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Thursday, January 17th, 2008

I have received a few questions lately about what parts of the eye are which, and I thought it would be a good time to re-post this diagram I made last year that I hope is helpful. I always call out where I put each product for every look (because unfortunately, I don’t have time to do a tutorial every time), and when I do, I use the same names for each part of the eye that it is applied to.

Brow Bone/Highlight: Generally, a lighter color will be applied to this area; it may be something that has undertones of bolder colors used on the lid, or it may simply be similar to your skintone. For example, say I do a predominantly green look, I might turn to MAC’s Gorgeous Gold eyeshadow as a highlight color because it will bring out the greens and still allow the color to taper off. Some of my favorite highlight colors are Ricepaper and Shroom.

Above Crease: This is my “blend out” area. There is strong color on the lid and the crease many times, and that strong color needs to be diffused as it moves it way upwards towards the brow. The best way to think about it is as a gradient, going from dark to light, starting on the lid moving towards the brow. Sometimes I use a lighter color than the one I used on my lid to help fade the color upwards, other times I may use the same color I chose for a highlight.

Outer Crease: Luckily my eye was lookin’ a bit tired, because you can really make out the “crease,” which is that fold of skin/wrinkle-like detail you can see. It extends from the beginning of your eye (inside) to the end of your eye (the outside). Most often I deposit color in the outer crease, but sometimes I do bring it inward a touch, more to the “middle” of the crease. I rarely go for darkening the entire length of my crease. A great universal crease color is Carbon, if used lightly, it can darken any look instantly. Soft Brown is also a nice, subtler shade.

Inner Lid: I mentally slice my eyelid into three parts–basically into thirds. There is the inner, middle, and outer thirds. In many looks you will see, a lighter color is put on the inner lid relative to the rest of the colors found on the lid.

Middle of Lid: This is the middle third of the eyelid, and since I typically do similar styles in my looks, this is where a “medium” color in terms of darkness would go. Light, medium, dark is a good way to think of how I deposit and choose what colors go where on the lid. On occasion, I might go medium, light, dark, but not nearly as frequently as I do the former.

Outer Lid: This is the outer third of the eyelid, and this is usually where I put the darkest lid color. Sometimes I will darken the very outermost portion of it (say you split the outer lid third into half, so then it’d be the outer half or the outer sixth of the entire lid) with the same color I would put in my crease.

Upper Lash Line: It is not explicitly labeled in this diagram, but it is where your upper lashes (generally the longest ones, the ones that come from your eyelid) meet your eyelid. This is the actual upper lash line. When lining the upper lash line, many create thicker lines than the natural upper lash line, but the concept is still there.

Upper Waterline: The upper waterline is also not explicitly labeled, but it can be found directly underneath your upper lashes. If you looked up, you would see a tiny bit of space, much like your lower line, and some people line this as well. It is called tightlining, for your reference.

Lower Waterline: The lower waterline is sometimes called the lower rim, because it is essentially the bottom rim of your eye. There are dozens of people who cannot put product on their waterline due to sensitivity, and many others who struggle to find a product that does not fade or dissolve because of the waterline (and the fact that it is…watery!). For those looking for longer lasting products, I know many use gel liners, fluidliners, and some even use liquidlast liners.

Inner Lower Lash Line: Not everyone likes to put color on the lower lash line, which is space directly below the lower waterline. Some prefer just a thin line of eyeliner that expands across both the inner and outer lower lash lines. I often use the 219 brush to apply pops of color; usually, a lighter color that is similar to the colors used on the lids is applied to the inner lower lash line.

Outer Lower Lash Line: Similarly to the inner lower lash line, I again apply a thin line of color using the 219 to the outer lower lash line. There are times where I might even split the lower lash line into thirds, and it just means that there is a middle part of the lower lash line for application. When it comes to smoky eyes, to “smoke out” the look, one applies a darker color to the outer lower lash line or goes for thicker eyeliner and smudges it out around the outer lower lash line.

Upper Lashes: They are not labeled, but I do hope that the majority know where to find these (though explained earlier!). Most makeup users will apply at least one coat of mascara in either brown or black. Brown mascara is more natural and less dramatic, while black can still be natural, but too many coats or using an amplifing mascara will give you dramatic lashes (but hey, I always want these, so there’s no shame in never going au natural on the lashes!). I look up and bring the wand closest to the roots of the lashes and comb it upwards. Sometimes I wiggle, sometimes I turn the brush as I move upwards – it just depends on the mascara.

Lower Lashes: These are the shorter lashes found beneath your eyeball. I always like to give them a quick coat of mascara after I finish doing my upper lashes, because then they’re blacker and stand out a touch. The best way I’ve found to apply mascara to the lower lashes is to use a mascara wand that is not huge and burly – it is a small space, and why do you want to get mascara all over your face? Since I do not even need a super duper mascara, I may use a lesser, but still black, mascara to coat them. Look up and lightly tap the mascara wand to the lashes. I usually just move the wand from side to side, rather than up and down like my upper lashes because I find it coats them to deepen color, slightly lengthen, and that’s all I need.

Thursday, January 17th, 2008

Temptalia Asks You


What do you think is your best facial feature? What makes you enviable? Full, pouty pink lips? Long lashes? Doe eyes?

And everybody has SOMETHING they have to consider the best, so don’t give me any of that “But I don’t have one!” business! Me? I like my eyes! I like the color of them (hazel and green, looks like leopard print!) and the overall shape, too.

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

This is a look from several days ago, whereupon I was attempting to go for a sultry neutral kind of look. I think I actually found a color that I might not be so suited for (not to say it’s so bad I should never be caught dead in it), but it’s the first color I’ve found to be at odds with.  I like it on its own, and I’m trying to not be so critical when it’s on me, ha!  I tried to use products solely from The Originals launch, as a way to show you what you can do with some of the shadows and lip products from it.  But can I just say the highlight of the look is the lip combo?  Has to be one of my faves I’ve done lately!

I used Uppity fluidline on lid as a base, Ochre Style eyeshadow all over lid, Clue eyeshadow in outer crease, Ochre Style eyeshadow above crease, Daisychain eyeshadow on brow, and Feline kohl power on lower lash line. I wore Springsheen blush on cheeks with Dancing Light beauty powder to highlight. I had Twig Twig lipstick with Full On Lust lipglass on my lips.

Continue reading →

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Envision graceful, lapping waves of sea green waters touching a white sand beach strewn with pebbles and sea shells. In the distance, hints of citrus and freesia pique the senses. Laughter and music can be heard coming from the harbor dotted with multi-color wooden boats. You take it all in realizing this is a day you’ll want to relive forever. This is the inspiration for Pure White Linen Light Breeze.

“White Linen has always epitomized casual elegance and the relaxation and happiness we feel in the spring and summer,” says Karyn Khoury, senior vice president of Fragrance Development World Wide, Estée Lauder Companies. “Pure White Linen Light Breeze takes this mood one step further by having even more of a focus on the environment — of the calming Mediterranean seascape. It is a sunnier, more transparent and even more tranquil scent.”

The Fragrance
While Pure White Linen Light Breeze incorporates core elements such as rich rose enhanced by white florals and smooth woods from classic White Linen and Pure White Linen, it was also created with dazzling citrus notes, airier florals, and a sheerer more subtly sexy finish for a scent that is as warm, mesmerizing and sensual as those treasured summer afternoons. An effervescent Darjeeling Tea Note is bathed with the refreshing iridescence of citrus including luscious Italian Bergamot, sparkling White Grapefruit and energetic freshly grated Orange Zest. Watery Kumquat conveys a contemporary carefree playfulness.  A gentle unfolding of colorful Osthmanthus, vivacious Yellow Freesia and sensuous Neroli Petals intertwine with graceful Linden Flowers and rich Centifolia Rose to create a fresh intensely feminine allure. Precious Cedar Wood, rich Teak Wood, and a Soft Skin Accord embellished with a drop of ambrosial Acacia Honey impart a lasting subtle sensuality and that is effortlessly elegant.

EstÄ“e Lauder Pure White Linen Light Breeze will be available at Estée Lauder counters and on www.esteelauder.com beginning January 2008.

  • 1 oz./30ml Eau de Parfum Spray $35.00
  • 1.7 oz/50 ml Eau de Parfum Spray $45.00
  • 3.4 oz/100 ml Eau de Parfum Spray $65.00
  • 6.7oz/200ml Body Lotion $36.00

Also, Estée Lauder will be launching a special edition version of their noted Pleasures fragrance.  Kazumi Yoshida partnered with Estée Lauder to create a unique, limited-edition tribute to pleasures, one of the company’s best-selling prestige fragrances. After experiencing the pleasures fragrance, Yoshida began to repaint his spring designs with pleasures in mind. The result is an inspired work of art for the bottle that invokes a blooming garden and truly captures the simple pleasures in life that are the essence of the fragrance.

View photos of Pure White Linen, as well as Pleasures… Continue reading →

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Temptalia Asks You

Would you be interested in a Temptalia meet-up? I’ve been toying with the idea of having a meet-up of Temptalia readers (and me!) at the San Francisco PRO store sometime.  I’d love to see if anyone would be interested!  And really, it’s okay to say no, you won’t break my heart… much! :)

Tuesday, January 15th, 2008

Sarah has been so generous as to swatch several of the previous mineralize skinfinishes to compare to the two new ones that came out! She also has a few swatches/images of Nanogold and Neutral Pink.

Check them all out! Continue reading →