Monday, August 5th, 2013

Sugarpill Hellatronic ElektroCute Neon Pigment
Sugarpill ElektroCute Neon Pigments

Sugarpill ElektroCute Neon Pigments ($16.00 for 0.19 oz.) come in an assortment of five bold, bright shades. Overall, these are going to be a product some will absolutely love and others will find frustrating and difficult to use (and ultimately not worth the patience). These are designed to be used with some sort of base or mixing medium and shouldn’t be applied straight to bare skin. Over the past week, I’ve tried a rich assortment of bases and mixing mediums, and I’ll lay out my findings below, but suffice to say, expect a fair amount of fall out, some trial and error, and maybe a test of your patience. On the plus side, when I wore these out, I was stopped by no less than five people asking me what I was wearing (in the space of an hour).

First and foremost, these are not considered eye safe in the U.S. due to neon pigments (as “the FDA has not yet tested/approved the use of neon pigments in the immediate eye area,” per Sugarpill’s website), but they are considered eye safe in Europe and Canada. I’ve used them on lips and on eyes, but I reiterate that they are not considered eye safe in the U.S. and by using them that way, I am doing so at my own risk (and if you decide to do the same, it is at your own risk). All shades, except Hellatronic, are listed as lip safe.

I had the most luck using NYX’s Jumbo Eye Pencil as a base (the one I used for testing was Electric Blue, and I would have chosen Milk, but I actually don’t have it), as it absorbed and took the color mostly evenly and kept the majority of the sparkles that were pressed on… on for the remainder of the day. I was not able to get nearly as much sparkle to stick to the lid as appears in the jar, though, and the sparkles do not apply evenly and tend to stick randomly. In my test, I applied Sparkage on half of the lid with Hellatronic on the outer half, and all of Sparkage’s sparkles wound up in the center of the lid. Be very careful blending the product and only blend around the edges if applied on the skin. Here are my results with other bases:

  • MAC Mixing Medium: slightly uneven color application, only partial adhesion of sparkles
  • Lit Cosmetics Glitter Base: somewhat even color application but was slightly darkened/patchy in places, better adhesion of sparkles
  • Fyrinnae Pixie Epoxy: good adhesion of sparkles, somewhat even application but very imperative to watch the amount of Pixie Epoxy applied and allow to half-dry before applying (it felt far more finicky to use than when I’ve used it with Fyrinnae’s loose eyeshadows)
  • Regular Eyeshadow Primers: some color applied and fairly evenly, but sparkles go everywhere but the lid (I tried Too Faced Shadow Insurance, NARS Smudge Proof, Urban Decay Original Primer Potion)

These can be applied to the brows by using a mixing medium like Illamasqua’s Sealing Gel or Lit’s Glitter Base and a thin, liner or brow brush. For lips, apply a thin coat of clear gloss and then pat on the pigment across the lips, then blend with fingers, brush, or just press and move your lips together. I like applying a little more gloss after that to get more even color. They can be applied to the body and used to accent body painting. I would recommend a creamy, opaque, slightly tacky base to apply the color on the skin and some of the sparkle, and to intensify the sparkle, use a glitter adhesive and a soft, rounded brush to lightly pat on additional product just where you need it. Small, dome-shaped brushes work the best for me for patting on color precisely and to minimize fall out. I also liked to pat and push my brush against the inside of the lid to keep the product “sticking” to the brush, rather than loosely pressed against it. The opaque base helped the most with yielding even color coverage, as invisible/clear bases seemed to highlight that they don’t always go on perfectly even. I spoke with both xSparkage (Leesha) and Queen of Blending (Lauren), and they both recommend a similar application to maximize color intensity and minimize fall out.

I’m sure some of you are thinking to yourself, “Wow, these sound like a lot of work, why would I bother?” To that, I can easily say that these are the easiest neons I’ve worked with. They are certainly a drastic improvement from MAC’s neon pigments, and these can take dampness better than most matte loose pigments. They’re more pigmented than Sleek’s neon eyeshadows and are slightly easier to blend. Sugarpill’s improved on some of the issues with neon pigments, but there is still plenty of room for improvement (in sparkle dispersion/evenness). Of the shades, Hellatronic was the most interesting and complex, as the base color actually seemed to shift (not just the sparkle), and the sparkle seemed finer and more embedded with the underlying color, whereas the others seemed more like a matte neon pigment with sparkle on top.

I looked across the different types of application (brows, body/skin, lips) to assess a rating, and ultimately, it’s hard to have such a varied application and resulting grade. I suspect most will use these around the eye area as eyeliner, eyeshadow, or brow color, so I did weight how they applied on skin (be it my forearm or somewhere else) slightly more than say lips (which was an area that these were easier to use in). I could not fully contain the fall out (even using adhesive bases designed for glitter). They don’t apply perfectly evenly. They do not want to be blended (together or on their own or with anything else).  When they work, they can look gorgeous and totally traffic-stopping, but to get them there is certainly a journey.

Hellatronic is described as a “fluorescent indigo with red/purple/blue color-shifting super sparkles.” It’s a cool-toned, violet-tinged blue with bluish-violet sparkle. Sephora My Boyfriend’s Jeans is bluer, darker, less sparkly. Sugarpill Velocity is bluer, matte. Urban Decay Chaos is slightly darker, less sparkly. MAC Dynamic Duo 2 #2 is darker, matte. MAC Cobalt is matte. Illamasqua Sadist is bluer, matte. See comparison swatches.

Hi-Viz is described as a “blazing neon yellow with blue/green/gold color-shifting super sparkles.” It’s a brightened, warm-toned yellow with goldish-green sparkle. Fyrinnae Banna Mochi is more frosted, less sparkly. MAC Bright Yellow is more matte. MAC Colour Added is more shimmery, less sparkly. Illamasqua Hype is matte. Inglot #370 is matte. See comparison swatches.

Love Buzz is described as a “brilliant neon hot pink with yellow/orange/red color-shifting super sparkles.” It’s a brightened, neon fuchsia-pink with pinky-red sparkle. Fyrinnae Superstar is more frosted, les ssparkly, lighter. Sugarpill Dollipop is matte, darker. MAC Magenta Madness is similar but has no sparkle. Make Up For Ever #75 is darker, matte. See comparison swatches.

Sparkage is described as “radioactive lime green with blue/green/gold color-shifting super sparkles.” It’s a light-medium, cool-toned green with yellow-ish edges–it looks cool-toned overall, but there’s still a yellowness that comes through. It has green-ish-gold sparkle on top. Sephora Picnic in the Park is darker, less sparkly. Sugarpill Midori is much darker and cooler-toned. Illamasqua Fledgling is slightly darker, matte. See comparison swatches.

Supercharged is described as “flaming neon orange with blue/green/gold color-shifting super sparkles.” It’s a light-medium tangerine orange with golden sparkle. Fyrinnae Pyromantic Erotica is darker, more shimmery, less sparkly. Wet ‘n’ Wild Newport Nights #5 is les ssparkly. Maybelline Fierce & Tangy is darker, brighter, cream product (might work well as a base for this shade). MAC Chessa is less sparkly, more shimmery. Illamasqua Vulgar is a bit darker, matte. See comparison swatches.

The Glossover

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ElektroCute Neon Pigment

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I could not fully contain the fall out (even using adhesive bases designed for glitter). They don't apply perfectly evenly. They do not want to be blended (together or on their own or with anything else). When they work, they can look gorgeous and totally traffic-stopping, but to get them there is certainly a journey.

Product

6/10

Pigmentation

7.5/10

Texture

9/10

Longevity

7/10

Application

2.5/5

Results
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product

Hellatronic

C+

Product

6.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

9.5/10

Longevity

7/10

Application

3/5

Results
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product

Hi-Viz

C-

Product

6/10

Pigmentation

7.5/10

Texture

9/10

Longevity

7/10

Application

2.5/5

Results
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Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

MAC Sheen Supreme Lipglass Tint
MAC Supreme Lipglass Tint

MAC Sheen Supreme Lipglass Tint ($20.00 for 0.08 fl. oz.) is a new formula launched with the So Supreme collection. There are eight shades in total, all of which are limited edition. They come in click-type tubes with a brush-type applicator. The formula is supposed to have “PH pigments that work with body’s natural temperature to give you a fresh color that’s yours alone.” So, while makeup is inevitably a your-mileage-may-vary proposition, these are even more so (if it helps, my regular body temperature is 96.8 degrees F, yes, 96.8, that’s not a typo!) based on that (and I have no idea what that actually means or how it might work–they seem to tint my lips in some fashion).

The consistency is rather tacky–not quite as tacky as Lipglass and thinner than most Lipglasses–but it was surprisingly tacky. It was also the type of tackiness that developed more and more as the gloss wore on. They also have MAC’s typical vanilla scent (but no discernible taste). Since this is a new type of product, I focused and put the time towards trying these first (which is why the lipsticks will be tested later this week). Their best attribute is that they have a longer wear time from what I’ve tried so far, and they do have a stained effect after two to three hours (the glossiness wears away but the color remains).

However, the longer it wears, the more it migrates and bleeds out of the natural lip line (and I very, very rarely have this issue–even with glossy, vibrant red lipsticks). As it fades away, it fades from the center of the lips first and leaves behind a very obvious ring of color along the outer portion of the lips. The amount of feathering, though, was surprisingly; the color had expanded three milimeters beyond my natural lip line all around my lips. I kind of resembled a toddler who ate a cherry popsicle in a hurry, just slightly more sophisticated. For me, these were also somewhat drying (it was like the cherry on top of an overall disappointing sundae–you know, the one that wasn’t worth the calories!).

Also: I was able to remove the majority of whatever color was left behind with Make Up For Ever’s Aqua’Eyes quite easily, and I would say less than 5% remained, if that. When I tried removing it with a cleansing oil (shu’s) last night, I didn’t have as much luck.

Blushing Berry is described as a “midtonal cool red.” It’s a reddened berry with cool undertones. It had semi-sheer color coverage. This shade wore with most of the color intact for four hours, and then it was more of a ring of stained/tinted color by the fifth hour with significant feathering apparent after three and a half hours that worsened as it continued to wear on. NARS Penny Arcade is not quite as red-toned. MAC Colour Saturation is darker. See comparison swatches.

Bubblegum is described as a “soft warm pink.” It’s a pale pink with subtle warm undertones. When applied, it seemed to turn into a bluer pink, though. It did settle into lip lines, and it was difficult to even this out as it had a milky look and feel. This one darkened considerably on the lips and lost its milkiness within an hour. I did experience some feathering with this shade after three hours, and there was a ring of color after four hours. Edward Bess First Kiss is similar but more opaque. Tom Ford Sugar pink is more neutral. MAC Next Fad is more shimmery. MAC Viva Glam Nicki is brighter, more opaque. MAC Please Me is more opaque. MAC Petite Indulgence is sheerer. See comparison swatches.

Glorious Intent is described as a “warm plum.” It’s a deepened berry with cool undertones. It had semi-opaque color coverage. This shade feathered within the first two hours, and then it worsened over the next three hours that it wore well for (other than the feathering). It left behind that dreaded ring of color after six hours of wear in total. It is a more intense, more opaque version of Blushing Berry. NARS Penny Arcade is not quite as red-toned. MAC Colour Saturation is very similar. See comparison swatches.

Gwi-Yo-Mi is described as a “midtonal raspberry.” It is a slightly muted, medium-dark pink. On my lips, it turns a pinky-raspberry color with semi-sheer color coverage. It seemed to settle into lip lines a bit, too. Revlon Fuchsia Finery is lighter. Revlon Berry Allure is similar. NARS Mexican Rose is pinker. NARS Penny Arcade is similar. MAC Imperial Red is pinker. MAC Colour Saturation is darker. See comparison swatches.

Heart & Seoul is described as a “warm peach.” It’s a light-medium peach with warm brown undertones. On lips, it took on a coral-pink tone with semi-sheer color coverage. It wore well (without feathering or fading) for three hours, and after four hours, there was some feathering and after four and a half hours, the middle area of my lips were without color and there was just an outer ring of color on my lips. Revlon Pink Pop is similar. MAC Kiss & Don’t Tell is lighter, pinker, more opaque. MAC Star Quality is a bit darker, more opaque. See comparison swatches.

Kiss, Kiss is described as a “cool peach cream.” It’s a warm, pinky-coral that turns darker and pinker applied to my lips. It wore well for the first two and a half hours, and then there was noticeable feathering after three and a half hours with a ring of color left on the outer edges of the lips after five hours of wear. Giorgio Armani #519 is brighter, more opaque. MAC Kiss & Don’t Tell is lighter. MAC Star Quality is lighter. MAC Galaxy Rose is darker, cooler-toned. See comparison swatches.

K-Wow is described as a “soft cool pink.” It’s a light-medium, blue-based, milky pink. On lips, it looks like a cotton candy pink with strong, blue undertones. It does settle into lip lines and doesn’t seem to smooth out/even out. Both NARS Coeur Sucre and MAC Pink Nouveau have similar coloring but are both more opaque that they aren’t that similar. See comparison swatches.

Simply Wow is described as a “midtonal cool mauve.” It’s a cool-toned, pink plum. This was one of the better-applying shades, as it had a very smooth, mostly even appearance on. It had semi-opaque color coverage. I wore this one, and it felt like a gloss for three and a half hours, and then it resembled more of a light stain. It feathered around the edges of my lips by the four and a half hour-mark. I noticed a subtle ring of color left behind after five hours. MAC Mall Madness is more shimmery. MAC Call Me Gorgeous is brighter. See comparison swatches.

Hopefully, some of you who have tried these or will try them will share your thoughts and experiences. I’m very curious to see if anyone else has as much trouble!

The Glossover

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product

Blushing Berry

C-
This shade wore with most of the color intact for four hours, and then it was more of a ring of stained/tinted color by the fifth hour with significant feathering apparent after three and a half hours that worsened as it continued to wear on.

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

8/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

4/5

Results
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Bubblegum

D+
When applied, it seemed to turn into a bluer pink, though. It did settle into lip lines, and it was difficult to even this out as it had a milky look and feel.

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

8/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

4/5

Results
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Dupes
LE
product

Glorious Intent

C-
It's a deepened berry with cool undertones. It had semi-opaque color coverage. It is a more intense, more opaque version of Blushing Berry.

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

10/10

Texture

8/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Sunday, July 21st, 2013

Chanel Mystere (43) Les 4 Ombres Eyeshadow Palette
Chanel Mystere (43) Les 4 Ombres Eyeshadow Palette

Chanel Mystere (43) Les 4 Ombres Eyeshadow Palette ($59.00 for 0.24 oz.) is a new and limited edition palette for fall that features shades of “golden khaki, golden ivory, silver taupe, and matte khaki.” This quad is only interesting if you like softer, sheerer neutrals; the color payoff, with the exception of the golden shade, was sheerer, while the texture of all four shades was slightly dry and ranged from slightly powdery to somewhat powdery. As a result, they all look very barely-there applied to the lid, and the colors lost a lot of contrast and dimension as a result. I experienced noticeable fading after six and a half hours, and after nine hours, it was like I hadn’t put on any eyeshadow (I felt like my lids thought the eyeshadow made for a tasty morsel!).

Mystere #1 is a blackened brown with small gold shimmer. It had so-so color payoff, and it was a bit dry and powdery to work with. I applied it using a small crease brush, and it gave more intense payoff but did need some extra patience while blending. Disney Cinders is similar. Bobbi Brown Black Gold has larger shimmer. Guerlain Terra Azzurra #4 is less shimmery. Dior Night Golds #3 is cooler-toned, lighter. Chanel Topkapi is cooler-toned, darker. bareMinerals VIP is cooler-toned. See comparison swatches.

Mystere #2 is a creamy, pale gold with warm, yellow-y undertones and a golden pearl finish. It had good color payoff, and the eyeshadow applied smoothly but was slightly powdery. Chanel Convoitise is yellower, more frosted, cream. Disney Sand in the Glass is warmer. MAC Femme-fi is similar. Guerlain Calligraphy #1 is also similar. Chanel Pearl River #2 is yellower. Buxom Poodle is yellower, cream. bareMinerals Carte Blanche is lighter. See comparison swatches.

Mystere #3 is a subtly warm-toned, medium-dark taupe with a soft sparkle. It was semi-opaque and was a bit dry and powdery. MAC Romance Me is darker. MAC Earthly is browner. MAC Era is similar. Chanel Prelude #3 is slightly grayer. See comparison swatches.

Mystere #4 is a cool-toned, olive brown with a blackened base and green pearl that’s really not noticeable applied. It was sheer and powdery. theBalm Sophisticated is more shimmery. MAC Mystery is darker. See comparison swatches.

It is listed as a U.S. exclusive, but check with your local Chanel artist to verify–my guess is the baked version will be available globally (which is the norm for for the majority of Chanel quads), just not this formula. I don’t know why Chanel has two formulas, and I can’t fathom why they continue to have two formulas when time and time again readers confirm that the baked version is almost always inferior.

The Glossover

LE
palette

Mystere (43)

D+

This quad is only interesting if you like softer, sheerer neutrals; the color payoff, with the exception of the golden shade, was sheerer, while the texture of all four shades was slightly dry and ranged from slightly powdery to somewhat powdery.

Product

7/10

Pigmentation

7.5/10

Texture

7/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

3.5/5

Results
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Mystere #1

C-

Product

7.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

7/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

3.5/5

Results
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LE
product

Mystere #2

C+

Product

8/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

8/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Saturday, July 13th, 2013

Revlon Emerald/Empire PhotoReady Kajal
Revlon Emerald PhotoReady Kajal

Revlon Emerald/Empire PhotoReady Kajal ($8.99 for 0.08 oz.) is a dual-ended eyeliner with a bolder, deeper shade on one end for lining and defining, and then a brightening shade on the opposite end. Revlon says both shades can be applied to the water line as well as the lower lash line and should last all-day long and have a creamy formula. I found both ends to be creamy, nicely pigmented (Empire was fully opaque, while Emerald was mostly opaque), and they glided across the lash line easily without tugging, dragging, or skipping.

I wore both on the lower lash line as well as water line, and both applied with opaque color on the water line well.  The bad news is that I had terrible wear with both shades, but it was most distressing to see Empire dragged out about half an inch past my lash line like I had gone swimming for the past hour and a half, maybe with a few crying fits afterward!  I even had bits of the eyeliner on my actual lid–that’s transfer from the lower lash line onto the lid!  I didn’t see as much bleeding with Empire, but because it blended it out to my skin tone, it was hard to tell; but it had clearly faded/migrated.  NARS’ Kaliste actually looks a lot like Emerald (no, it had the exact same wear, so you can see what I mean!), and I had the same experience with that eyeliner formula as well–and it felt like a dream to apply but was a nightmare to wear.

All of this happened within an hour of wearing them.  I looked at my notes, and I thought, “Well, let’s just test it one more time,” and in fact, I tested both shades twice more today, and I had the same bleeding, smudged wear after an hour or less of wear.  It’s really a shame, because the creaminess, coupled with the rich color payoff, made this an eyeliner I wanted to rave about.

Emerald is a blue-tinted teal with a mostly matte finish–there is a smidgen of micro-shimmer, but it doesn’t appear visible applied (looks matte). MAC Blue Noon is greener. Estee Lauder Dramatic Teal is bluer. See comparison swatches. You can also see additional blue-based teal eyeliner swatches.

Empire is a lightened, warm-toned, light beige with a matte finish. Sephora Blonde Ambition is more shimmery, while NARS Rue Bonaparte is more neutral. See comparison swatches. It would also be comparable to MAC NC15/NW20.

The Glossover

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product

Emerald/Empire

D+

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

9.5/10

Texture

9.5/10

Longevity

1.5/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Emerald

D-

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

9.5/10

Longevity

0.0/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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product

Empire

C-

Product

5/10

Pigmentation

10/10

Texture

9.5/10

Longevity

2.5/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

MAC Pastelluxe Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette
MAC Pastelluxe Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette

MAC Pastelluxe Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette ($40.00 for 0.14 oz.) is described as shades of “bright champagne with pearl, peach pink with pearl, light pink, bright lavender and dusty grey.”  This was the hardest palette to use of the six MAC launched, because four of the five shades had incredibly crumbly, almost gritty, textures that were just so filled with sparkle that the sparkle got everywhere during application, after, and really stuck to the skin.  I initially applied these shades this morning, and after nine hours of wear, most of what was applied on the lid seems to be underneath my eye and on my cheeks.  Even applying all of the shades with a damp brush didn’t give great results on the lid from the get-go.  The only shade that wasn’t a pain to use was #5.  The eye that I wore this palette on was watering all day (and the other one only started watering towards the end).

Pastelluxe #1 is a sparkling, pale gold with a muted quality. It was sheer both wet and dry, and it was difficult to smooth out, so it looked uneven applied. MAF Flicker is lighter. Bobbi Brown Bone is warmer. See comparison swatches.

Pastelluxe #2 is a pale peach that looks more beige applied than it does in the pan. Like #1, it was sheer whether applied wet or dry, and the consistency was very sparkly and kind of crumbly to the touch. Urban Decay Sellout is darker, less glittery. NARS Delphes #1 is less glittery. MAC Light Touch is smoother. MAC Blonde Streak is cooler-toned. MAC Ice is darker. Bobbi Brown Bone is lighter. See comparison swatches.

Pastelluxe #3 is a pastel pink with warm undertones and a metallic finish. Applied dry, it’s mostly just a sprinkling of sparkle, and then applied wet, you can see more color but it is still semi-sheer. MAC Pinkluxe #2 is darker. theBalm Safe Bet Annette is slightly cooler-toned. Urban Decay SWF is darker. Maybelline Inked in Pink is darker, cream product. MAC Cheryl Chic is a bit darker, less metallic. MAC Tuapeless is cooler-toned. MAC Love Power is a touch darker and a cream product. MAC Good Fortune is lighter and a cream product. Chanel Harmonie du Soir 4 is similar. See comparison swatches.

Pastelluxe #4 is a cool-toned lilac purple with gold and white sparkle. It had a very chunky, crumbly texture that was apparent both wet and dry–it went from very sheer to sheer. MAC Dynamic Duo 2 #1 is less metallic. MAC Fresh Ice is lighter, less metallic. MAC Silverwear is lighter, less metallic. MAC Digit is quite a bit lighter and less metallic. See comparison swatches.

Pastelluxe #5 is a dirty taupe with subtle warm undertones and a multi-colored sparkle. This one was particularly pretty as it caught the light and twinkled. Applied dry, it’s a softer, semi-opaque color, while applied dry, it is a bit darker and more opaque, as well as smoother. Urban Decay Midnight Rodeo is warmer. MAC Romance Me is less frosted. MAC Shale is warmer. Bobbi Brown Stormy Grey is warmer, less frosted. See comparison swatches.

The Glossover

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palette

Pastelluxe

D+

Pastelluxe was the worst of the six, as it was incredibly sparkly--these sparkly shades were crumbly, prone to fall out, and difficult to smooth out. They're a bit like the Pressed Pigments in that they really need to be mixed and pressed to smooth out.

Product

6.5/10

Pigmentation

7/10

Texture

6.5/10

Longevity

7/10

Application

4/5

Results
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Pastelluxe #1

D

Product

6/10

Pigmentation

6/10

Texture

6.5/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

4/5

Results
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product

Pastelluxe #2

D-

Product

6/10

Pigmentation

6/10

Texture

6/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

4/5

Results
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Saturday, May 25th, 2013

Clinique Pink and Plenty Chubby Stick Shadow Tint
Clinique Pink and Plenty Chubby Stick Shadow Tint

Clinique Pink and Plenty Chubby Stick Shadow Tint ($16.00 for 0.10 oz.) is described as a “pink with golden sheen.”
Chanel Abstraction is warmer, almost coral-like in comparison. Urban Decay Scratch is warmer, doesn’t have a golden sheen, and is a powder product. Lancome Kitten Heel is lighter but has a golden sheen, and it is also a powder eyeshadow. Make Up For Ever #24E is very comparable. MAC Da BLing doesn’t have the same golden sheen and is a powder eyeshadow. See comparison swatches here.

Clinique Lavish Lilac Chubby Stick Shadow Tint ($16.00 for 0.10 oz.) is described as a “medium lilac.” It’s a smoky plum with a metallic sheen and neutral-to-cool undertones. BareMinerals Chroma Violet is warmer, purpler. bareMinerals Romp is very similar but a powder product. MAC Round Midnight is darker and a powder eyeshadow. MAC Joy & Laughter #2 is slightly lighter and a powder product. MAC Winterized is a smidgen darker and a powder product. NARS 413 BLKR #1 is lighter and a powder eyeshadow. Urban Decay Rapture is purpler and a powder product. See comparison swatches here.

Pink and Plenty was semi-sheer in one stroke, and on the lid, it was a crumbly, flaky mess that was very unflattering on the lid! It made the lid look dry and crepe-y. It tugged at the lid, and in an attempt to even out the color, it clings to itself and doesn’t smooth out well. I wish this was easier to blend, because I could definitely see someone using this as a one-and-done wash of color that adds color and brightens. It “lasted” during the twelve hours I wore it without (further) creasing/fading, but it started off so patchy that it was hard to tell–I just went back the fact it looked exactly the same initially and twelve hours later.

Lavish Lilac was mostly opaque in a single pass, and it applied smoothly and evenly on the lid. The consistency of the pencil is somewhat dry but waxy, so it glides across the lid without tugging too much, but it’s not the creamiest or most comfortable pencil shadow I’ve come across. Like others in the range, it’s also not very blendable–it tends to stay and stick where you’ve applied it, so fading out the edges can take some elbow grease. One trick is to heat up the pencil with a blow dryer or used a similar-colored powder eyeshadow to help diffuse the edges. I didn’t experience any creasing or fading with this shade over the twelve hours I wore it.

The Glossover

P
product

Pink and Plenty

D+

Product

6/10

Pigmentation

8/10

Texture

6/10

Longevity

8.5/10

Application

2.5/5

Results
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Dupes
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P
product

Lavish Lilac

A-

Product

9/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

8/10

Longevity

10/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Dupes

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