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Definitely value for me. Since all the products I buy are staple items and things I will use up, I always rank by price/oz or more generally price/unit, rather than price alone. It is by no means the most influencing aspect when determining which products to buy, but it’s something I do consider.

Kind of both, actually. If its an excessive amount of product for a big price tag but better value, I’d go for the smaller amount of product because I don’t need too much. However if it’s cheap, good and has a decent amount of product I’ll buy it. I want to try as much as I can so I’d rather spend the extra money on something else.

Price first, then value. If I don’t have $50 right now, I just can’t afford it regardless of the item(s). I rarely spend $50 on one or two items. The other day I spent $65 on a BB cream and lipstick, but that was because I’d been looking for those 2 things for a while, they were by two of my fave brands, and really thought over whether I’d use them. 

I don’t mind spending quite a bit of money on a product that I know is amazing. But I have to be sure about that first. I once bought a skincare product that cost, errr, let’s say five times what I’d normally spend on it, and all it did was give me a nasty rash… :-/ That made me angry.
 
The greatest feeling, ofcourse, is finding a (cheap!) little gem that’s worth so much more than what it costs 🙂 I have a couple of relatively cheap products that are really great.

What does the asker mean by price or value? Do they mean how good a product you get (as in, you’re willing to pay for a fantastic item, even if its expensive), or the quantity of product you get (For example, cost per ounce)? 

[email protected] Cole   Yes I think it  means .. are you going to go with an olay face cream because of the lower price OR would you spend over 60 dollars on one that worked much better..  I agree with the person who basically said, nail polish remover can be 89 cents but foundation.. is worth paying more for.   I will get lower  grade shampoo but higher end conditioner.   I always pay more for my bobbi brown foundation.   It just works for my skin and doesn’t look like make up on my face.  It wakes up my skin, evens it out , looks natural and is worth every penny.  Tho yeah, sometimes when it’s time to re order I get upset lol but I know it’s worth it when people say ,  you have nice skin. 

I wish everthing come in a mini version and cheaper as I can never finish any of them and it is much easier to carry around as well.

Both are equally important for me.  For example, the primer I use is pretty expensive (about twice the price of most other primers) but because it works, I am willing to pay that price – I feel that it does deliver value in spite of the higher price. By the same token, a very inexpensive concealer I purchased a while back (by Maybelline) didn’t cost much but was a complete waste of money because it’s dreadful on me, so no value there even tough it was under 10 bucks.  What I love best, of course, is finding great value at a great price – the Wet n Wild Comfort Zone palette is a great example of that!

For skincare it’s value since I usually finish all the skincare I buy.
 
For makeup it’s definitely the actual price. This is even more true for lipgloss and lipsticks since they have a shorter life span to begin with. Even though powder products last longer, I still don’t see much point in going out of my way to buy huge amounts (like those ultra expensive Tom Ford blushes that give a huge amount of product, if I buy one it will be because I like the color and quality since I’ll never finish it anyway there’s no point in bring up “price per oz.”).
 
Even when I only owned three eyeshadows and used two of them on a regular basis for a year I never hit pan (and these were standard .05 oz pans). So I don’t see the point in getting a huge quantity of eyeshadow or lipgloss that will probably go bad, get lost, or otherwise I’ll have moved on before I even put a dent in it. 

I think that price is most important, but value can justify (or… whatever the opposite of justify is) a price. If something is high quality or high quantity, the price can be higher without me laughing and walking away.

Price, because I never use anything up! Well – not quite true – I just hit pan for the first time on (of course the very expensive) Guerlain Meteorites Compact powder. 
 
But for just about everything else, I would much rather buy a mini – a third the size for half the price would be a GREAT deal for me!

For me it’s more value – if I’m going to use it and love it, I’ll pay the price for it, but I don’t want to spend the money if it’s not something I’m really going to want and use. But sometimes the actual price is more of a blocker, if I’ve had unexpected bills or something.

How about a balance between the two?  I will not pay a big price for something I will get little use of, but neither will I buy something inexpensive because you get a boat load of product.

Both, I suppose. Value’s obviously important, but at an incredibly high price, it’s still not worth it.

Value – if it like it, I’ll buy it and use it up For me this means “collections”, “palettes”, “kits”, “sets” or “holiday gift sets”. I don’t buy much drugstore makeup because for most of the products, I’ve been terribly disappointed buy the quality. Only mascara I repurchase from the drugstore. But for anything else, I usually get sets, palettes, etc. for the items and only buy them in a set. Finally, I don’t buy a set unless I use everything in there – e.g., if there’s even one eyeshadow in a palette that I definitely won’t use, I don’t buy the whole thing. This way I get good quality makeup without overspending.  

It really depends on the product for me. If it’s a holy-grail item, I’ll buy it as long as I can reasonably afford it. If it’s a large amount of product for less, then I’ll probably look twice at why I get so much at that price and do a lot more reading of reviews. I like to see the trade-off of product/dollar, but that usually doesn’t make or break my decision. 

It depends, really. For a holy grail item, something I have good reason to think I’d love and use a lot, or something simple that I need a continuous supply of (like nail polish remover), getting the best value possible makes sense. But for the most part, I’d rather pay less — it takes a long time to use up even small quantities of makeup.

Value definitely matters most to me, especially on a teen student budget. I can’t justify spending say $50 on a MAC brush when I can find one for half the price that works just as well!

Actually both. It depends on the product I decide to purchase. When it’s about perfumes, well I never pay attention to the price I know it will be high. Regarding makeup it really and definitely depends on the brand.

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