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Tuesday, March 4th, 2008

I used True Chartreuse pigment on lid, Goldmine eyeshadow on inner lid, Juiced eyeshadow on middle of lid, Swimming eyeshadow on outer lid and crease, Humid eyeshadow on outer crease lightly, Bitter eyeshadow above crease, Ricepaper eyeshadow on brow, Goldmine eyeshadow on lower lash line, and Graphblack techankohl on lower lash line. I wore Hipness blush on cheeks. I had Rozz Revival lipstick with Poetique lipglass on my lips.

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Tuesday, March 4th, 2008

As spring fades away and summer starts to roll in, we want you to have fun and take care of yourself with the additional sun exposure. Over the next several weeks, we will be giving you the low down on sunscreens, self-tanners, and after-sun products from Shiseido to Olay. Today, I want to introduce you to what you should be looking for in a good sunscreen and show you how understand more about your skin, its type, and how dermatologists classify it.

Fitzpatrick Classification of Skin Types:

  • Type I Always burns and never tans (extremely sensitive)
  • Type II Always burns but sometimes tans (very sensitive)
  • Type III Sometimes tans but sometimes burns (sensitive)
  • Type IV Always tans but sometimes burns (minimally sensitive)
  • Type V Always tans and never burns (not sensitive)
  • Type VI Darkly pigmented brown or black skin (not sensitive to sunlight)

The sunlight is most concentrated between late morning to early afternoon (10am to 3pm), so exposure during these hours should be limited and protected. The rays you receive are made up of UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVC is considered harmless as it rarely reaches us (tends to be absorbed by the atmosphere).

An effective sunscreen will protect against both UVA and UVB. Additionally, ingredients such as avobenzone, ecamsule, and zinc oxide are good against UVA; titanium dioxide is good, but it does not cover the entire UVA spectrum. Para-aminobenzoic acid, Para-aminobenzoic acid esters, salicylates, anthranilates, and benzophenones are good for sunscreening (Source).

You can get a full list of FDA approved active ingredients in sunscreens here.

Tuesday, March 4th, 2008

Temptalia Asks You

What is the boldest eyeshadow combo you have ever worn? Just in terms of what you’ve worn, not necessarily the rest of the world! What eyeshadow combo was really noticeable and wow! for you?

Gosh, I couldn’t even tell you! I think I’ve done plenty of blue shadow looks that would count for boldest! Or else my all-black smoky eye :)

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

SamyPure All Natural Smooth & Shine Shampoo/Conditioner ($5.99 each)

Sometimes I am skeptical about natural products, because I haven’t had the best experienes in the past with this genre of products. I am happy to say that SamyPure’s Shampoo and Conditioner system works as well as my last reviewed shampoo set by Herbal Essences. I actually found the shampoo lathered quite nicely! The scent is a pleasing spring-floral blend with just a touch of fruity sweetness underlying it (very, very subtle–not at all overwhelming).

I liked the way it felt in my hair, and it left my hair silky and smooth, which is always desirable (duh). I didn’t notice any change in my normal hair texture (I don’t have any hair problems, so I judge hair products’ effectiveness more on whether they give me hair problems), so I give this set a thumbs up.

I was thinking that it was a salon product, but in fact, it’s a drugstore product. Why did I think it was a salon product? Because it is a 100% Vegan product, which means no animal testing, no animal by-products, etc. I know several readers absolutely abhor animal testing, and some make sure that their products are Vegan-approved.

What’s great about drugstore products is you can often find a detailed list of ingredients and information about them online, like Walgreen’s has everything you need to know about this conditioner.

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Last week, I asked how many of you paid attention to the ingredients list on your beauty products–what was the majority answer? No, not at all; it is not a concern for you. As a beauty junkie, I have (and probably will not any time soon) not become an ingredient wizkid, simply because all of those scientific names never stick in my brain. However, I do think that is it vital to understand the importance of ingredients, especially for those with skin problems. I like to keep certain no-no ingredients in mind when I find a product that works really well, in addition to when I find a product seems to compound existing skin issues.

This guide is by no means a be-all, end-all of cosmetic ingredients, nor is it a full resource on what each ingredient does. I strongly advise you to check my sources, as well as head over to Savvy Skin, run by reader Jeni, because she is a skin care fanatic.

Bad ingredients are pretty much classified as either comedogenic or irritating. Comedogenic means it causes acne (hence why products are touted as non-comedogenic). Based on researching ingredients and the following sites, these ingredients are often found to irritate skin and/or cause acne. When ingredients are tested for their comedogenic or irritating level, they are ranked on a scale of 0-5. 0 means that the ingredent is non-comedogenic and non-irritating, while an ingredient that receives is a 5 is the worst in terms of comedogenic/irritating levels.

It is important to note that people with less sensitive skin may use highly comedogenic or irritating ingredients without any adverse effects. These ingredient lists tend to be more helpful for those that struggle with skin imperfections or troubles, and elimination or reduction of certain known harsh ingredients may inevitably pave the road towards healthier skin. As with all ingredient lists, they are listed in order of amounts–e.g., the first listed ingredient is highest percentage-wise (like water-aqua in 25%) with the last listed ingredient having the least amount percentage-wise (like 0.05%). So if you find a product that you love, and you see it has a potentially irritating ingredient towards the end, it is less likely to be the actual cause of your skin problems. If you use many products that use a particular poor ingredient, even if small amounts on a per product basis, it may add up to a larger dosage overall, though. Keep an eye out!

See a compiled ingredients-to-watch-for list… Continue reading →

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Temptalia Asks You

Are there certain colors/products you won’t use during certain seasons? For example, since it’s spring, do you skip summery colors on the eyes or really bronzed cheeks?

I wouldn’t say I avoid anything, but sometimes I’ll notice something I do is kind of “summery” during a non-summer season or the look is really “fall” like, despite it being summer.

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