Thursday, February 28th, 2008

Note:  This tutorial is a little late, considering it was made in October 2007.  With that said, I want to recommend some substitutions if you didn’t pick up this palette!  For Medallion, try Pink Venus (from Fafi as well as a permanent color); for Trophy Pink, try Post Haste or Passionate; for Modern Heir, try Hepcat or Plum Dressing. Also, I would recommend using a different highlighting color – more neutral, less frosty – as I designed the tutorial to only use the palette colors!

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create a look using MAC’s Royal Assets Cool Eyes palette. Feel free to ask questions!

You will need: Water-based Mixing Medium (glycerin based liquid adhesive), Your Ladyship pigment (frosty white with yellow undertones), Medallion eyeshadow (frosty pale pink), Trophy Pink eyeshadow (bright cool pink), Modern Heir eyeshadow (shimmery purple), and Graphblack technakohl (black liner). For complimenting cheeks and lips: Don’t Be Shy blush (cool pink) and Micro Pink beauty powder (cool pink); Culture Class lipstick (frosty coral-pink) with Contessa lipglass (frosty purple-pink).
Brushes: 239, 239, 249

Get the step-by-step instructions with photos… Continue reading →

Saturday, February 23rd, 2008

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create a look using MAC’s Fafi Eyes #2 Quad. If you have questions, feel free to ask, as the whole point of this is to help you!

You will need: Rollickin’ paint pot (creamy base in a shimmery aqua), Good As Gold eyeshadow (shimmery light gold), You’re Fresh eyeshadow (light pale green), Prankster eyeshadow (chalky gray-blue), Shimmermoss eyeshadow (shimmery medium teal), Freshwater eyeshadow (blue), Malt eyeshadow (matte flesh-toned highlighter), Graphblack technakholl (black kohl liner), Plushlash mascara (black mascara). For cheeks, Hipness blush (bright medium peach-orange) was used; for lips, Strawbaby lipstick (coral-pink) and Sugar Trance lipglass (white with pink shimmer) were used.

Brushes: 239, 249

Get the step-by-step instructions with photos… Continue reading →

Tuesday, February 19th, 2008

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create a look using MAC’s Fafi Eyes #1 Quad. If you have questions, feel free to ask, as the whole point of this is to help you!

You will need: Perky paint pot (creamy base in a light pink), Hey eyeshadow (shimmery light gold-brown), Pink Venus eyeshadow (light medium pink), Howzat eyeshadow (chalky gray), Nice Vice paint pot (dark purple with red undertones), Vanilla eyeshadow (chalky off-white for highlighting), Smolder kohl (black kohl liner), Plushlash mascara (black mascara). For cheeks, Fashion Frenzy blush (bright medium pink) was used; for lips, Flash ‘N Dash lipstick (coral-red) and Cult Fave lipglass (cool medium pink) were used.

Brushes: 219, 239, 249

Get the step-by-step instructions with photos… Continue reading →

Wednesday, February 6th, 2008

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create an easy neutral eye, perfect for work, most occasions, even Valentine’s Day! If you have questions, feel free to ask, as the whole point of this is to help you!

You will need: Cash Flow paint pot (creamy base in an antique gold tone), Goldmine eyeshadow (true gold), Patina eyeshadow (dirty brown-gold), Bronze eyeshadow (dark brown with shimmer), Smut eyeshadow (dark cool brown) Feline kohl power (black kohl liner), Plushlash mascara (black mascara). For cheeks, Margin blush (dark coral-pink) was used; for lips, Russian Red lipstick (red) and Russian Red lipglass (red) were used.

Brushes: 219, 239, 249

Get the step-by-step instructions with photos… Continue reading →

Tuesday, January 29th, 2008

I managed to con my Dad into letting me borrow his video camera (trust me, I had to leave my traincase on deposit) so I could at least give the live tutorial idea try, since that’s what everyone appears to want. I guess it’s okay for a first try, though I’m not too satisfied with the end result so we will see if I do another in the future. I totally winged it – didn’t have the look planned or what I was going to say. I have to say I learned these things, though:

1) Video is entirely UNFORGIVING! I look about 12 without makeup (and why did my hair decide to go wonky shortly after I started?)
2) Naturalish light (aka craptastic white flourescent) is not my best light
3) Never bother with moving my face closer and slanting (unflattering much?)
4) Look more at the camera
5) Don’t use a look you’ve never done as your first video tutorial material!

But at least I learned something from it, so hopefully if/when I do a second one, I can improve by leaps and bounds! :)

If you’re a regular YouTuber, feel free to friend/subscribe, http://www.youtube.com/user/temptalia.

Check out what I used… Continue reading →

Thursday, January 17th, 2008

I have received a few questions lately about what parts of the eye are which, and I thought it would be a good time to re-post this diagram I made last year that I hope is helpful. I always call out where I put each product for every look (because unfortunately, I don’t have time to do a tutorial every time), and when I do, I use the same names for each part of the eye that it is applied to.

Brow Bone/Highlight: Generally, a lighter color will be applied to this area; it may be something that has undertones of bolder colors used on the lid, or it may simply be similar to your skintone. For example, say I do a predominantly green look, I might turn to MAC’s Gorgeous Gold eyeshadow as a highlight color because it will bring out the greens and still allow the color to taper off. Some of my favorite highlight colors are Ricepaper and Shroom.

Above Crease: This is my “blend out” area. There is strong color on the lid and the crease many times, and that strong color needs to be diffused as it moves it way upwards towards the brow. The best way to think about it is as a gradient, going from dark to light, starting on the lid moving towards the brow. Sometimes I use a lighter color than the one I used on my lid to help fade the color upwards, other times I may use the same color I chose for a highlight.

Outer Crease: Luckily my eye was lookin’ a bit tired, because you can really make out the “crease,” which is that fold of skin/wrinkle-like detail you can see. It extends from the beginning of your eye (inside) to the end of your eye (the outside). Most often I deposit color in the outer crease, but sometimes I do bring it inward a touch, more to the “middle” of the crease. I rarely go for darkening the entire length of my crease. A great universal crease color is Carbon, if used lightly, it can darken any look instantly. Soft Brown is also a nice, subtler shade.

Inner Lid: I mentally slice my eyelid into three parts–basically into thirds. There is the inner, middle, and outer thirds. In many looks you will see, a lighter color is put on the inner lid relative to the rest of the colors found on the lid.

Middle of Lid: This is the middle third of the eyelid, and since I typically do similar styles in my looks, this is where a “medium” color in terms of darkness would go. Light, medium, dark is a good way to think of how I deposit and choose what colors go where on the lid. On occasion, I might go medium, light, dark, but not nearly as frequently as I do the former.

Outer Lid: This is the outer third of the eyelid, and this is usually where I put the darkest lid color. Sometimes I will darken the very outermost portion of it (say you split the outer lid third into half, so then it’d be the outer half or the outer sixth of the entire lid) with the same color I would put in my crease.

Upper Lash Line: It is not explicitly labeled in this diagram, but it is where your upper lashes (generally the longest ones, the ones that come from your eyelid) meet your eyelid. This is the actual upper lash line. When lining the upper lash line, many create thicker lines than the natural upper lash line, but the concept is still there.

Upper Waterline: The upper waterline is also not explicitly labeled, but it can be found directly underneath your upper lashes. If you looked up, you would see a tiny bit of space, much like your lower line, and some people line this as well. It is called tightlining, for your reference.

Lower Waterline: The lower waterline is sometimes called the lower rim, because it is essentially the bottom rim of your eye. There are dozens of people who cannot put product on their waterline due to sensitivity, and many others who struggle to find a product that does not fade or dissolve because of the waterline (and the fact that it is…watery!). For those looking for longer lasting products, I know many use gel liners, fluidliners, and some even use liquidlast liners.

Inner Lower Lash Line: Not everyone likes to put color on the lower lash line, which is space directly below the lower waterline. Some prefer just a thin line of eyeliner that expands across both the inner and outer lower lash lines. I often use the 219 brush to apply pops of color; usually, a lighter color that is similar to the colors used on the lids is applied to the inner lower lash line.

Outer Lower Lash Line: Similarly to the inner lower lash line, I again apply a thin line of color using the 219 to the outer lower lash line. There are times where I might even split the lower lash line into thirds, and it just means that there is a middle part of the lower lash line for application. When it comes to smoky eyes, to “smoke out” the look, one applies a darker color to the outer lower lash line or goes for thicker eyeliner and smudges it out around the outer lower lash line.

Upper Lashes: They are not labeled, but I do hope that the majority know where to find these (though explained earlier!). Most makeup users will apply at least one coat of mascara in either brown or black. Brown mascara is more natural and less dramatic, while black can still be natural, but too many coats or using an amplifing mascara will give you dramatic lashes (but hey, I always want these, so there’s no shame in never going au natural on the lashes!). I look up and bring the wand closest to the roots of the lashes and comb it upwards. Sometimes I wiggle, sometimes I turn the brush as I move upwards – it just depends on the mascara.

Lower Lashes: These are the shorter lashes found beneath your eyeball. I always like to give them a quick coat of mascara after I finish doing my upper lashes, because then they’re blacker and stand out a touch. The best way I’ve found to apply mascara to the lower lashes is to use a mascara wand that is not huge and burly – it is a small space, and why do you want to get mascara all over your face? Since I do not even need a super duper mascara, I may use a lesser, but still black, mascara to coat them. Look up and lightly tap the mascara wand to the lashes. I usually just move the wand from side to side, rather than up and down like my upper lashes because I find it coats them to deepen color, slightly lengthen, and that’s all I need.