Make Up For Ever #402 Artistic Fan Brush Review & Photos

Make Up For Ever #402 Artistic Fan Brush ($20.00) is described as a “pre-cut, fan brush with 8 sections used to create multi-line effects.” It’s part of the 400 series, which is the artistry/professional range. It is, quite possibly, the most unique brush I’ve come across. This is definitely not a brush that most people will be rushing out to grab, because it is specific and more of an artistry tool than anything else. Make Up For Ever says it can be used to create artistic patterns on the face and smaller areas of the bodies, and it is appropriate to use with creams and liquids. It’s 23mm wide, 15mm tall, and less than a 1mm thick. The ferrule clasps the bristles in the middle of the base, and then the brush fans out with eight distinct tips. The brush head is heavier than the handle, which is very long and skinny (total brush length is 6.5 inches/17 centimeters, and comes to a slanted point at the end. The bristles were soft when dragged across the skin and had a good amount of give and spring.

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Make Up For Ever #402 Artistic Fan Brush

Inglot 18SS, 27P, 32T Eye Brushes Reviews & Photos

Inglot 18SS Eye Brush ($21.00) is made out of “squirrel substitute” (I honestly have no idea what that means, but it is listed as a natural brush) and can be used for “eye modeling” and “smoky eye[s].” It’s a dense, dome-shaped brush that’s stiff. The brush head is 9mm tall, 8mm wide, and 8mm in depth. The brush head is like a like a cynlinder with a domed edge, and it’s not too small, not too big, but it is wider and larger than your typical pencil brush. I find that that’s the way I use it most–as a stiffer crease brush to deposit more color. I actually liked it a lot with cream eyeshadows, as it applied them well with good opacity, while still fitting in the crease. Most of the time, it is soft while used, but if I’m doing short, but firm, taps, then there’s a few bristles that feel slightly sharp.

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Inglot 27P Eye Brush

Inglot 16BJF Face Brush & 20T Synthetic Face Brush Review & Photos

Inglot 16BJF Face Brush ($36.00) is made out of goat hair and is recommended for bronzing powder (or “applying large amounts of intense color, ideal for contouring.” The brush measures approximately 7.5 inches (19 centimeters) long in total, with the handle length at 4.5 inches (11 centimeters), ferrule length at 2 inches (5.25 centimeters), and the brush head at 1 inch (2.5 centimeters). The brush head is 1.75 inches at its widest part (the top) and just under 1 inch at its base. It tapers upwards and flares out with a flat top. The brush is soft and dense, and it reminded me a bit of a buffer brush, just with a flatter top and a much longer handle. I like it for buffing and blending out other powder products, but I also liked it for applying loose setting powder. I’ve washed it half a dozen times, and I haven’t had any issues with dye bleeding, funny smells, or shedding. It does widen and spread out after the first wash, so it is not as narrow as it appears when you first get it.

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Inglot 16BJF Face Brush

Tom Ford Cream Foundation Brush (02) Review & Photos

Tom Ford Cream Foundation Brush (02) ($72.00) was created to be used with Tom Ford’s Traceless Foundation Stick, but it can easily be used with liquids as well as true creams. The brush is about 6″ long, while the brush head is about 1″ in height and width and is about a 1/2″ thick. It’s made with natural hair, though I haven’t been able to confirm exactly the type of natural hair (likely goat and potentially something else). The brush is made in Japan, and it’s rumored that Hakuhodo manufactures these, but I haven’t seen it confirmed or mentioned in a press release (only that Tom Ford engaged the world’s leading brush maker in Japan to make them to his exact specifications).  The handle is well-balanced, and the brush head is densely-packed and very, very soft. It’s not a small face brush, but it’s not a large one, so it can still maneuver underneath the eye and around the nose without issue.

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Tom Ford Cream Foundation (02) Brush
Tom Ford Beauty   Cream Foundation Brush (02)
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Sugarpill ElektroCute Neon Pigments

Sugarpill ElektroCute Neon Pigments ($16.00 for 0.19 oz.) come in an assortment of five bold, bright shades. Overall, these are going to be a product some will absolutely love and others will find frustrating and difficult to use (and ultimately not worth the patience). These are designed to be used with some sort of base or mixing medium and shouldn’t be applied straight to bare skin. Over the past week, I’ve tried a rich assortment of bases and mixing mediums, and I’ll lay out my findings below, but suffice to say, expect a fair amount of fall out, some trial and error, and maybe a test of your patience. On the plus side, when I wore these out, I was stopped by no less than five people asking me what I was wearing (in the space of an hour).

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Sugarpill Hellatronic ElektroCute Neon Pigment
Sugarpill   ElektroCute Neon Pigment
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7.5
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9
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7
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2.5
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MAC Illustrated Brush Kits Reviews & Photos

MAC Illustrated Brush Kits ($49.50) are available in two selections, one for just face, one for face and eyes. Both kits come with a brush roll, which holds five brushes with a clear plastic flap that protects the brush heads. The brush roll itself is made out of a vinyl-like material. If you recently purchased any of the Illustrated bags, it’s made out of the same material as that. Smooth, slick plastic that’s not quite as shiny as vinyl. The brush roll has a 3/4″ wide black strap that ties the roll together. Each brush has a shiny black handle with a matte black ferrule.

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MAC Illustrated Brush Kit