. Some of the deeper, more matte shades were less forgiving and took more effort to diffuse and blend, even when I used a lighter hand or a more feathery brush. The texture was smooth, velvety, and moderately dense without any powderiness or dustiness in the pan. The formula has lasted between eight and ten hours on me.

The Best & Worst of Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinsticks

01/04

Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick  

Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick  

Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick  

Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick  

Fenty Beauty Match Stix Shimmer Skinstick ($25.00 for 0.25 oz.) is a cream formula that can be used as a highlight or blush and is available in 10 shades. The formula is supposed to be long-wearing with a “light-as-air,” “blendable” texture that “lives to be layered” and has “buildable, creaseproof” coverage. They twist-up and are medium-sized with a domed edge. I found that applying to my fingertips worked better than direct application, as it enabled me greater control over coverage level as well as placement, and if you tend to apply over foundation, then this will help keep the Match Stix cleaner, too.

The texture was thin, and it did seem to go from a “cream” in the tube to a more powder-like product once on the skin. They were fairly blendable with a few being more sparkly with less visible base color, which may not be for everyone, and others had a more pearl-like sheen that didn’t emphasize my skin’s natural texture. Most shades applied and blended out without lifting up foundation or pulling into pores (over bare skin), but the ones that did tended to have larger particles in them. They lasted between six and eight hours on me.

A problem I had throughout just swatching each shade on my cheeks for photos was that whatever was exposed was a bit dry, more powdery to the touch, and I felt like I had to really warm the product up and/or swipe it back and forth on the back of my hand to refresh the texture. This is not uncommon with drier, cream-based formulas, but it’s still a downside and an area that could be improved upon. Some shades were very pigmented, others were medium and buildable, and a couple were sheerer.

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The Best & Worst of Urban Decay Fall 2017 Vice Lipsticks

Urban Decay Vice Lipsticks
Urban Decay Vice Lipsticks

Here’s a look at how well the newest additions to the Urban Decay Vice Lipstick ($17.00 for 0.11 oz.) lineup did! In terms of where one can find them, five are exclusive to the brand’s website (Caliente, Control, Hawkeye, Plague, Heartache), while ten are available at other retailers. Also: a few of the shades were previously released as limited edition shades.

The Best & Worst of Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighters

01/04

Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter  

Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter  

Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter  

Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter  

Fenty Beauty Killawatt Freestyle Highlighter ($34.00 for 0.24 oz./0.28 oz.) is available in two individual shades along with four duos. The formula is described ranging from “subtle dayglow to insanely supercharged” with a “cream-powder hybrid” formula that feels “weightless” and is long-wearing. They can also be used on the eyes, body, lips, and so forth, per the brand. They feel like a traditional powder, but they have a smooth, moderately dense texture that doesn’t kick up a lot of excess product in the pan but also does not feel stiff or difficult to pickup with the brush. The finishes varied from shade to shade; where Metal Moon was the most subtle and had a satin-to-pearl finish, Trophy Wife was the most over-the-top with chunky, obvious glitter and less base color compared to the other shades.

The duos featured a light-to-moderate highlighter on the left and then a more sparkly, metallic highlighter on the right with the exception of Ginger Binge/Moscow Mule, where the left shade (Ginger Binge) was more intense (possibly owing to the richer color and payoff). In general, I found the left, more subtle side of each duo to be sheer to semi-sheer, somewhat buildable, whereas the right, more metallic side was substantially more pigmented. All of the more intense highlighters (Trophy Wife and the right side of the duos) did accentuate the look of my skin’s natural texture to some degree.

For use on the eye, they worked better with a slightly dampened brush, as it gave the powder a bit more binding powder for better adherence to the lid, but the ones I tried on the lid were blendable and easy to apply with no real concerns from the application itself other than the potential for fallout over time.

The Best & Worst of Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Liquid Lipsticks

01/03

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Liquid Lipstick  

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Liquid Lipstick  

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Liquid Lipstick  

Charlotte Tilbury Hollywood Lips Matte Liquid Lipstick ($34.00 for 0.24 oz.) is described as having the glide “like a gloss” with a “soft-focus matte” finish that will “nurture your lips like a cream” while having “full coverage.” The texture of the formula was mousse-like without a lot of slip or wetness; it definitely felt more velvety and smooth with an airy quality to its “thickness.” The color spread comfortably across the lips and typically yielded semi-opaque to opaque coverage that went on evenly but sometimes settled into my lip lines.

I did not find them to be particularly long-wearing–more like a standard bullet lipstick than a more traditional liquid lipstick, which was likely due to the fact that these never fully set or dried down on me. They had a semi-matte to satin finish that wore down to a matte finish (after two to three hours). The wear ranged from three to five hours on me and was fairly comfortable, though I would not describe the formula as hydrating.

The applicator is supposed to be like a stiletto heel, and it had a very steep angle that I did not find hugged my lips as well as the brand seemed to design it to–there are a lot of other doe-foot-like applicators that are more curved now to hug the lips that have been easier to use. The steepness of Charlotte Tilbury’s applicator is what made it harder to apply for me, and I ended up using the other side for a lot of my upper lip. The formula had a sweet, vanilla scent that was slightly noticeable on the lips but no discernible taste.