Thursday, January 17th, 2008

I have received a few questions lately about what parts of the eye are which, and I thought it would be a good time to re-post this diagram I made last year that I hope is helpful. I always call out where I put each product for every look (because unfortunately, I don’t have time to do a tutorial every time), and when I do, I use the same names for each part of the eye that it is applied to.

Brow Bone/Highlight: Generally, a lighter color will be applied to this area; it may be something that has undertones of bolder colors used on the lid, or it may simply be similar to your skintone. For example, say I do a predominantly green look, I might turn to MAC’s Gorgeous Gold eyeshadow as a highlight color because it will bring out the greens and still allow the color to taper off. Some of my favorite highlight colors are Ricepaper and Shroom.

Above Crease: This is my “blend out” area. There is strong color on the lid and the crease many times, and that strong color needs to be diffused as it moves it way upwards towards the brow. The best way to think about it is as a gradient, going from dark to light, starting on the lid moving towards the brow. Sometimes I use a lighter color than the one I used on my lid to help fade the color upwards, other times I may use the same color I chose for a highlight.

Outer Crease: Luckily my eye was lookin’ a bit tired, because you can really make out the “crease,” which is that fold of skin/wrinkle-like detail you can see. It extends from the beginning of your eye (inside) to the end of your eye (the outside). Most often I deposit color in the outer crease, but sometimes I do bring it inward a touch, more to the “middle” of the crease. I rarely go for darkening the entire length of my crease. A great universal crease color is Carbon, if used lightly, it can darken any look instantly. Soft Brown is also a nice, subtler shade.

Inner Lid: I mentally slice my eyelid into three parts–basically into thirds. There is the inner, middle, and outer thirds. In many looks you will see, a lighter color is put on the inner lid relative to the rest of the colors found on the lid.

Middle of Lid: This is the middle third of the eyelid, and since I typically do similar styles in my looks, this is where a “medium” color in terms of darkness would go. Light, medium, dark is a good way to think of how I deposit and choose what colors go where on the lid. On occasion, I might go medium, light, dark, but not nearly as frequently as I do the former.

Outer Lid: This is the outer third of the eyelid, and this is usually where I put the darkest lid color. Sometimes I will darken the very outermost portion of it (say you split the outer lid third into half, so then it’d be the outer half or the outer sixth of the entire lid) with the same color I would put in my crease.

Upper Lash Line: It is not explicitly labeled in this diagram, but it is where your upper lashes (generally the longest ones, the ones that come from your eyelid) meet your eyelid. This is the actual upper lash line. When lining the upper lash line, many create thicker lines than the natural upper lash line, but the concept is still there.

Upper Waterline: The upper waterline is also not explicitly labeled, but it can be found directly underneath your upper lashes. If you looked up, you would see a tiny bit of space, much like your lower line, and some people line this as well. It is called tightlining, for your reference.

Lower Waterline: The lower waterline is sometimes called the lower rim, because it is essentially the bottom rim of your eye. There are dozens of people who cannot put product on their waterline due to sensitivity, and many others who struggle to find a product that does not fade or dissolve because of the waterline (and the fact that it is…watery!). For those looking for longer lasting products, I know many use gel liners, fluidliners, and some even use liquidlast liners.

Inner Lower Lash Line: Not everyone likes to put color on the lower lash line, which is space directly below the lower waterline. Some prefer just a thin line of eyeliner that expands across both the inner and outer lower lash lines. I often use the 219 brush to apply pops of color; usually, a lighter color that is similar to the colors used on the lids is applied to the inner lower lash line.

Outer Lower Lash Line: Similarly to the inner lower lash line, I again apply a thin line of color using the 219 to the outer lower lash line. There are times where I might even split the lower lash line into thirds, and it just means that there is a middle part of the lower lash line for application. When it comes to smoky eyes, to “smoke out” the look, one applies a darker color to the outer lower lash line or goes for thicker eyeliner and smudges it out around the outer lower lash line.

Upper Lashes: They are not labeled, but I do hope that the majority know where to find these (though explained earlier!). Most makeup users will apply at least one coat of mascara in either brown or black. Brown mascara is more natural and less dramatic, while black can still be natural, but too many coats or using an amplifing mascara will give you dramatic lashes (but hey, I always want these, so there’s no shame in never going au natural on the lashes!). I look up and bring the wand closest to the roots of the lashes and comb it upwards. Sometimes I wiggle, sometimes I turn the brush as I move upwards – it just depends on the mascara.

Lower Lashes: These are the shorter lashes found beneath your eyeball. I always like to give them a quick coat of mascara after I finish doing my upper lashes, because then they’re blacker and stand out a touch. The best way I’ve found to apply mascara to the lower lashes is to use a mascara wand that is not huge and burly – it is a small space, and why do you want to get mascara all over your face? Since I do not even need a super duper mascara, I may use a lesser, but still black, mascara to coat them. Look up and lightly tap the mascara wand to the lashes. I usually just move the wand from side to side, rather than up and down like my upper lashes because I find it coats them to deepen color, slightly lengthen, and that’s all I need.

Monday, January 14th, 2008

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create an easy peachy-pink eyeshadow look. If you have questions, feel free to ask, as the whole point of this is to help you!

You will need: Your Ladyship pigment (frosty white with gold undertones), Nanogold eyeshadow (white-gold-peach with shimmer), Modest Tone eyeshadow (fleshy pink), Neutral Pink eyeshadow (rose with plum undertones), Dark Edge eyeshadow (black-gray with gold reflects), Ricepaper eyeshadow (frosty white with gold undertonse), Feline kohl power (black kohl liner), Plushlash mascara (black mascara). For cheeks, Light Flush mineralize skinfinish was used; for lips, 3N lipstick and 2N lipglass were used.

Brushes: 239

Get the step-by-step instructions with photos… Continue reading →

Friday, January 11th, 2008

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to create an easy gold and green shadow look.

You will need: Golden Olive pigment (bright yellow-green), Ochre Style eyeshadow (dirty yellow-brown), Goldmine eyeshadow (gold), Velvet Moss eyeshadow (velvety mossy green), Clue eyeshadow (dark gray-brown), Feline kohl power (black kohl liner), Plushlash mascara (black mascara). For cheeks, Springsheen blush was used; for lips, Rozz Revival lipstick and Full On Lust lipglass were used.

Brushes: 239

Get the detailed step-by-step how-to… Continue reading →

Sunday, December 23rd, 2007

This tutorial is designed to show you step-by-step how to line your upper lash line and wing out the liner subtly, which is typically called a cat-eye. This is a perfect look to wear for the holidays and New Year’s Eve parties that are happening frequently. It is also a great match when you want to go for retro-matte red lips or even an ultra glossy lip. Bold lips are always amazing when paired with such a neutral, natural eye.

You will need: Liquid black liner of your choice (Prescriptives), wash of a neutral, low-shimmer color of your choice (Ricepaper), semi-matte darker brown for the crease (Soft Brown), and highlight color of your choice (Casablanca).

Brushes: 239, 219, 266/209

Learn how I do my liquid liner… Continue reading →

Thursday, December 6th, 2007

This tutorial will walk you through, step-by-step, on how to apply liquid foundation, powder, contour, blush, and highlighting for a semi-dewy face. You may want to peruse my red lips tutorial, as well as brow tutorial. Also, I have done a few face tutorials in the past (you can never have too many, right?): glowy cheeks, and my original face tutorial.

Do let me know what you think, and if this was helpful! (Now, back to studying!) And if you have a TeamSugar account, make sure to show us some love!

You will need:

  • Products: Liquid foundation, concealer, blush of choice, contour color of choice, highlight color of choice
  • Tools: concealer brush (194), buffer brush (182), stippling brush (187), angled contour brush (168), blush brush (150)
  • I used: MAC Face & Body (NC30), Make Up Forever Lift undereye concealer, Afterdusk blush, Sculpt sculping powder, Tenderdusk beauty powder

Now, it is time to build the full-face with all the trimmings… Continue reading →

Friday, November 9th, 2007

This tutorial is designed to walk you through, step-by-step, a gold with red accent eye that is perfect for many occasions, including the winter holiday season.

Skill Level: Beginner

Eyes: Uppity fluidline (true gold), Goldmine eyeshadow (true gold), Creme Royal eyeshadow (frosty white gold), Honeylust eyeshadow (light bronze), Mi’lady eyeshadow (violet and red duo), Ricepaper eyeshadow (highlight), Graphblack technakohl (black kohl liner), and black mascara.
Face: If you’d like to compliment the eyes, use Margin blush (rich coral) on apples of cheeks with Peach Haze beauty powder to highlight and Sculpt sculpting powder to contour cheeks.
Lips: For matching lips, Antiquitease lipstick with Red Romp lipglass
Tools: MAC 249 firm shadow brush, 239 shadow brush, 219 detailed crease brush

Continue reading →