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  • Bergdorf GoodmanReceive a gift with any Beauty purchase of $275 or more , ends 1/29.
  • DermStore20% off sitewide with code DSNEWYOU, ends 1/17.
  • Sephora10% off for VIB/VIB Rouges with code V436CB, one-time use per year (valid each year you reach or renew your VIB status), ends 12/31.

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Customer Service is King


Customer Service is King

In today’s world of social media and 24/7 communication, bad customer service stories get around all too easily and then they spread like wildfire.  I’m not sure enough businesses realize that customer service extends beyond prompt shipping and receipt of intact, as-ordered products.  Good customer service is about the total experience:  from the minute I step into your store (or office, retail front, website, etc.) until I’ve come home with my purchases (or service has been rendered).  The older I get, the less tolerant I am of shoddy customer service.  I really do appreciate being treated like a human being, and it is surprising the effect one bad experience can have on your entire view of a business.

I keep seeing some of the same mistakes made by businesses–both large and small–and here is some advice that would make me, as a customer, feel good about purchasing from you:

  • Transparency is underrated.  If there is a problem, please be upfront about it.  If a code is broken, your Facebook app doesn’t work, or you’ve oversold a product, acknowledge it.  Acknowledge the mistake from the beginning rather than attempting to cover it up.  If there is an ongoing problem, consider regular status updates and spend more time providing real information than promises on when something might be fixed if there really isn’t a solid ETA.  You would be surprised at how far the mere act of acknowledgement will go–especially with big businesses that cannot always react as quickly and fluidly as customers would like.
  • Privacy is extremely important.  Keep customers’ personal identifiable information private–it’s personal, and customers are entrusting you with their data and information for a particular purpose.
  • Blaming customers is never the right path.  Sometimes customers can be wrong, but in reality, going on a public form, whether it’s a person’s blog, Twitter, Facebook, etc. is not making the company look good.  Part of the costs of doing business is dealing with bad customers, sometimes cutting them loose because they become too expensive to keep, but also recognizing that for the few bad customers (like the ones who report missing items that weren’t or always do questionable returns), there are many more that are good and honest.
  • Accept bad reviews with grace.  Not everyone is going to love your product/service/business.  If you truly have a good business and feel like you’re doing all the right things, it will show.  Just because one person has a poor experience with your product/service doesn’t mean it will be true of others.  However, if you start harassing people who give you negative reviews, you might find the backlash is far worse than one bad write-up.   After hearing from readers who posted negative reviews on various retailers’ websites and not having them posted (but their positive reviews went through just fine), I became much, much more jaded about the weight and value of reviews on retailer websites.
  • Don’t be afraid to apologize.  Sometimes a forthright, on-time apology is all that is needed or can greatly mollify frustrated customers until something is resolved.  Just don’t abuse it–you can’t keep making the same mistakes and expect an apology to suffice.

We often regale friends and family members with stories of poor customer service, while too often forgetting to recognize incidents of excellent customer service.  We should do both; we should warn others against businesses that practice poor or questionable ethics, fail to address customer concerns and problems adequately and efficiently, and ones that are simply rude or dismissive of customers, but we should remember to give praise to the businesses we love to shop at because of how we feel at the end of the experience.

Feel free to share your tips for excellent customer service or share a story of superior customer service!

What prompted me to write this… 

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Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss Quick

Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss
Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss

Quick Review: Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss

Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss ($30.50 for 0.17 oz.) is described as a translucent formula with no sparkle but “packed with pigments.” It’s non-sticky with a “delicious sheerness.” I gather it should also be moisturizing, given its name. For summer, three shades were released: Tango (09) (flamboyant red), Salsa (07) (neon fuchsia), and Mambo (08) (sunny coral).

The gloss has a lovely jelly-like feel on lips that’s moisturizing; very cushioned and slick without being sticky. It is scented with Guerlain’s signature violet fragrance, and it is one of the stronger scents in higher end makeup, so if you’re particularly sensitive to scents, you might want to sniff first before purchasing. All three shades from the summer launch are shimmer-free with a healthy dose of glossy shine. The color is certainly not sheer, and all three had that translucent quality you’d expect from a gel-like gloss but they do yield quite a bit of color on the lips.

Tango (09) was a semi-opaque pinky red. Salsa (07) was a semi-opaque medium-dark pink. (neon fuchsia), and Mambo (08) was a semi-opaque muted orange. Tango and Salsa looked somewhat similar when worn–there is a difference, but it is not as large when worn than it is when swatched on the skin.

Guerlain Terracotta Terra Inca Moisturizing Gloss Quick

A-
9
Product
9
Pigmentation
10
Texture
8.5
Longevity
4
Application
90%
Total

Wet ‘n’ Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

Wet 'n' Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio
Wet ‘n’ Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

Wet ‘n’ Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

Wet ‘n’ Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio ($2.99 for 0.17 oz.) include shades of yellow, green, and pink.  It is a limited edition trio as part of the summer Dream Weavers Collection.  It’s available at local drugstore retailers, but not all have them and some sold out quickly of their stock so you might have to hunt around your local area for a displayer.

The Browbone shade is a sunshine yellow with a frosted finish. It has great color payoff with a dense texture that’s soft and smooth. It’s a little more golden and muted compared to MAC Bright Sunshine, but they are still rather close; it is also comparable (just a little darker) than MAC Double Feature #1.

The Crease shade is a cool-toned, medium grass green with a pale gold shimmer-sheen. It’s a fun shade, because the base color is cool-toned while the overlying shimmer is considerably warmer. The pigmentation is nice, and the texture is soft so it applies smoothly on the skin. It’s much lighter compared to Wet ‘n’ WIld Earth Looks Small From Down Here as well as Urban Decay Graffiti.

The Eyelid shade is a medium-dark pink with a hint of fuchsia iridescence in the finish. It’s the worst performing shade of the three–not fully pigmented so it applies unevenly (see the patchiness on the left portion of the swatch). The texture was a bit dry and not as dense as the other two shades. The color is similar to Milani Pink Twice. Make Up For Ever #83 is brighter and pinker.

Side note: While I appreciate the concept of identifying which colors go where, I don’t really see the labeling working in this particular trio. This set of colors is hard enough to wear together, let alone with bright yellow all over the brow bone. It could certainly work for a particular look, but overall, it’s a little much. None of this affects the rating, but it’s something I’ve seen more and more brands do. I think it takes away from some of the usefulness of guiding buyers on how to use a certain product. From a more creative stance, I appreciate the interesting pop of green amongst the other two colors (I would have expected copper, brown, or orange).

Wet ‘n’ Wild Bright Idea Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

B+
9
Product
9
Pigmentation
9
Texture
9
Longevity
4
Application
89%
Total

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