Friday, September 16th, 2011

MAC Chromagraphic Pencils
MAC Chromagraphic Pencils: Basic Red, Process Magenta, Hi-Def Cyan, Rich Purple

MAC Fall Colour: Chromagraphic Pencils

MAC Chromagraphic Pencils ($15.00 for 0.04 oz.) are part of the MAC Fall Colour Collection, which debuts in North America on September 29th, 2011 and will roll out internationall in October. Though there is a full range available at PRO stores permanently, we’ll see a limited launch of four shades roll out to all MAC locations, including: Basic Red (primary red), Process Magenta (matte magenta), Hi-Def Cyan (cyan blue), and Rich Purple (dense purple).

I’m a HUGE! fan of the Chromagraphic Pencils! I reviewed them all here when they first debuted at PRO stores in May 2010. They do come with safety recommendations, and for the sake of ease, I’ll repeat the warnings for the four shades featured in this collection.

  • Basic Red is an orange-toned red with good color payoff in a single pass. It is not to be used in the eye area or inner rim of the eye.
  • Process Magenta is a bright, medium-dark fuchsia pink. It has nice color payoff in a single pass. It is not to be used in the eye area or inner rim of the eye.
  • Hi-Def Cyan is a brightened medium-dark sky blue–not quite as bright as true cyan, I’d say. It has great glide and color in one stroke. It is not to be used on the inner rim of the eye.
  • Rich Purple is a medium-dark purple with red undertones. It’s kind of the bum of all the Chromagraphic Pencils; it has a glossier finish and goes on rather unevenly. It is not to be used on the inner rim of the eye (oops–I did this earlier!).

The reason I like the Chromagraphic Pencils so much is they wear well on the water line (though only a few are safe for that area, like Black Black and the flesh-toned shades) in addition to the lash line. They’re creamy enough to glide on effortlessly and the majority of the shades deposit solid color in one pass.

The Glossover

product

MAC Fall Colour: Chromagraphic Pencils Swatches, Photos, Reviews

A
Creamy, pigmented (well, not Rich Purple, which will take a couple of passes to get solid color out of), and long-wearing -- hard not to like these!

Product

9.5/10

Pigmentation

9.5/10

Texture

10/10

Longevity

9.5/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Dupes
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Monday, May 24th, 2010

MAC Chromagraphic Pencils
Pure White, Basic Red, Process Magenta, Genuine Orange, Primary Yellow,
Landscape Green, Marine Ultra, Hi-Def Cyan, Rich Purple, Black Black, NC42/NW35

MAC Chromagraphic Pencils: Review, Photos, Swatches

Last week, MAC PRO launched a full collection of Chromagraphic Pencils. Each retails for $14.50, and all the shades are permanent at PRO stores. This collection is only available at PRO stores, but anyone can shop at a PRO store. You can even call up your nearest PRO store, and you can place a phone order for a flat-rate shipping cost. Keep in mind that these are PRO products, which means they were designed with the makeup artist in mind, not necessarily consumers.

These may seem familiar because MAC released two of the flesh-toned shades with Pret-a-Papier (NC15/NW20 and NW25/NC30). The other eleven shades are new. Chromagraphic Pencils are creamy pencils that glide on easily and smoothly. According to PRO, they are meant for lining and defining, which makes sense as they have other products (like Chroma Cakes and Paint Sticks) more suitable for larger areas.

I do really like the flesh-toned shades for use on the lower waterline to open up the eye. I find that the NC15/NW20 achieves that the best (the others being a bit too dark on me) myself, and I’m about NC25. Black Black is really intense, and it is safe for usage everywhere but the lips, and that’s the one I chose to test-drive first. It stays pretty well on the waterline and lash line – it looks intense and dark from a normal viewing distance, but up close, I can see that it looks a little faded–but it hadn’t faded any more after the initial inspection and stayed on for about six hours for me (on the waterline, over eight on the lash line).

The following shades are not to be used in the lip area: Black Black, Marine Ultra, NC15/NW20, NW25/NC30, NC42/NW35
The following shades are not to be used in the eye area: Basic Red, Genuine Orange, Process Magenta
The following shades are not to be used in the inner rim of eye: Basic Red, Process Magenta, Genuine Orange, Primary Yellow, Landscape Green, Marine Ultra, Hi-Def Cyan, Rich Purple

The darker, more pigmented shades will stain the skin a little if worn for prolonged periods of time. I did not wear the swatches of these for very long, but it took quite a bit of elbow grease to remove them entirely.  I think these are certainly a quick and easy way to put detail on body/face painting efforts.  I’m not necessarily sure how much use most of us would get out of these, though (which is just fine–these weren’t made for us!).

  • Pure White is a crystal clear creamy white.
  • Basic Red is a primary red, subtle orange undertones.
  • Process Magenta is a brightened pink, not quite fuchsia, definitely magenta.
  • Genuine Orange is a rich, almost neon tangerine orange.
  • Primary Yellow is exactly that–bright yellow.
  • Landscape Green is a medium grass green.
  • Marine Ultra is a darkened medium sea blue.
  • Hi-Def Cyan is a creamy sky blue.
  • Rich Purple is a darkened, red-toned purple.
  • Black Black is an intense, almost wet-looking black.
  • NC15/NW20 is a light beige/fleshy shade.
  • NW25/NC30 is a darker version of NW15/NC20. Almost looks like a darkened peach.
  • NC42/NW35 is darker version of NW25/NC30. It looks a bit peachy/orange on me.

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