Wayne Goss The Artist Brush Review & Photos

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Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  
Wayne Goss The Artist Brush  

The Artist Brush

Wayne Goss The Artist Brush ($150.00) is a limited edition face brush with an extra-long, wooden handle. The brush head is made out of a mix of gray squirrel and Sokoho goat hair, and the handle is listed as being made out of hand-carved, hard maple wood. The brush is supposed to apply a “soft halo of seamless color.” The brush head was 55mm in length, 33mm in width and depth at its widest point. It is long and comes to a tapered, rounded point. The brush had a total length of 9.85 inches / 25.00 centimeters.

The brush had moderate softness, is full and dense but not quite as dense as a buffer or kabuki brush. I was surprised that it did not feel softer or smoother against the skin. The brush head itself is on the longer side, so there was a little more floppiness at the base than I expected. I used it with loose and pressed powder, bronzer, blush, and highlighter, and I think the results for colored products was the best. It is a brush that seemed to pick up products just fine, but what it laid down was softer coverage, even when I used a more pigmented product. The only way I found it usable was sweeping forward and backward in one fluid motion, but it did not work well for swirling, light buffing, or quick back-and-forth motions. It seemed to bend unnaturally and did not splay well for much else.

As it just debuted (but is limited edition), I haven’t had it for long enough to know how it would hold up over time. There was nothing about the brush that suggested low quality, and my other Wayne Goss brushes have held up beautifully over time. The brush head seemed well-constructed with an even edge, no stray bristles, and no shedding. I haven’t noticed any dye bleeding from washing yet either.

I think that this is ideal for someone who enjoys the overall look and appearance of the brush or prefers an incredibly long handle that is still lightweight. For the price point, there are a lot of other face brushes I’d opt for first, whether from a softness standpoint or to get a more versatile shape.

The Artist Brush

PPermanent. $150.00.
B+
B+
13
Product
12
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
88%
Total
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About Reviewer
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Reviewer

Christine Mielke is the editor-in-chief and has been reviewing products for over 14 years.

She has normal-to-dry skin with occasional dryness on cheeks and nose. She has a light plus skintone with subtle, warmer yellow undertones (view her foundation matches here).

Learn more about her review process here.

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55 Comments

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That’s beautiful, and definitely a collector’s brush! I love how Wayne uses this teardrop style tapered shape in a lot of his brushes. I love that style of brush for applying powder so it’s great to see more like it on the market. Sadly this is too expensive, and I agree with you that if I were to be paying $150USD, I’d rather buy a SUQQU (or two).

It’s a beautiful brush, but it’s not for me! I like shorter handled brushes for one, and I do not have the funds to drop $150+shipping+exchange rate on one brush!

Thank you for the review christine!!

OMG CHRISTINE, when I saw the B+ rating, I was SHOOK. But really, you didn’t tell me anything I hadn’t already guessed at. As someone who truly admires Japanese brushes, this release missed the mark for me and left me confused. I still can’t figure out why Wayne decided to pair Grey Squirrel and Sokoho Goat of all things; especially at this price point, I was expecting either full grey/blue squirrel, or at the very least a Saikoho/Grey mix. What’s more is that prior to releasing this, he re-released his Air-Brush, which was such an astounding value and quality. This timing of releases sets the stage for prospective buyers to think to themselves, “This brush is not worth $150 when Wayne is releasing amazing quality brushes for a price point like $35” and unfortunately this reasoning is bolstered by his use of materials, which, again, truly perplexes me. I have a lot of respect for Wayne as a makeup artist and entrepreneur, but this brush felt like a waste of materials to me. At least it has a pretty handle!

I expected it to be a little softer, even though it was mixed with Sokoho!

I can’t recall, and I tried to google an answer, what type of goat hair Hakuhodo uses in their B series (blue squirrel/goat), but I like those a lot more for a mixed, more durable set of bristles.

OMG I know EXACTLY which ones you’re talking about. I just bought the G511 from the new collection. It’s blue squirrel and saikoho goat, both undyed. So SO soft!!!!

There’s no way I can justify getting that one, like, ever. (Even though it’s $31 cheaper than the Artist brush, at only $119!) I got this year’s Beautylish X Chikuhodo Sakura set, as well as the Violet Noel set from Chikuhodo. Between these two sets and my Hakuhodo B002, I think I’m set on powder brushes! However, if I’m ever like, ROLLING around in money someday, I would buy that full set!

I could possibly see a brush like this coming in handy for people like me who tend to be a tad heavy handed with makeup application sometimes, but it still does sound like quite a bit of work to use. At this price point, that might be too much finessing required.

I too have been happy with my Wayne Goss brushes. I like Chikuhodo and Hakudodo better I will say, but WG is close enough for me to have no regrets in my purchases. This new brush is lovely and will remain admired from afar.

My friend Yukari got back from Japan just yesterday with my new Chikuhodo brushes! I think these are the last of the brushes I need in my collection. If it’s not out of line, I’ll report on the list I have in the Friday haul post and report on what I think.

I know the Japanese brushes are pricey, but if I would have known how good they really are, in the long run I would have spent far, far less money overall.

For $150, this brush better have 10 uses, but sounds like its usefulness is pretty limited. And since I’m petite, my arms are shorter than normal, not a fan of extra long handles. It’s definitely a statement piece and interesting to look at, but for $ 150 I think I’m better off buying multiple brushes that can be used in different ways

I have longer arms and bigger hands (or at least, I think so, lol), but it wasn’t particularly natural to use or hold, I’d say.

One would really expect much better, nicer quality at such an elevated price level. Not a fan of such a long handle, either. As I am quite nearsighted and need to get reasonably close to my makeup mirror to see what I’m doing, that handle would drive me up a wall!

I adore Wayne Goss and love his youtube channel. He is a gifted makeup artist and a charming, cheeky man. But, really – $150 for a makeup brush that isn’t even really meant for use every day (as was reported earlier by someone here) and is more of a “display piece”, I gather? Sorry but to me, a makeup brush is nothing more than a tool (and to tell the truth, we do have some lovely old wooden handled tools on the wall in our family room but they belonged to hubby’s husband and I think were old (i.e. used/second hand, as they used to say or “vintage” as they say now) even when he got them. But I don’t buy makeup brushes to use as display piece. I’d rather put the $150 toward a piece of real art or sculpture. It is beautiful and I say “Congrats” to Wayne but, not for me this beautiful but pricey brush.

It sounds like part of the intent behind it was to create a collector’s item, which is most certainly is, though I wish it was still more functional. I do not adhere to it, but in general squirrel hair brushes are only supposed to be washed once in a great while (I wash mine like the rest, and I’m OK with the potential of replacing them after 5, 10, or 15 years of use – whatever that might be!), so I’m guessing that might be why that was said – a few readers said that Wayne Goss said the opposite via Instagram (that it could be used regularly).

I think the ‘not to be used on a daily basis’ was a misunderstanding by Beautylish that Wayne responded to quickly on Instagram. But, it revealed the lack of marketing/support materials that generated confusion overall about what this brush does, how to use, why a long handle, how to clean, etc. That video is coming, but a bit late. Will decide to keep or not once I see that video and see more reviews.

It’s absolutely beautiful and I’m sure it’s very nice but I would be hitting it all the time on the mirror. I’m getting older and keep leaning in to my lighted mag mirror to see better. Lol

Thus review confirmed everything I was thinking about this brush. I would rather spend $150 on more of the salt and pepper Hakuhodo brushes. Plus they sound like lhey are a much better blend of goat and squirrel than this WG brush.

The new squirrel/goat blend brushes that Hakuhodo did (with the undyed goat) are incredible – and I like that the addition of goat makes them a little more practical/durable compared to just squirrel hair.

I look at this and think this one is primarily about packaging – so either the length is a real boon (most Japanese brushes seem to have shorter handles than most U.S. brands) or the actual design of the handle is aesthetically pleasing – and obviously you don’t mind the price!

I guess I’m the oddity here. I prefer long handled brushes. I have a couple from years ago when Laura Mercier and Bobbi Brown included them in their lines. I think long handled brushes create a much nicer finish.

I think they have their place – it is a preference more than anything, IMO! If you have a very light hand already, a shorter brush may be better, but if you are very heavy handed, holding it further away (on the handle, e.g. more length) can give a less intense finish – but it depends on your preferences, needs, products you use, etc.

You might like Louise Young or UD’s brushes – they are longer than average to me!

This was such an easy pass for me I don’t like the handle at all and I would not spend 1/2 that for this brush. It doesn’t interest me at all. There are sooo many brushes out there now and still my faves are Shuuemura eye brushes which I own two of each and I love Suqqu and some Mac eye brushes and also hakuhodo, koyudo and others but the only ones I would spend that kind of money on right now is Suqqu. I mostly use Real Techniques. I think a lot of makeup artist that have started making brushes think oh I’ll make it and everyone will just buy it no matter what price tag is on it half the stuff they make I don’t want it if they gave it to me let alone pay for it.

It’s Urban Decay’s Large Powder Brush! Most of the new UD brushes are pretty long!

Louise Young’s brushes are pretty long as well!

Not my cup of tea. I may not use the brushes I buy as often as I should or could, but I am not just going to buy a brush to collect. I am not Sonja with all her beautiful brushes and a glass storage museum. And I think she uses her brushes. I personally find this brush ridiculous. I have bought two of the air brush, one tight liner brush, one tiny crease brush and the lip brush by Goss which I find them to be unique. So it is not like I am not familiar with his brushes. I plainly think this brush is absurd.

The Air Brush is/was so great – the price point was perfect, and the brush itself was lovely. In general, I like a lot of the WG brushes (particularly all the eye ones), but this is a miss. One of the things that I have found to be best about the WG line is that the shapes are generally versatile – that some of the appeal of the range vs. Hakuhodo (which has similar options at similar price points) is that it is a more edited brush range, so each shape and size is curated and isn’t overwhelming like Hakuhodo’s selection.

That was real quick Christine! First things first – It is so great to see the brush in all its glory – inclear light! 😉 What’s with the dark pics on Beautylish??

I was super excited when i heard about he new brush. When Saw the price tag – honestly, i had a sense of loss as well as, of calm. While i felt bad that i just cannot justify buying it. I actually felt good – Money saved!! If it was say a $65-80 – one might still be contemplating – should i or should i not. At $150 – it’s a clear no for me!

Considering the wooden handle and ferrule – i would be paranoid about using it – at all! Coz how will you wash it without getting water into the wooden ferrule? Nope! Not for me!

I’m not sure what the handle was treated with (if anything), but a lot of makeup brush handles are made out of wood, but the ones I compared to have the metal ferrule between the wood and the brush head, so I’m not sure how it’ll play out over time if you wash frequently with this brush compared to others!

I think as long as you aren’t dunking it in water and leaving it soaked, it should hold up okay, but if they coated or treated it with something, that could help.

I LOVE the long length of this brush-it brings out the true artist in me! Absolutely I can lay down and easily work with any product I have using this tapered style brush. But then, I’m not the type to buff my makeup in like I’m putting wax on a car.

If you’re self taught from watching YouTube videos and not a trained MUA then I can see where long handles on brushes are more of a hindrance than help. But I do believe Wayne Goss made an excellent choice in both the brush head composition and length.

I also appreciate the hand carved handle and am willing to pay a premium to the artists who labored to create this beauty.

I’m glad you are enjoying your brush!

I will say that I am not buffing my makeup in “like I’m putting wax on a car” and I don’t think you have to be a makeup artist (or not) to have a valid preference for longer or shorter handles. I’m not even sure why education is coming into play or that somehow being self-taught is somehow a detriment – there are many people in different professions that are self-taught and do great things, just as there are those who go through training or specific education and go on to do great things – and the reverse is true. I think that one can enjoy and like a product without putting down others who may not 🙂

And vice versa. If someone likes the brush, they shouldn’t feel their purchase was a poor one because of the descriptors used in some of the comments. I appreciate that you tend to keep a very neutral tone, Christine.

Yes, ideally, we are free to love/leave whatever product, for whatever reasons, without making the other side feel like they’re wrong! Even with things like a pigmented eyeshadow – not everyone wants that, and that’s just fine!

I do like this shape of brush for contouring and highlighting, but prefer short handles. Long handles don’t let me get close to the mirror, and I’ve never been able to figure out why some people think longer handles give them more control. Love Wayne, but happy that I skipped this brush.

I think the big thing is that any pressure you exert translates less on the skin if you are holding the brush further away!

OK, I guess that makes sense… easy for me to just use gentle pressure, though, at least with a good quality brush. I tend to hold brushes pretty close to the ferrule. All that extra length is just wasted on me.

Thanks for the review, Christine. I’ll be very interested to see Wayne’s belated video that introduces and demos the brush. From what I’ve read, many are pleased with their purchase from an aesthetic standpoint and want to use it regularly. I haven’t read many accounts of using the brush yet though some have washed the brush. I saw Wayne use it very briefly in one video. Have inquired to some about the handle length and the response was it was more comfortable to hold than expected. I’m reserving judgement until I see his video and lay eyes on mine.

Let me know how you like your brush Tracey!

I’ll be curious to see how people find themselves using it most! What are you hoping to use yours for?

Hi Christine, I’m not entirely sure what I hope to use the brush for..It has to be more than blush, though that comes to mind immediately because he mentioned a ‘halo’ effect. Would love a soft bronzer application and maybe soft powder application (one of my Hourglass powders leaves more color in the winter), but am open to use for multiple purposes. I don’t have a clear idea yet until I have the brush. (I’m away on holidays, so won’t see it for a bit.)

I’m not entirely sure what that means to Wayne Goss/Beautylish, but it does deposit a soft amount of color – so to me it was fairly accurate – a more diffused, sheerer layer of color (I think of how a halo has more blurred edges, is a little translucent – does that make sense?).

That makes sense. Thanks for sharing your findings, Christine. Am curious to see what this brush was designed to do, and what this halo effect is, when WG releases his video.

I would love to see WG do an eye brush set (2-3 brushes) as one of his LE releases because if you are like me and have a functional set of brushes plus a few LE releases you are already swimming in face brushes!

This is the main reason I skipped this one in addition to the fact that I found the email from Beautylish (the one where Nils indicated the brush was more of a collectors item) a little worrisome. Although I am somewhat of a brush collector I don’t want to have to worry I’m potentially ruining something $150 (more like $200 given the Canadian dollar.)

I just received mine and I’m in love! I find the brush to be very soft, much softer than his 00 (but that is all goat of course). I so love the shape of the beautifully handcrafted handle and do not find it too long for me to use. I have a fair number of brushes in my collection which I use on rotation, so I don’t intend to use this on a daily basis. It’s indeed a collector’s brush for me!

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