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IT Cosmetics Velvet Luxe Brushes (304, 307, 314, 320, 322) Reviews & Photos

IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush
IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush

No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush ($38.00) is designed as a “flat but wide” brush for cream and liquid foundation application. It’s a medium-sized, dense, dome-shaped foundation brush made out of synthetic fibers. The brush head measured 33.5mm in width, 32.0mm in length, and 17.4mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.2 inches / 18.3 centimeters. IT’s Velvet Luxe range uses incredibly soft synthetic hairs that are as soft as high-end goat hair used by brands like Chikuhodo, Hakuhodo, etc. I liked this best with liquid, medium coverage or greater foundations with satin to luminous finishes, and it will fit in best with someone who tends to apply their foundation in patting and smooth downward (or upward) strokes rather than in circular, buffing motions.
The curved edge fits in well when maneuvering around the nose, underneath the eye, and around the mouth. Personally, I still preferred the No. 302 for liquid foundation.

The brush felt soft in all directions, and it felt like it was moving across the skin as a single entity, so I did not feel the individual bristles when I was using it. It is fairly dense, though the last fourth of the brush, toward the edge, is more tapered and is less dense compared to the base of the brush head, which allows for better diffusing and spreading of liquid/cream products across the skin. It left a streak-free finish behind, so long as it was cleaned every other application; otherwise, the bristles would stick together and start to leave visible streaks behind (true with most brushes, though, when used with heavier liquids and creams!). I had no issues cleaning the brush, and it dried in a reasonable length of time (within half a day). The brush can also work for applying liquid and cream blush/bronzer if you have a larger surface area, but I’d recommend using a bit less than you think you’ll need, as the greater density means it can apply heavier coverage more quickly.

No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush ($48.00) is supposed to be used for all-over powder application. It’s a synthetic, large powder brush that flares out moderately from the base and has a rounded edge that flattens out to a more buffing brush-like edge. It’s like a powder and buffer brush married together, as it is very dense–denser than most of the powder brushes I have. The brush head measured 47.6mm in width, 40.0mm in length, and 47.6mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.7 inches / 19.5 centimeters. For applying something like setting powder all-over, it had a tendency to over-apply, as it was so dense. It also worked well for applying pressed powder foundations if medium or greater coverage was desired.

This is one of my favorite IT brushes I’ve tried, but I tend to use it primarily for buffing powder into the skin, so I might use it when I’m doing a heavier layer of setting powder (often when I’ve used a dewier base), to apply finishing powder all-over, or to lightly buff everything together at the end (with no product on it). As much as I love the feel of buffer brushes, I love when I find long-handled brushes that work similarly as I prefer the longer handle. It is almost impossibly soft; it is as soft as blue squirrel hair brushes (which are the softest that I’ve felt). When the brush skims across the face, it feels like fluid movement; none of the individual bristles are felt against the skin, and I could use it in any direction or motion. The brush isn’t as balanced as others in the line, as there is a bit more weight sitting in the ferrule and brush head, but the curvature of the handle (designed to be ergonomic, and there’s a natural tendency to hold the line like a writing instrument) seems to combat some of the downward pull from the extra weight on one end.

Due to the density and general size, it can be harder to clean and take longer than average to dry. If I just use it with powders and wash it at least once a week, it’s the same effort and energy to clean as other powder brushes, but if I let it sit too long or it gets liquid/cream product on it, I find it takes longer to rinse all of the product and soap out. It’s usually dry the next day for me, but it definitely takes a few hours longer than most.

No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush ($28.00) is for liquid and cream concealer application that is “soft” and “subtle” using “sweeping motions.” It’s a synthetic, medium-to-large-sized flat concealer brush with a slightly domed edge. The brush head measured 10.5mm in width, 15.8mm in length, and 4.8mm in thickness with a handle length of 6.9 inches / 17.2 centimeters. It’s thin without being razor sharp, but it the edge doesn’t taper enough to give really diffused, blended results. I usually had some visible brush strokes, and the size made it best for under eye concealer and larger surface areas (not so great for redness around the nose, spot correcting, etc.). It’s disappointing for blending out concealer; it was best at just patting and spreading a liquid or cream concealer around an area, but I needed to go back in with a fingertip or another tool to diffuse and blend out the edges and hide brush strokes.

While the bristles felt soft, the edges of the brush felt “stabby” against the skin at times, though not consistently. It was the first time I’ve ever felt individual bristles from one of the Velvet Luxe brushes! It is a denser brush, and it is thicker than the average flat, concealer brush, which made it harder to cleanse liquid/cream concealer out of, as they tended to be fuller coverage products. I highly recommend cleaning after each use, as it just gunked up unforgivably if left sitting for a day. It did not seem to take much longer to dry than most synthetic eye brushes (half a day or less). Alternatively, I tried using it with cream eyeshadow, and it did work for that, though there are other brushes I preferedr for cream eyeshadow.

No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush ($26.00) is designed for blending eyeshadow in the crease “using windshield wiper motions.” It’s like an elongated stubby crease brush that came to a rather flat edge–there’s a very, very slight curve but was hard to see in person. It is made out of synthetic fibers. The brush head measured 7.8mm in width, 12.1mm in length, and 7.8mm in thickness with a handle length of 6.8 inches / 17.2 centimeters. I found it most useful for applying rich color into the deepest part of the crease without over-blending or instantly diffusing the color, and secondarily, it was able to blend out color, but it wasn’t as good at blending as it was for depositing and laying down color into the crease (and blending is what it is supposed to be for!). The brush was silky and smooth regardless of direction or application method.

The shape reminded me of a blunter smudging or pencil brush, and it a longer length as well, which gave it some ability to blend out color, as it moved back and forth. As the shape is similar to a pencil brush, it also worked well for applying color underneath the lash line or to blow out the lower lash line with a powder eyeshadow. The synthetic fibers made this workable with cream products into the crease, and that’s a tough job for a lot of brushes; the density and shape of the brush really shined for depositing richer coverage with a cream eyeshadow into the crease. It had just enough give to diffuse the edge of a cream eyeshadow past the crease. When it came to powder products, it carved out the crease well with obvious laydown of color, but I often wanted to go in with a more feathery, fluffier brush for diffusing and blending the crease color upward. I’ve had no issues cleaning the brush, and it dried within a normal length of time.

No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush ($26.00) is touted as an eye brush for sweeping eyeshadow all over the lid. It’s a large, synthetic eyeshadow brush that’s fairly flat and has a fluffier, tapered, dome-shaped edge. The brush head measured 11.0mm in width, 15.8mm in length, and 6.6mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.0 inches / 17.7 centimeters. It worked well for applying eyeshadow all over the lid–exactly as described–and is best for someone who wants an all-over wash of color on the lid. I also liked it for diffusing the edges of cream eyeshadow as well as for blending out under eye concealer (better than the No. 314!).

The brush was soft to the touch, and I never encountered a direction or technique where I could feel individual bristles or any roughness. It’s moderately dense, so it can pack on a decent amount of product by patting it onto the lid. The domed, tapered edge worked well for diffusing eyeshadow into the crease, and it could also be used to blend out the crease area or apply product to the brow bone. If you’re looking for something to pack on two or more colors onto the lid, I would look for something smaller, but for a wash of color or packing on medium to full coverage eyeshadow onto the lid, this worked well. It cleaned easily and dried in a normal length of time.

IT Cosmetics   No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush
14
Product
14
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
95%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush
13
Product
11
Fitness
5
Durability
4.5
Construction
84%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush
11
Product
9
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
73%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush
11
Product
11
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
80%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

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Kat Von D Lock-It Concealer, Foundation, Precision Powder, Setting Powder Brushes Reviews & Photos

Kat Von D Lock-It Concealer Brush
Kat Von D Edge Lock-It Concealer Brush

Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush ($24.00) is supposed to blend out under eye concealer and help apply concealer onto blemishes. It is a medium-sized under eye/concealer brush that is dense and thicker than the average brush, and it has a triangular taper on the wider edge, which is what enables it to fit well underneath the eye and along the edge of the nose (by the eye area). The edge is a few millimeters in width, and this is the best aspect of the brush, I think, as it manages blending and diffusing of the under eye concealer up to the lash line without streaking over any eyeliner, as you can get a very soft, gradual edge that meets the eyeliner instead (for those who apply their eye makeup first).

The brush head is 14.50mm in width, 15.00mm in length, and 8.50 mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.00 inches / 18.00 centimeters. It is made out of synthetic bristles and has a glossy black, acrylic handle with a thick ferrule that tapers to a fine point at the end and carries more weight toward the brush head. I find the composition of the Lock-It brushes to have an uneven weight distribution, but it is only noticeable during application with the larger brushes and less so with this one. The greater density makes it harder to clean than some brushes, but it doesn’t take much time nor does it take an extraordinarily long time to dry. The bristles are silky, smooth, and never feel rough or harsh in any direction. It worked well for evenly distributing and spreading out under eye concealer (both liquids and creams) without causing the concealer to become streaky, but it did seem to soak up a fair amount of product and would need to be cleaned each use, if used as an applicator as well as blending tool. I tended to favor it more for blending out concealer, which I tend to dab and spread with whatever brush I’ve used for liquid foundation, to get the concealer closer to the lash line and diffuse it softly along the edges so there are no obvious lines.

Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush ($34.00) is meant for applying and blending liquid and cream foundations while getting into the contours of the face. It’s a medium-large-sized liquid foundation brush that is rectangular in overall shape with edges that flare outwards from the ferrule. What makes it a more interesting brush shape is that the wider side of the brush comes out and then has a triangular wedge or dent that goes in and gives it a more pyramid-like shape. It is similar to the Concealer brush, but the indentation and shape are more noticeable and distinct in the foundation brush.

The brush head is 35.00mm in width, 26.00mm in length, and 21.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.50 inches / 19.00 centimeters. The brush uses synthetic fibers and a glossy black, acrylic handle that has significant weighting toward the ferrule and brush head, so it feels top-heavy in my hand compared to the average brush (this is one of the few things I wasn’t keen on). It is a dense brush, which I tended to double-cleanse to bring it back the white bristles, but the drying time seemed average. The fibers felt soft, smooth, and silky against the skin, and it could be used in all directions, but it is a brush that is best suited for those who apply their foundation in downward, outward, or upward strokes, rather than in circular or buffing motions. It does a good job of spreading foundation and evening out liquid and cream formulas.

Lock-It Precision Powder Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Precision Powder Brush ($32.00) is supposed to work for setting under eye concealer. It’s a medium-sized, flatter, dome-shaped brush with a light-medium density and even shape. It looks more like a blush brush than a brush one might think to use around the eyes, but it is actually quite good at applying and patting under eye concealer into place without disturbing the concealer much. It seemed slightly too dense for really sweeping and diffusing loose powder underneath the eye, so I had to be more careful with how much powder was on my brush.

The brush head is 2500mm in width, 35.00mm in length, and 14.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.85 inches / 20.00 centimeters. It is made out of synthetic fibers and paired with a glossy black, acrylic handle that is thicker at the ferrule and tapers to a much finer point. The balance is off, as quite a bit of weight is shifted toward the ferrule and brush head, which is less comfortable in the hand. I also tried using this with powder blushes and highlighters, and it picked up product decently but didn’t apply as well as true blush brushes (color and shimmer were somewhat uneven when I used this).

(Am I the only one who thinks “Precision Setting” would have been a better name for this? The name and shape instantly said “Blush!” to me.)

Lock-It Setting Powder Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Setting Powder Brush ($38.00) is designed for use with loose powder to give a “soft, diffused veil of powder.” It is a large powder brush with a more spherical shape–it flares out from the ferrule but then tapers to a more rounded point. Where the black bristles become white, there’s a floppiness from there that is a bit heavy on the face and results in a lot less control. I think the brush shape is far too tapered for buffing, so it only worked for lightly sweeping, but the rounded shape resulted in less surface area and a longer application time. It’s more like a Goldilocks of a brush; not fluffy enough for really diffused, all-over setting powder application but not dense enough for patting powder into place for better setting power, while being too tapered for buffing but too round for patting. I liked it for lightly dusting a finishing powder or a subtle highlighter along the high planes of the face (but it does not work with really intense highlighters, as it is too dense, for subtle, all-over glow).

The brush head is 30.00mm in width, 49.00mm in length, and 30.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 8.50 inches / 21.50 centimeters. It is made using synthetic fibers with a glossy black, acrylic handle with its thickest point around the ferrule and comes to a much narrower tapered point at the end. The weight distribution is noticeably in the ferrule and brush head, which makes it less balanced in the hand. The brush felt soft, silky, and smooth against the skin and never felt scratchy, no matter the direction or technique I used with it.

Kat Von D   Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush
13
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
4.5
Construction
90%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush
14
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
95%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Precision Powder Brush
13
Product
13
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
88%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Setting Powder Brush
12
Product
12
Fitness
5
Durability
3.5
Construction
81%
Total

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Smith Cosmetics Eye & Lip Brushes Reviews & Photos

Smith Cosmetics Brushes
Smith Cosmetics Brushes

Smith Cosmetics 202 Microliner Brush ($16.00) is an ultra-fine pointed liner brush. It’s made out of synthetic sable bristles, and it’s firm brush that flexes enough to line along the curve of the upper lash line but it moves together as one so there is no streaking or visible brush strokes. The brush has a total length of 6.00 inches / 15.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 1.00mm width, 5.50mm length, and 1.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). If you work with a lot of gel and cream eyeliners, I could see this being very useful for precision work and very fine lines. If you tend to do thicker eyeliner, you’ll likely want to opt for a thicker brush overall (you can layer and build out your liner with this one, it’ll just be faster for a more appropriately-sized brush). What I found impressive was that it didn’t feel sharp or pokey, even with the tip of the brush against the lash line, so you can really get between lashes, if desired.

Smith Cosmetics 203 Micro Angled Liner Brush ($23.00) is a very short, thin angled eyeliner brush. It is made out of synthetic sable hair and can be used with gels, creams, and powders. The brush has a total length of 6.00 inches / 15.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 6.00mm width, 4.50mm length, and 1.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). Like the #202, this is best suited for precision work, details, and very thin and fine lines. It’s a firm brush that moves together, so while it gives enough to line along the curve of the lid, it doesn’t splay or leave noticeable brush strokes or draggy edges. You can achieve some really fine, natural brow hairs when used with a gel brow product, too. The brush was smooth, never sharp or pointed, against the skin.

Smith Cosmetics 205 Angled Liner Brush ($20.00) is a firm, medium-sized angled eyeliner brush. It is similar in the overall feel, application, and consistency as the #202 and #203; it is just larger than the #203–it is longer and thicker but the angle is the same for both. It is made out of synthetic sable hair and can be used with gels, creams, and powders. The brush has a total length of 6.10 inches / 15.70 centimeters, and the brush head was in 7.50mm width, 6.00mm length, and 2.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). The bristles moved together, which resulted in even, smooth coverage that didn’t appear streaky or show brush strokes. It didn’t feel sharp or poke against the lower or upper lash line, and it was comfortable to use.

Smith Cosmetics 212 Tightliner Brush ($18.00) is a firm, rectangular brush with a flat edge that is designed for applying product to the inner rim of the eye. It is made out of synthetic sable hair and can be used with gels, creams, and powders. The brush has a total length of 6.00 inches / 15.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 6.50mm width, 5.00mm length, and 2.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It is slightly smaller compared to the #205 but has a similar thickness as well as overall feel and usability. The bristles felt soft and smooth, and they moved together, so I didn’t feel any individual bristles while using it, which made it more comfortable to use against areas like the upper and lower lash line. For the upper lash line, I liked pushing motions rather than sweeping or pulling motions. This brush was stiffer and less flexible compared to the other three liner brushes.

Smith Cosmetics 214 Spoolie Brush ($16.00) is a large, bent spoolie brush. It’s longer (almost double the length) of most spoolie brushes, and the ferrule is bent at an angle. The brush has a total length of 7.25 inches / 18.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 6.00mm width, 38.00mm length, and 6.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). I could see this working better for artists when using it on a client, but I was surprised by how much I liked using it on myself as well. The spoolie itself was much softer, without being ineffective, than some others I own, so it worked well to diffuse and soften my brows (particularly the inner portions, closest to the nose) for a more natural look (though I like my brows stronger than what I imagine is deemed natural!). It’s also nice for shaping and convincing brow hairs to stay in place. It’s actually my new favorite spoolie brush for its length and angle!

Smith Cosmetics 220 Eyeshadow Finishing Brush ($24.00) is a medium, rectangular eyeshadow brush with a flat edge and very faint flaring from the ferrule. It is made out of synthetic mongoose hair, and it is designed to be used with powder products for blending and buffing eyeshadow out. The brush has a total length of 6.90 inches / 17.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 16.00mm width, 12.00mm length, and 4.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). This was one of the brushes I was most curious about as I have not personally used a brush like it for makeup. It’s incredibly soft and smooth with a denser base that gets less dense and has most of its flexibility towards the edge (right where the brush hairs become a darker brown). I liked it for blowing out eyeshadow on the lower lash line, as it fits well but gives a really diffused edge with little work. It also worked in place of a traditional blending brush, particularly for areas like the crease, transition, and above the crease to pull and diffuse color towards the brow bone.

Smith Cosmetics 230 Quill Crease Brush Small Brush ($24.00) is a small, rounded crease brush that doesn’t flare out much from the ferrule. It is made out of goat hair and is designed to be used with powder products. The brush has a total length of 6.90 inches / 17.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 16.00mm width, 12.00mm length, and 7.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). The goat hair used in the crease brushes seemed softer to me than what was used in the face brushes. It worked well for applying more intense color into the very depths of the crease for me, which gave a more precise, defined lay down of color. For someone with smaller eyes, it could function the way more common creases brushes do without applying color far past the crease area. Of all the brushes from Smith, this one (along with the #232) didn’t retain its shape as well after washing, so they became more rounded and less pointed after the first wash.

Smith Cosmetics 232 Quill Crease Brush Large Brush ($24.00) is a medium-sized, rounded crease brush that flares out more noticeably from the base and comes to a more rounded edge. It is a bit fluffier along the edges while being slightly denser compared to the #230. The brush has a total length of 6.90 inches / 17.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 10.00mm width, 19.00mm length, and 10.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It has a much wider edge, so it can apply colors with a more diffused finish (I recommend starting with less product if you want a really diffused look), and I liked it for blending out crease colors or taking a transition color through the crease area. I’m also a fan of using rounded crease brushes like this for applying color to the brow bone and along the inner corner/bridge of the nose area. It was similar in softness to the #230, but due to the fluffier edge, it wasn’t as smooth when I used it in circular motions.

Smith Cosmetics 235 Flat Quill Crease Brush ($24.00) is a medium-to-large-sized eye brush that flares out from the base to a more triangular shaped edge with tapering bristles that come to a soft point. It is made out of goat hair and is designed for powder products. The brush has a total length of 6.90 inches / 17.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 11.00mm width, 18.00mm length, and 8.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It’s like a flattened, more pointed version of the #232, so you can distribute more precise color through the crease but the tapered, less dense edges improve blendability and diffusion of color than compared to the #230. The shape of it also works well for most instances of blending of eyeshadow as well as applying color above the crease and on the brow bone. It was soft with a minimal feel of individual bristles, and it didn’t poke or feel rough in any direction for me.

Smith Cosmetics 247 Flat Round Crease Brush Brush ($24.00) is a slimmer, medium-sized eye brush with a lightly rounded edge. It is made out of goat hair and is to be used with powder products. The brush has a total length of 6.90 inches / 17.50 centimeters, and the brush head was in 10.00mm width, 16.00mm length, and 6.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It’s longer than most blending brushes, and it is denser with less flexibility and give, even at the edge. The bristles felt soft and didn’t poke at me in any direction. The shape is interesting as it is rather thin and sharper than most crease brushes, so it can be used to apply color directly into the crease and then lightly blended. I liked it more for depositing color into the crease or on the brow bone than for blending, as it didn’t diffuse as much as I preferred.

Smith Cosmetics 302 Lip Brush ($20.00) is a slim, angled lip brush that’s firm with slight flex at the rounded edge. It is made out of synthetic sable hair and can be used with cream and liquid products. The brush has a total length of 6.25 inches / 16.00 centimeters, and the brush head was in 7.50mm width, 8.00mm length, and 3.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). I can’t recall having a lip brush like this before, as it’s thicker and has a gradual angle and roundedness to the edge. It is very effective for feathering color on, and it works well for creating ombre lips as you can really diffuse and blend colors together. The brush head is firm with minimal flex but isn’t overly stiff to get the job done. I liked it best in sweeping, pulling motions to diffuse lip liner or applying lipstick onto the lips.

Smith Cosmetics 304 Detailed Lip Brush ($18.00) is a small, dome-shaped, flat lip brush. It is made out of synthetic sable hair and can be used with liquid, cream, and powder products. The brush has a total length of 6.00 inches / 15.60 centimeters, and the brush head was in 6.00mm width, 6.00mm length, and 1.50mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It’s a smaller take on the average lip brush, and it is very flat and firm, with just the edge of the bristles having any flex. As a result, the edge of the brush can be used to line the lips and define the cupid’s bow. The edge is firm without being sharp or pokey, even on the eyes. The brush moves as one, so the edges look clean and crisp.

Smith Cosmetics is a newer brand that primarily makes makeup brushes but is also well-known for their Smithfolio, which is a storage system that includes pages that can hold makeup brushes, glosses, liners, zippered bags, etc. that are held in a zippered binder. I was more curious about their brushes after watching a video the brand did earlier this year, as I liked their approach to creating and releasing brushes–they specifically looked for gaps in the market or ways to improve and tweak certain types of brushes. There seemed to be a really careful thought process to the whole range of brushes. All of their brushes feature a copper ferrule and antibacterial-coated, stained wood handle (one piece of wood, not wood chips).

They’re a Canadian brand, so shipping to the U.S. is around $10, but my recent order of three additional brushes and Smithfolio came very quickly (overnight) via DHL, which was impressive. They just announced free shipping from August 1st through August 20th, worldwide, so I wanted to do my best to review the brushes I had from them before that promo is up!

Smith Cosmetics   202 Microliner Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   203 Micro Angled Liner Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   205 Angled Liner Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   212 Tightliner Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   214 Spoolie Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   220 Eyeshadow Finishing Brush
13.5
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
93%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   230 Quill Crease Brush Small
12
Product
14
Fitness
4
Durability
4
Construction
85%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   232 Quill Crease Brush Large
12
Product
14
Fitness
4
Durability
4
Construction
85%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   235 Flat Quill Crease Brush
12
Product
14
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
88%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   247 Flat Round Crease Brush
13
Product
13
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
90%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   302 Lip Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   304 Detailed Lip Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

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Smith Cosmetics Face & Cheek Brushes Reviews & Photos

Smith Cosmetics Brushes
Smith Cosmetics Brushes

Smith Cosmetics 112 Bronzer Brush ($32.00) is smaller cheek/face brush that flares out from the ferrule to a lightly tapered, rounded shape. It looks more like traditional highlighting brushes than the typical bronzer brush. It is made out of black goat hair and designed to give “soft, diffused color.” The brush has a total length of 7.90 inches / 20.00 centimeters, and the brush head was 20.00mm in width, 33.00mm length, and 20.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). I’ve always found this type of shape versatile for applying color to the face with a bit more precision and better for blending as it can buff and diffuse color easily. It applied powder products (bronzer, blush, highlight) well with moderate pick-up and blended them without a fuss. The bristles were somewhat soft, but they are not as silky or as smooth compared to the goat hair used in my Chikuhodo, Hakuhodo, Rae Morris, Tom Ford, or Wayne Goss but is softer than MAC face brushes. The brush did not irritate or bother my skin, however, and the bristles more readily grabbed color from firmer pressed powder products (conversely, anything really soft and powdery already may kick up even more excess product if you don’t use a light touch with this brush).

Smith Cosmetics 115 Foundation Brush ($28.00) is a dense, more rectangular-shaped brush that flares out moderately from the base and rounds at the edges, while the depth of the brush is more lightly rounded and flatter (good for patting/tapping/buffing motions). It contains a mix of goat hair and synthetic fibers, and what makes it more unique is that the bristles are the same length, so it is not like a lot of the natural/synthetic blend stippling brushes you’ll find on the market. The brush has a total length of 7.75 inches / 19.50 centimeters, and the brush head was 32.00mm in width, 26.00mm length, and 19.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It is recommended for use with all types of products from liquid to powder. For liquid foundation, it did soak up a little more product than a fully synthetic brush (that’s as expected), but it spread foundation out well and didn’t leave behind a streaky finish. It can lightly buff liquid and cream products into the skin without sheering or moving the product around too much. The brush was less forgiving if it wasn’t cleaned after two uses (or one use, if it was full coverage), as then the foundation left on it would cause the bristles to stick together and leave a streaky finish (some brushes are more forgiving than others in this aspect). For applying powder products, due to the high density, it will pack a punch, so it is good with less pigmented products The overall feel of the bristles is much softer and smoother–it feels more like they move together as one–than the #112. Again, not as soft as a lot of my Japanese-type brushes but not irritating or rough on the skin.

Smith Cosmetics 118 Blush/Powder Brush ($32.00) small-sized, moderately dense powder brush that flares out from the base and creates a rounded, slightly dome-shaped edge. It contains a 50/50 mix of goat hair and synthetic fibers (of matching lengths) that can be used with liquids, creams, and powders for “blending and building blush and powder.” The brush has a total length of 8.00 inches / 20.50 centimeters, and the brush head was 34.00mm in width, 35.00mm length, and 24.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). If you have found most powder brushes to be too large for your face or preference, this might be a good option as it is one of the smaller powder brushes I’ve seen–it is more in line with average to slightly larger blush brushes. With a light tap into a blush, this gives a soft, diffused look that is easily blended out in soft, sweeping motions, pulling the brush against the face. I could feel some of the individual bristles a little bit if I used more patting or tapping motions, so I did find I preferred more sweeping, feathery motions for applying and blending out. It worked well with finishing powders when I wanted better coverage, as the smaller brush ensured I applied a bit more and was able to concentrate application on smaller areas. For my face shape, size, and personal preference, it was larger than ideal for blush and smaller than ideal for powder, but I think it could be a sweet spot in size for others. It had a similar softness to the #115, where most of the bristles moved together as one when swept and pulled across the face; I felt some individual bristles when tapping or patting with the top edge of the brush.

Smith Cosmetics 122 Highlighter Brush ($24.00) is a short, dense, dome-shaped brush designed for applying and blending out highlighters. It is made out of pony hair and recommended for use with liquids, creams, and powders. The brush has a total length of 7.00 inches / 18.00 centimeters, and the brush head was 22.00mm in width, 13.00mm length, and 9.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). If you like to highlight with precision, and you tend to like your highlighter moderate to intense in coverage/shimmer-level, this brush definitely works well for creating that type of look. It is incredibly dense, firm with some flex (enough that it can maneuver along the curves of the face and but doesn’t splay or lose its shape). The brush felt soft and smooth when patting highlighter onto the cheek bones as well as when smoothing and blending out the color by pulling the brush across the skin. I particularly liked this style and shape of brush for applying cream and liquid highlighters, as I was able to get greater precision and managed to retain better coverage than I normally get when I use stippling brushes. It can be too dense and create a very intense highlight when used with very pigmented highlighters (think Anastasia or Becca), which will not be everyone’s preference. The brush does a good job of blending out intense highlighters, but I find a less dense, feathery highlighting brush does the job faster as it doesn’t over-apply to begin with. So, if you prefer more subtle highlighting, I’d look elsewhere, but if you want a concentrated, moderate to intense highlight, this is superior to typical highlighter brushes.

Smith Cosmetics 124 Contour Brush ($24.00) is a short, angled brush with rounded edges designed for applying and blending out contours. It is made out of pony hair and recommended for use with liquids, creams, and powders. The brush has a total length of 7.25 inches / 18.30 centimeters, and the brush head was in 20.00mm width, 15.0mm length, and 11.00mm thickness (at its widest/longest points). It is very similar in overall size and quality to the #122 with the major difference between the angle and roundedness along that angle that gives it more of the look you’d expect from a contour brush. That being said, it is much, much smaller than even some of my smaller contour brushes with a stronger angle and is much denser. The smaller size and greater density make it ideal for laying down precise contour or navigating on smaller features and faces. It took some getting used to, because initially, I overapplied just about every product I tried using with it! Once I played more and adjusted my application, I was able to achieve softer, smoother contours that weren’t overly blown out beyond where I really wanted the contour color to be. It was easier to use with liquids/creams compared to more pigmented powder products as it was a denser brush. I also liked this brush for applying liquid foundations around the nose and underneath the eyes, as the contoured, smaller shape fit well into the nooks and crannies of my face. The brush felt soft, smooth, and didn’t irritate my face; the pony hair is not as soft as the best goat or squirrel hair, though (I find the pony hair used by Smith to be as soft as the goat hair used, sometimes seemingly softer).

Smith Cosmetics is a newer brand that primarily makes makeup brushes but is also well-known for their Smithfolio, which is a storage system that includes pages that can hold makeup brushes, glosses, liners, zippered bags, etc. that are held in a zippered binder. I was more curious about their brushes after watching a video the brand did earlier this year, as I liked their approach to creating and releasing brushes–they specifically looked for gaps in the market or ways to improve and tweak certain types of brushes. There seemed to be a really careful thought process to the whole range of brushes. All of their brushes feature a copper ferrule and antibacterial-coated, stained wood handle (one piece of wood, not wood chips).

They’re a Canadian brand, so shipping to the U.S. is around $10, but my recent order of three additional brushes and Smithfolio came very quickly (overnight) via DHL, which was impressive. They just announced free shipping from August 1st through August 20th, worldwide, so I’m doing my best to review the brushes I have from them before that promo is up.

Smith Cosmetics   112 Bronzer Brush
12
Product
14
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
88%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   115 Foundation Brush
12
Product
12
Fitness
4.5
Durability
4.5
Construction
83%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   118 Blush/Powder Brush
12
Product
14
Fitness
4.5
Durability
4.5
Construction
88%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   122 Highlighter Brush
14
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
94%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   124 Contour Brush
13.5
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
93%
Total

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Smith Cosmetics 253 & 256 Laydown Eyeshadow Brushes Reviews & Photos

Smith Cosmetics 256 Laydown Brush Large
Smith Cosmetics Laydown Brushes: Small | Large

Smith Cosmetics is a newer brand that primarily makes makeup brushes but is also well-known for their Smithfolio, which is a storage system that includes pages that can hold makeup brushes, glosses, liners, zippered bags, etc. that are held in a zippered binder. I was more curious about their brushes after watching a video the brand did earlier this year, as I liked their approach to creating and releasing brushes–they specifically looked for gaps in the market or ways to improve and tweak certain types of brushes. There seemed to be a really careful thought process to the whole range of brushes. I’ve been testing a lot of the brushes in the range, which I hope to review at some point, but there are two that have fully captured my attention (so much so that I purchased multiples, along with the Smithfolio, after trying them). All of their brushes feature a copper ferrule and antibacterial-coated, stained wood handle (one piece of wood, not wood chips).

They’re a Canadian brand, so shipping to the U.S. is around $10, but my recent order of three additional brushes and Smithfolio came very quickly (overnight) via DHL, which was impressive. They actually just announced free shipping from August 1st through August 20th, worldwide.

Smith Cosmetics 253 Laydown Brush Small ($21.00) is designed to be used for powder products and uses pony hair. The brush has the following dimensions: 6.25 inches / 16 centimeters in total length; brush head is 7.75mm in width, 4.00mm in thickness, and 11.5mm in length. It’s a smaller eye brush with a triangular shape with tapering bristles as you move away and down from the point of the brush. While not quite as silky-smooth in feel compared to high and luxury-end goat-haired eye brushes, it felt very soft and never poked or scratched the skin on and around my eyes (it was softer than my go-to MAC 239). The tapering of the bristles makes it particularly excellent for blending and diffusing colors into each other, particularly when applied on the lid.

It was moderately dense without being firm or inflexible, which made it great for packing and laying down color (real surprise, given its name, I’m sure!). I found that the 253 picked up product really well–sometimes too well, if it was a more powdery and pigmented product–and was a great way to use firmer-pressed powders without having to dig and jab at them. Again, it seemed like the tapered bristles made it so more of the brush was getting brushed across the pan’s surface and therefore more product is getting picked up. The brush is thick enough that the edge can be used to apply color into the crease, and the tapered, smaller size of this particular brush also makes blending out crease colors possible. The triangular shape is one of the reasons I fell in love; it fits so well into the inner and outer corners for more precise lid color placement, while the tapered edge makes it easy to diffuse one color into the next and just above the corners for a more seamless eyeshadow look.

Smith Cosmetics 256 Laydown Brush Large ($23.00) is designed to be used with powder products and uses pony hair; it is a larger version of the 253. The brush has the following dimensions: 6.8 inches / 17.2 centimeters in total length; brush head is 10.00mm in width, 4.75mm in thickness, and 14.00mm in length. Against my skin, the brush felt very soft and smooth without any bristles that poked or scratched at the skin. I enjoyed using this brush a lot for diffusing colors after I placed eyeshadow onto the lid, and it worked well for applying color to the brow bone as well as blending transition shades from crease toward the brow bone. It can be used in the same manner as the 253–placing color on the lid, applying color to the crease, and blending out color on the lid or in the crease–but its larger size made it better for placing one or two colors on my eye due to the size/shape of my lid. I’d actually love to see a Medium version of this style of brush.

Smith Cosmetics   253 Laydown Eyeshadow Brush Small
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Smith Cosmetics   256 Laydown Eyeshadow Brush Large
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

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Wayne Goss The Air-Brush Review & Photos

Wayne Goss The Air-Brush
Wayne Goss The Air-Brush

Wayne Goss The Air-Brush ($35.00) is a powder brush designed for sculpting, buffing, and baking. It is made out of blue squirrel hair, which are some of the softest natural hairs I’ve come across. It is a flatter, tapered cheek and face brush that’s small-to-medium in size; it’s not so small that it is only useful for precision work, as it can easily be used to apply products like blush and bronzer, but it is smaller than the average blush brush (though I find it more in line with the size of more Japanese-branded cheek brushes, like Chikuhodo Cheek/Highlighter and SUQQU Cheek). It’s 22mm in width, 35mm in length, and 14mm in thickness with a total length of 7.75 inches / 17 centimeters.

The brush felt silky-smooth against the skin; I couldn’t feel the individual bristles moving across the skin at all. It had moderate density and a fair amount of flexibility, so it can absolutely be used to buff in a powder product or to lightly sweep it on, which made it a more versatile brush overall. Personally, I liked it best for applying cheek products like highlighters, blushes, and bronzers, or else lightly patting loose setting powder under the eye (the softer hairs help minimize disturbing any concealer underneath the eye); it is a smaller version of Hakuhodo G5545, which is a brush I use regularly for applying cheek colors as it lays down color well as well as blends out powders nicely. The way the bristles taper really helps to diffuse color more gradually across the skin, giving a more blended result without a lot of effort. It can be used to contour as the narrower edge can be held underneath the cheek bone, and then the tapered edge can be used to blend out the contour. I still find an angled contour brush (which is more traditional) is more suitable for me to get a more gradual contour that really sits well underneath my cheek bone.

I haven’t had mine for long, since it just released, but I haven’t had any issues with my other Wayne Goss brushes with respect to things one would determine with prolonged use, like abnormal shedding, ferrule loosening, and so forth. Based on past performance and the fact that this is limited edition, I am comfortable giving this review sooner rather than later!

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