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Charlotte Tilbury x Norman Parkinson On Call Makeup Bag Photos & First Impressions

Charlotte Tilbury x Norman Parkinson On Call Makeup Bag
Charlotte Tilbury x Norman Parkinson On Call Makeup Bag

Charlotte Tilbury x Norman Parkinson On Call Makeup Bag ($45.00) is a “vinyl makeup bag” that features an image of Jerry Hall, which was shot by Norman Parkinson for British Vogue, on Montego Bay, Jamaica in 1975. The interior features two side pockets, which you don’t see too often in makeup bags (especially small-to-medium-sized ones). The bag wrinkles really easily, so you may want to store it stuffed (maybe a scarf) when it is not in use. It stained really easily, as I just had it on my photography table (which always has bits and bobs of makeup after I shoot a bunch of products) and all of the powdery bits that got on it don’t seem to come off. The makeup bag is 7″ in length, 5″ in height, and 1.5″ in width.

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Ted Baker Midnight Bloom Cosmetic Cases Overview & Photos

Ted Baker Midnight Bloom Cosmetic Cases
Ted Baker Midnight Bloom Cosmetic Cases

Ted Baker Midnight Bloom Cosmetic Cases ($49.00 regularly, $31.90 through August 2nd) are available in fuchsia pink and glossy black. They’re part of Nordstrom’s Anniversary sale, and I couldn’t resist. Both bags are exactly the same in size and shape: eight inches in width, six inches in height, and three and a half inches at its widest point.

I really like them, as they hold their shape so they stand up well for when you can’t lay out all of your things (but the downside is they’re not as easily squished into tight spaces if you’re low on room in a suitcase or bag), and the wider bottom makes it really easy to get quads, blushes, and the like stacked on the bottom. It’s just the right length to hold one of my longer brushes (Make Up For Ever #128). I filled it with thirty some-odd brushes, half a dozen eyeliners, and then bits and bobs like an eyelash curler, cream eyeshadows, and a pencil sharpener for the more narrowed area towards the zipper closure. The exterior will be easy to wipe down, though the interior doesn’t seem the most practical for makeup (seems satiny to me).

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Hakuhodo x Sephora PRO Brush Collection Photos & First Impressions

Hakuhodo x Sephora PRO Brush Collection
Hakuhodo x Sephora PRO Brush Collection

Hakuhodo x Sephora PRO Brush Collection consists of five face brushes that are made out of synthetic fibers. All five are on the larger side and dense with a lot of spring/give (particularly the Large Teardrop brush, which seems almost floppy as the brush tapers). The edges of all five brushes was very even, and I didn’t have any issues with scratchiness or feeling an odd bristle while trying the brushes in multiple directions. The fibers don’t seem as fine as they could be–IT’s Velvet Luxe line is softer and smoother in feel against the skin. I’m uncertain about some of the shapes and how versatile/useful they will be, but that is a personal call based on my own preferences, but you may want to see them in-store if you can.

It was apt that all but one brush was specifically named as a “Powder Brush,” because these seemed to be best with powders. Their density, though, made then prone to picking up and applying quite a bit of product, so you’ll want to use a light hand or use this with your sheerer to medium coverage products. I do not recommend using this with a bright candy apple red blush, for example, which is my personal test for seeing how much powder is deposited in a pick-up as well as how well the brush blends the color out (red blush is unforgiving, it gets splotchy quite easily without good application). As a side note, all of that intense red blusher washed right off with no staining (which is as expected).

Despite being a synthetic material, which often lends itself to liquid application, the Kusabi (Wedge Sloping Powder Brush) worked poorly with liquid/cream foundation as is very streaky, while the Kusuriyubi (Angled Concealer Brush) must be used to pat concealer into place rather than any sweeping or blending motions as it will leave slight lines. I think the Kusuriyubi is rather large, so it only worked okay underneath the eye (larger area), but it doesn’t fit as well into the grooves of the nose, around the mouth, under the brow, or for concealing acne or spots.

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Chikuhodo x Beautylish Sakura Brush Set Photos & Comparisons (Plus, First Impressions)

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Sakura Brush Set
Chikuhodo x Beautylish Sakura Brush Set

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Sakura Brush Set ($215.00) is a five-piece brush set created as a collaboration between retailer Beautylish and Japanese brush maker Chikuhodo (see reviews here). I haven’t had much time to use the brush set, so these are first impressions (and may be the only “review” I’ll write-up, as these are almost sold out). All five brushes appeared very even across the edges upon arrival, and the brushes are incredibly soft, with the exception of the Detail brush, which isn’t scratchy but comes to such a fine point that it is a firmer brush so you’ll want to use light pressure when working with it. The price point is higher than your average brush set but seems in line with the pricing of most handmade, Japanese brushes, if not a little cheaper. The handles have cherry blossoms cascading vertically, and I tried scratching at them with my nails, and none of the sheen or color flaked off. Three of the brushes (Powder, Crease, Detail) are shapes that I don’t find my collection, so that was a nice touch. I’m not sure about the usefulness of the crease brush, but I’m certainly game to give it a try. I think the best brush in the collection is the Cheek brush, with the Powder and Shade brushes right behind it.

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Powder Brush is a large powder brush with a very rounded, angled edge that is flatter than your typical, round powder brush. The angle almost made me think it wasn’t cut right, but the angle is deliberate (described as “allows you to emphasize your most flattering features”). The angled edge is new to me, but it fits well when you brush across the cheek bones, going from the nose to the outer edge of the cheeks. It is incredibly soft and airy, and you don’t feel any of the individual bristles when using it. It is made out of a mix of grey squirrel and goat hair. The brush head is 54mm in length, 42mm in width, and 23mm in thickness. It had a total length of 6.5 inches / 17 centimeters with a lightly pinched ferrule. I compared it to Chikuhodo’s GSN-03 Cheek Brush ($127), which is made out of the same type of hairs, but the Sakura Powder brush is noticeably softer with finer bristles; they are similar in general size and shape, except the Sakura Powder brush has the angled edge and is flatter overall.

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Cheek Brushis a small-to-medium-sized cheek brush with a rounded dome shape that is flatter than some blush brushes (it isn’t rounded as a whole). The shape is perfect for patting on blush and then sweeping to blend and diffuse the edges. It will pick-up less powder than a goat-haired brush will, so the effect is subtler from the get-go and often makes applying blush more foolproof. It is very soft and smooth, and no matter the direction, it never irritates the skin. It is made out of grey squirrel hair. The brush head is 37mm in length, 28mm in width, and 16mm in thickness. It had a total length of 6 inches / 15 centimeters. I compared it to Chikuhodo’s Z-4 Cheek/Highlight Brush ($73), which is wider and fluffier; and SUQQU Cheek (£80.00), which is smaller, flares from the base more, and is more rounded with an airier feel overall, while the softness of the Sakura Cheek is very comparable to both.

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Crease Brush is a very long, tapered, and pointed crease brush that has hairs that start short on the exterior and get longer and longer as they taper. While it comes to a more distinct point, it doesn’t feel sharp (likely because the bristles taper, so there are only a few that reach the very tip) and is feathery (not very dense). This one is going to take some practice to work with, and it has such a light touch that it sometimes tickles to use (for me). It is made out of grey squirrel hair. The brush head is 20mm in length, 6mm in width and thickness (at its widest). It had a total length of 5.25 inches / 13.5 centimeters. I compared to Wayne Goss #04 Crease Brush ($28), mostly for size, as the way they’re designed is quite different.

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Shader Brush is a medium-sized, flat dome-shaped eye brush. This type of brush is similar to more well-known brushes like MAC’s 239, and it is good for depositing powder product on the eyelid. The flatter shape makes it ideal for patting and packing on eyeshadow, but the domed edge and ultra-soft bristles allow maneuverability along the lid as well as into the crease and for light blending. It is made out of grey squirrel hair. The brush head was 12mm in length, 11mm in width, and 5.4mm in thickness. It had a total length of 5 inches / 12.5 centimeters. The brush is wider and flatter compared to Chikuhodo’s GSN-09 ($25), which is also made out of grey squirrel (and one of my favorite brushes).

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Detail Brush is a very tiny brush that is flat and tapers to a rounded tip–it looks almost like a triangle. It is made out of fitch and horse hairs. The brush head is 7mm in length, 4.3mm in width, and 2.2mm in thickness. It had a total length of 4.75 inches / 12 centimeters. It is a very small brush and best used with light pressure, as it is rather pointed, and so it will feel almost sharp if you use too much pressure. I could see it being useful for applying eyeshadow on the lower lash line, inner corner, pin point concealing, or concealing underneath the brow bone or along the lips.  More for reference, I showed it next to Chikuhodo’s Z-10 ($45), which is a more pointed crease brush, but it is quite a bit larger.

MAC 137, 221, 267 Brushes Reviews & Photos

MAC 137 Long Blending Brush
MAC 137 Long Blending Brush

MAC 137 Long Blending Brush ($42.00) is a long, tapered cheek/face brush made out of natural fibers. It’s supposed to be used for a “light dusting of any powder.” The brush head is 22mm in width, 22mm in thickness, and 49mm in length. It had a total length of 7.4 inches / 18.7 centimeters and an open, metal ferrule. This brush was manufactured in Japan. The brush has a really light, feathery feel and is perfect for dusting highlighters onto cheek bones, down the bridge of the nose, or applying a finishing powder all over with more control than a fan brush would give you. What I was most surprised by was how soft the brush is, because a lot of MAC’s recent brushes have been rougher in feel, and many of their cheek and face brushes (even from before) aren’t that soft, but this is one of the softest MAC brushes I’ve come across that has natural fibers. This is very comparable to Wayne Goss Brush 14 ($33) as far as length and purpose go, though MAC’s is significantly more tapered, longer by 8mm, a little less soft, and a bit denser (though not a dense brush by any means).

MAC 221 Mini Tapered Blending Brush ($24.00) is a small, lightly tapered crease brush made out of natural fibers. The brush head is 6.5mm in width, 6.5mm in thickness, and 16.5mm in length. It had a total length of 6.5 inches / 16.6 centimeters with an open, metal ferrule. It is also made in Japan. There’s a slight taper that comes to a rounded point, so it doesn’t create too harsh of placement into the crease, but it does give you precise placement. I liked it best for initially placing richer color into the deep crease and then using a fluffier brush to blend it out. It’s soft and never felt scratchy or poky no matter the direction or pressure I used. It is similar to Hakuhodo J5529 ($16) and Wayne Goss Brush 05 ($25).

MAC 267 Curved Angle Brush ($24.00) is a synthetic brush designed to be used with your eyeliner (like gels and creams, though MAC also suggests powder) with a curved edge that is supposed to fit the natural curve of the eye. The brush head is 11.5mm in width, 2.5mm in thickness, and 11.5mm in length. It had a total length of 6.25 inches / 15.9 centimeters with a pinched, metal ferrule. It was made in China. I found this brush to be scratchy and rough against the skin, which made it painful to drag across to apply gel eyeliner on the skin. It somewhat fits the curve of the eye, but I think it is going to depend on the size of your eye and how curved your lid/area is, as it seemed oversized for my eye shape/size. I don’t recall having a brush quite like this, so it seems to be more unique.

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Wayne Goss #02, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 Face Brushes Review & Photos

Wayne Goss Brushes
Wayne Goss Brushes — 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

There are nine Wayne Goss Brushes designed for the face. It’s a good, solid range for cheek and face options, with shapes that should work for many. The most interesting brush that I tried was the #14, while the brushes I used and liked the most would be the #02, #11, and #15. I also liked #12 a lot, but I have two very similar brushes that I favor a wee bit more, so I don’t tend to reach for it on my own. The brushes feel lighter-weight than some higher-end brushes, but they don’t feel poorly balanced with what weight is there. Japanese-style natural brushes have been noticeably better to significantly better in quality over most mainstream mid- to high-end brands (think Bobbi Brown, Chanel, MAC, NARS, etc.).

Wayne Goss Brush 02 ($35.00) is a small, tapered brush that starts off narrow at the base, flares upwards to about two-thirds and then tapers towards the tip to a rounded point. The brush is incredibly soft, moderately dense, with just enough flex and give for blending and maneuvering around the cheek bones, bridge of the nose, across the forehead, or underneath the eyes. It’s small enough to work on a variety of face shapes and sizes, but it’s not so small that it feels inefficient. The brush head is 33mm in length, 19mm in width, and 19mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.6 inches / 17 centimeters. MAC 165 ($34, discontinued) is more rounded but similar in shape and purpose. Hakuhodo J5521 ($38) is similar as well, but it is also rounder overall with less of a noticeable tapering along the edges.

Wayne Goss Brush 10 ($53.00) is a large, stippling brush with a wide, flat edge with a mix of synthetic and goat hairs. It’s designed to work with liquid and cream foundations, which it does a nice job of, but I have found that more rounded brushes tend to provide the most streak-free finish relative to stippling brushes. These days, I like stippling brushes of this size for powder products (bronzer, blush, finishing powders in particular), as well as for diffusing and blending out the overall look (similar to the function of a buffer brush, but this will move base products less, as it has an airier feel against the skin). It is extremely soft and feels feathery against the skin, despite being a fairly dense brush, except for the last fourth of the brush, where it has more spring and feels less dense. The brush head is 40mm in length, 31mm in width, and 35mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.5 inches / 16.75 centimeters. This brush is comparable to MAC 187 ($42), which is slightly less dense and narrower with less fluffy flaring.

Wayne Goss Brush 11 ($48.00) is a medium-sized cheek brush with moderate density, a rounded, domed shape. It is fairly soft, though noticeably less-soft compared to some of my other blush brushes (of which I have some very high-end options to choose from), but it’s with this brush that I noticed a lesser softness, whereas the majority of the ranges in the line haven’t been as distinguishable. I really like this brush for most blushes, except really pigmented ones, and it is a good option for that firmer pressed blush, as the larger surface and density seem to help it lift more product off the pan’s surface than a more feathery brush. It lays down color and blends it out nicely. The brush head is 37mm in length, 33mm in width, and 22mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.75 inches / 17.25 centimeters. It’s like a much improved version of MAC 129 ($35), which has a good shape for an all-purpose blush brush, but it is one of the scratchiest MAC brushes made.

Wayne Goss Brush 12 ($53.00) is a medium-sized, dense blush brush with a wider, rounded edge with a gentle flaring outwards. It’s soft, silky, and smooth against the skin and has never felt irritating while I’ve used it. This brush is convenient for powder cheek and face products from blush to bronzer, especially for someone who wants medium to full coverage out of their cheek color. This shape is very useful for blending out harder-to-blend powder products along the edges as the flatter edge makes shorter work of it. The brush head is 32mm in length, 41mm in width, and 24mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.5 inches / 16.75 centimeters. This brush is similar to Hakuhodo J5543 ($60), which I find is a smidgen denser and tends to retain its shape without fluffing up as much. Tom Ford Cheek (06) ($78) is very, very similar to the J5543, as they share the same shape, though the Tom Ford is slightly denser, while it fluffs up on the edges more similarly to Brush 12. Both of these are ever-so-slightly smoother against the skin.

Wayne Goss Brush 13 ($53.00) is a small-medium, round brush with a domed edge. In some ways, it’s like a small, buffing brush attached to a long handle. The shape works well with cream and liquid foundations, powder and liquid/cream blushes, as well as powder and liquid/cream highlighters. It can even be used to contour, depending on the style of contour you’re after (it’s large enough that it won’t give you ultra-precision, but the density gives you a lot of control in the initial lay down). It’s moderately soft; soft enough that it is likely to be a decent upgrade for most, but it is less soft than the best synthetics and higher-end natural fiber hairs. The brush head is 31mm in length, 25mm in width, and 25mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.5 inches / 16.75 centimeters. It is very similar in style to MAC 109 ($35), which is denser and less soft. Hakuhodo 210 ($36), which is less smooth/soft (there is a J-series version for $44 that is likely to be softer), but shares the same size and shape. Chikuhodo GSN-04 ($64) is a little longer but is fairly similar.

Wayne Goss Brush 14 ($33.00) is a medium-sized brush that starts off narrow at the base and significantly flares upwards to a rounded, dome edge with low-to-medium density and a very feathery, airy quality to the composition of the bristles. If you like to dust and gently sweep your cheek products on, you’ll probably enjoy this brush, as you’ll never have to worry about being heavy-handed again with this one. I liked it best for applying highlighters and very pigmented blushes, as it yields a very diffused, sheer to semi-sheer coverage level (which can always be built up, of course). It works well for contouring, too, if, like me, you like a more diffused, subtle contour and tend to use a fan brush to achieve that result, but this can do that job as-is (I’d just prefer a denser version personally). It is fairly soft and is comfortable to use on the skin. The brush head is 41mm in length, 22mm in width, and 22mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.5 inches / 16.75 centimeters. I don’t have a brush that’s similar in shape, but the SUQQU Cheek has a similar airy, feathery quality to how it feels during application (but this is much, much softer and smoother) — for those looking to mimic the effect of SUQQU without the bank-breaking price tag, this is well worth a try.

Wayne Goss Brush 15 ($25.00) is a medium-sized fan brush. It is the least soft face brush that I tried from the range, though certainly not genuinely scratchy or rough. I regularly reach for fan brushes like this one, as it isn’t too big or too soft, dense enough to deposit color on the skin but not so dense that it leaves harsh lines. It has flex and give, feels lightly feathery during application and diffuses edges easily. I use this type of brush for contouring, highlighting, and with heavily pigmented blushes. It’s also a good option for a more shimmery finishing or setting powder that you want to dust all-over without over-applying the product. The brush head is 38mm in length, 60mm in width, and 15mm in thickness. It has a total length of 6.6 inches / 17 centimeters. It similar in shape and size to MAC 184 ($24), which is a duo-fiber brush, so the composition of bristles is quite different. Sephora Pro Fan Brush (#65) ($27) is 10mm wider, which makes it less precise. Hakuhodo J4004 ($26) is very similar in shape and size.

There is also one face brush (that I don’t have): #01 (angled, smaller foundation), which would be most likely be used with cream and liquid products (primarily foundation).

Brush 02
Brush 02
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