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simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro Review & Photos

01/13

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro

Rose Gold

simplehuman Rose Gold Sensor Mirror Pro ($250.00) is the latest and greatest in the brand’s mirror family. I’m so, so pleased with what they’ve done to improve in the latest model, because I feel like they addressed the major issue I had with the original as well as a disappointment in a lack of features–and for the price point, I wanted to love it through and through.  It’s a large, 5x magnifying mirror that comes with a smaller, magnetic 10x mirror with a ring of light along the outer edge of the larger, 5x magnifying mirror.  It’s available in stainless steel as well as a new, rose gold hue (which I’d say is not quite as coppery or as warm-toned as most rose gold jewelry).

You can read my original review here. The quality of the mirror and the light from simplehuman’s mirrors is excellent, and it lasts a long time on a single charge, so it really can be wireless most of the time. The biggest issue I had with the mirror was that there was no way to have steady on or increase the sensor timer, so it would shut off too quickly–like if I got up to find an item, it would shut off. I also felt like the price point dictated more features, like dimming, greater magnification, and so forth. I, also, apparently mentioned the lack of side panels, at the time of my original review, which was answered with the Pro Wide.

The newest Pro mirrors use a mobile app to increase the control you have over the type of light, brightness, length of time the light will stay on, add an alarm or timer, as well as capture light from a setting and recreate it on your mirror. The mirror is also compatible with things like the Nest Cam, Alexa, and IFTTT. I like that the app is straightforward and easy to use; I feel like anyone can use it–the app has a lightweight, streamlined feel to it that is intuitive. You can choose from:

  • Light Modes:  Sunlight, Overcast, Restaurant, Candlelit, Office, as well as create custom scenes
    • You can also increase and decrease the brightness or have it set to auto-brightness
  • Alarm & Timer:  you can set an alarm or control how long it is on (5 to 30 minutes)
  • Sensor Settings:  choose from 5, 10, 30 seconds, 1, 5, or 10 minutes for how long until the sensor will turn off (if it does not detect motion)
simplehuman Sensor Mirror Pro Rose Gold
Rose Gold
Rose Gold
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
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Hakuhodo B5521, G5545, B505 Face Brushes Reviews & Photos

Hakuhodo Brushes
Hakuhodo Brushes

Hakuhodo B5521BkSL Highlight Brush Tapered ($53.00) is a small-to-medium sized brush that flares out from the base and tapers to a rounded point. It is made with a mix of blue squirrel and goat hair. The brush head measured 18.00mm in width, 32.00mm in length, and 18.00mm in thickness, and the brush had a total length of 6.77 inches / 17.20 centimeters.

The shape is comparable to many highlighter brushes available, which isn’t a bad thing, as it is versatile and is a shape many may be familiar with. It does mean that there are other options available at lower price points, including in Hakuhodo’s J-series, where it is made solely of goat hair, for $38, for those who do not need the extra silkiness that blue squirrel offers. I like blue squirrel or the mix in this brush for more shimmery and frosted highlighters, as it builds them more gradually and seems to diffuse the shimmer more evenly (just by a bit). The tapered shape enabled the brush to sweep gently across the cheek bones to lay down highlighter more precisely, and the rounded tip applied highlighter nicely down the nose and on the cupid’s bow.

Hakuhodo G5545BkSL Blush Brush Round & Flat ($63.00) is a medium-sized blush brush that is flatter in shape, so it is not as round and full, with a tapering, rounded edge. It is made with a mix of blue squirrel and goat hair. The brush head measured 33.90mm in width, 38.00mm in length, and 18.7mm in thickness, and the brush had a total length of 6.85 inches / 17.40 centimeters.

The brush seemed light-to-moderate in density, so I had some flexibility and give near the edge of the brush, but it didn’t flop around or splay too readily if I used greater pressure with it against my face. The flatter shape seemed to work best for someone who likes more sweeping motions and light circular motions, but it will not buff out color as well as a more rounded brush shape or a fuller brush head overall. The bristles felt incredibly smooth and silky against the face, and I didn’t feel any of the individual bristles despite heavy pressure and trying a variety of directions and motions. It is a bit larger than your typical highlighting brush, but I liked it for subtle to moderate highlighters as well as blush and bronzer (which is what it is designed for). The brush worked well for applying initial color and blending and diffusing the edges of the color. This brush does not seem to have a goat-hair only version in Hakuhodo’s range.

Hakuhodo B505BkSL Blush Brush Round & Flat ($98.00) is a medium-to-large blush brush that is full, thick, and fairly dense with a rounded edge and tapering bristles. It is made out of blue squirrel and goat hairs. The brush head measured 34.20mm in width, 38.25mm in length, and 22.80mm in thickness, and the brush had a total length of 7.00 inches / 17.80 centimeters.

The fullness and greater density of this brush means it packs on a lot more pigment from the get-go, but it also can blend edges more readily. While it is a flatter blush brush, it is thicker and much denser compared to the G5545 (to me, it seems double the thickness, but it’s only ~5mm thicker). I can easily do sweeping and circular motions with it, so I can buff edges or diffuse color outward. The brush is, unsurprisingly, silky and smooth with nary a loose bristle or unpleasant sharpness regardless of the amount of pressure or the direction it was used in. I like it more for sheerer formulas or more powdery ones where the denser, larger surface area means I can get an even amount of color on the brush without a lot of product getting caught in the interior of the brush. It also works well when you want to apply color to a larger part of the face, like bronzer along the forehead and the like. This brush is also available in the J-series as a mix of goat and synthetic bristles for $72.

Hakuhodo   B5521BkSL Highlight Brush Tapered
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Hakuhodo   G5545BkSL Blush Brush Round & Flat
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Hakuhodo   B505BkSL Blush Brush Round & Flat
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

See more photos & swatches!

Hakuhodo G511, B512, B116, S116 Face Brushes Reviews & Photos

Hakuhodo Brushes:  B5521, G511, B512, G5545, B505
Hakuhodo Brushes: B5521, G511, B512, G5545, B505

G511 Highlighter Brush Angled

Hakuhodo G511 Highlighter Brush Angled ($44.00) is a small, angled face brush that’s lightly fluffy, moderately dense, and thick enough to blend and apply color, and it was designed to be used with highlighters. It is shaped a lot like the traditional contour powder product, but this is smaller than average. It is 29.10mm in length, 21.75mm in width, and 13.90mm in thickness with a total handle length of inches / centimeters. It is made out of blue squirrel and goat hair, and I’m a huge fan of mixing the two types of hair, because you get a lot of the softness of blue squirrel with a little more durability and blendability of goat hair. It is, of course, incredibly soft, silky, and smooth, and I could never feel any individual hairs against my skin.

I’ve always liked the more angled brush head for really good sweeping motions and applications, as it really helps to diffuse the color across the skin. I think that’s why it is great for applying a soft, gradual, and luminous highlight. The softness of the blue squirrel helps apply more pigmented products in a more gradual way, though the smaller size can give one more precision as well. I particularly like using this size when I’m layering highlighter on top of blush or bronzer.

It’s large enough that it can still be used to contour cheeks and the jaw line with ease, but it is too large to contour the nose with any sense of precision. It will enable you to get a more precise contour under the cheek bone, but the smaller size works well for subtle, more diffused blending that doesn’t blur the contour product too much. If you tend to be more heavy handed with products, though, you might prefer something with less density and a slightly larger size. It worked well with all sorts of color products–blush, bronzer, contour, highlighter, setting powder–and is versatile.

B512BkSL Highlight Brush Angled

Hakuhodo B512BkSL Highlight Brush Angled ($65.00) is a medium-to-large sized angled face brush with moderate density, a little fluffiness as the bristles taper toward the edge. The brand says that it is supposed to be used to apply makeup around the eye and to use it with light strokes. It is 35.00mm in length, 35.40mm in width, and 22.30mm in thickness with a total length of inches / centimeters. It is a mix of goat and blue squirrel hair, which gives it the silkiness of blue squirrel with more durability and resilience of goat hair. I noticed that this one had several bristles that splayed from the edges after washing, which is a rarer issue with my Hakuhodo brushes, so you might find a brush shaper necessary with this one.

This brush works well when you want to apply sheerer coverage over a larger area or for blending out products after they’ve been applied. The larger shape is harder to work with when you have a very pigmented highlighter, blush, or bronzer, as it tends to over-apply color. Similarly, it’s too large to contour the hollows of my cheeks and will likely be too large for most (it is noticeably larger than the average-sized contour angled brush), but it will work well for blending and diffusing a contour in sweeping and light buffing motions where product has already been applied. In some ways, you might think of it as an angled buffing brush, as it blends out powders exceptionally well.

B116BkSL Highlight Brush Round & Flat

Hakuhodo B116BkSL Highlight Brush Round & Flat ($59.00) is a small, flat brush with a rounded edge that comes to a very gentle point that is designed for highlighting and achieving sheerer coverage. This brush uses blue squirrel hair, which makes it incredibly soft and airy on the skin. It is 28.50mm in length, 20.48mm in width, and 9.25mm in thickness with a total handle length of inches / centimeters.

The shape works well for patting and lightly sweeping illuminating powders on the high planes of the face, like cheek bones, as well as for applying powder underneath the eye. The softness of the blue squirrel makes it so the bristles do not disturb the under eye area, which gives a better finish and minimizes the chance for the area to look dry, over-powdered, or crepe-y. It can also be used to apply blush at sheer to medium coverage (as desired), blending out edges of various cheek color products, and so forth, but as it is a smaller brush, it may lay down too much color in one spot with more pigmented products or may feel like it takes too long to apply if the area is larger.

S116Bk Highlight Brush Round & Flat

Hakuhodo S116Bk Highlight Brush Round & Flat ($67.00) is a small, flat brush with a rounded edge that comes to a very gentle point and is meant for highlighting. It is exactly the same as the B116BkSL and the J116 ($35.00). I meant to get the S113 but inadvertently managed to get the same brush twice, the only difference between the B116BkSL and the S116Bk is a gold ferrule (24-karat gold plated brass vs. nickel brass/silver). It’s a lovely brush, and lucky enough, it is versatile for me. The J116 uses goat hair instead of blue squirrel, so the J116 is more resilient and durable and has white bristles.

Choosing the Type of Hair for Your Brushes

I often get asked what type of hair is best for what. There are a lot of preferences to take into account, but here is a quick primer on common hair types:

Synthetic is best for cream and liquid products, as it doesn’t absorb them and is very easy to clean without worrying about damaging natural fibers. I often find synthetics can kick up excessive powder in the pan and do not catch the powder as well in the fibers, so the application can be heavy and/or uneven. Most synthetics are pretty soft, but they can have sharp edges if not made well.

Horse and pony are more resilient and durable, so they require less care and can be washed regularly. The softness can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer but can be softer than you might expect.

Goat is the most common type of natural hair used, and it is usually white, though it can be dyed and is often dyed black when it is. There are different types of goat hair (based on where the hair was taken from), so softness can range from incredibly silky to mildly scratchy. In general, most of the Japanese brush brands I’ve used have very soft goat hair brushes, but the goat hair I find in more mainstream brands (like MAC) is noticeably less soft/silky. Goat offers good durability, moderate give and flex, and works particularly nicely with powders but can be used with liquids and creams as well. It can be washed more often and requires less babying over time.

Squirrel is very soft and silky, and it is often a little airier on the skin with more give. This type is better for sheerer applications of powder products (and manufacturers warn against using this hair with liquids and creams) or very, very sensitive skin that can’t handle the texture of even the softest goat hair. You are really not supposed to wash it more than a few times a year. (I do not adhere to that, and I accept that my brushes may need to be replaced in 10 years instead of in my next lifetime. I am okay with the cost of that decision, if it proves true!)

If you’re looking to try natural hair brushes, I would start with a quality goat hair brush to see how you like the texture and feel against the skin. Squirrel is undoubtedly soft and silky against the skin, but it is costly, higher maintenance, and is less versatile compared to goat hair. Synthetics are also a good option for more affordable brushes, particularly if you’re just getting to know your application style, size and shape preferences, and so forth.

Hakuhodo is my go-to for natural brushes, as they have a large variety of shapes and styles, but they also make shapes in different materials, so you have more choice in terms of hair type and price point–some of their natural hair eye brushes are much more affordable than you might expect but most medium and large face/cheek brushes will be pricey. If you need the comfort of a good return policy, opt for Wayne Goss or Chikuhodo, which can be purchased via Beautylish.

Hakuhodo   G511 Highlighter Brush Angled
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Hakuhodo   B512BkSL Highlight Brush Angled
A-

14
Product
13
Fitness
4.5
Durability
4.5
Construction
90%
Total
Hakuhodo   B116BkSL Highlight Brush Round & Flat
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total
Hakuhodo   S116Bk Highlight Brush Round & Flat
A+

15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Holiday 2016 Sakura Brush Set Review, Photos, Comparisons

Chikuhodo x Beautylish Holiday 2016 Sakura Brush Set
Chikuhodo x Beautylish Holiday 2016 Sakura Brush Set

Chikuhodo Sakura Set (Beautylish) ($245.00) includes six brushes that come in a brush roll with a zippered pocket and several slots for brushes that ties together for traveling. They have shorter handles than some might be used to, though they are in line with most Japanese branded brushes (and are consistent with Chikuhodo’s Z-series). The brushes feature a metallic red ferrule and a glossy red handle with cherry blossoms.

The brushes are good quality, and I had no issues with using them thus far. I can’t comment on how the brushes will hold up over time, so the durability ratings you’ll find on these brushes are based on initial washings (I washed each brush six times) as well as my experience with Chikuhodo’s brushes in general (including durability of last year’s Sakura set, which is fully intact and I still use some brushes from that set). I do, however, like Chikuhodo’s brushes a lot, though I tend to lean toward the Z series for brushes I personally use and reach for (but I have some favorites from the GSN range, and I am not well-versed in the Passions series).

I like the set, but I’m not keen on the inclusion of the brow and lip brush–I feel like they are a way to increase the number of brushes but without adding a lot of cost, and these are both brushes that can be easily replaced with a number of other brushes at lower price points. The brow brush is also substantially thicker than the majority of brow brushes on the market, making it less than ideal for doing detail work, creating individual “hairs,” or brushing product through the tail of the brow (depends on how thick the tail of your brow is, of course). The lip brush is functional, but it is synthetic, and there are many quality synthetics available at lower price points.

Thoughts on Value

In assessing value, I think it’s obviously there relative to purchasing comparable brushes individually, but as with all sets, value is truly subjective, because if you would only use two of the brushes, you are better off getting individual brushes that really fit your needs. I find that the softness and feel of the bristles (particularly of the goat hair) are most comparable to Chikuhodo’s Takumi series, where the T-1 Powder Brush is made out of Saikoho goat and retails for $125; T-5 Highlight is made out of Saikoho goat hair and retails for $52; T-3 Foundation is made out of Saikoho goat hair and retails for $65 — and these align the closest to the face brushes in the set. I’d say that Chikuhodo’s GSN-10 is closer to the Blending Brush included in the set but not quite the same in size, but it is made out of goat hair and retails for $21. Chikuhodo’s lip brushes run around $30 (both the Passion and Z series), while the Passion PS-5 Eyebrow brush is also made out of badger hair and retails for $22.

If you bought these individually, they would run you $315. That being said, the Takumi T-1 Powder Brush is much, much larger and fuller (it’s a huge brush), and I think that a fairer assessment of value would be closer to $70-85 for the Powder Brush included in the Sakura set as a result. The T-5 Highlight is fuller as well (19mm vs. 16.5mm) but not as significantly different than the powder brushes, so I think it would be similarly priced. There’s a little value to getting them together, but I don’t think it’s enough if you won’t love all of them.

If you are more inclined to purchase your brushes individually, these are the ones I would recommend in lieu of the Sakura set but having similar shapes and functionality for the four goat hair brushes in the set. Please note, I might reach for other brushes not listed below due to personally preferring slightly different shapes or styles (that aren’t similar enough to the ones in the set). All of the brushes listed below are high-quality brushes that I’ve tried and tested over long periods of time. I tried to include synthetic options as well, for those who prefer synthetics.

* Indicates the brush I personally reach for MOST often for this function. ** Indicates the brush I personally reach for the second most often for this function.

Alternatives: Medium-to-Large Powder Brushes

Alternatives: Flatter, Tapered Cheek Brushes

  • SUQQU Cheek Brush ($97.00), small-to-medium brush with low density, feathery feel, best for applying, sweeping, and blending, works well with blush and highlighters, squirrel hair (review) *
  • Chikuhodo Z-Series Z-2 Highlight ($78.00), small-to-large, tapered brush that’s more rounded in the body but comes to a tapered edge, moderate density, gray squirrel hair (review) **
  • Chikuhodo Takumi T-5 Highlight ($52.00), a small-to-medium brush with a tapered edge, saikoho goat hair, ideal for more specific placement, moderate blending
  • Hakuhodo G5545 Blush Brush ($63.00), medium blush brush with a flared, rounded edge with only a slight taper, flatter, best for sheer to moderate pigmented powder products for application, good for blending in sweeping and patting motions, blue squirrel/goat hair mix **
  • Real Techniques Blush Brush ($8.99), a medium-to-large, tapered blush brush, rather full and rounded in the body, synthetic (I have not found a lot of go-to cheek brushes that are synthetic, but this is the best thus far and I’d give it a soft recommendation)
  • Real Techniques Setting Brush ($7.99), a small, rounded and lightly tapered brush ideal for highlighting, under-eye setting, and soft blush application, synthetic

Alternatives: Dense, Rounded Foundation Brushes

Alternatives: Small-to-Medium, Tapered Crease Brushes

  • Hakuhodo J142 ($19.00), a small-to-medium sized crease brush with a tapered edge, moderate fullness in the body, goat hair (review) *
  • Tom Ford Eyeshadow Blend (13) ($56.00), a small-to-medium sized crease brush with a tapered, lightly rounded edge, moderate fullness, goat hair (review)
  • Wayne Goss Brush 19 ($27.00), a small-to-medium sized crease brush with a tapered edge, moderate fullness in the body, goat hair (review) **
  • OCC Tapered Blending Brush ($22.00), a small-to-medium sized, rounded, lightly tapered brush, synthetic

The Powder Brush

The Powder Brush (Sakura 2016) is designed for use with loose powders and is made out of Saikoho goat hair. It’s a medium-to-large powder brush with a domed, tapered edge that is a little longer but didn’t feel floppy or like it had too much give. The brush head was mm in 36.00width, 51.50mm in length, and 22.00mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 7.09 inches / 18.00 centimeters.

The brush works well for patting, sweeping, and blending out powders on the face, particularly loose and pressed setting and finishing powders. It had moderate-to-full density, so it held its shape well and was easy to work with on the face. I liked how it was large but did not feel oversized to me, so I think it is a good size for most faces for powder application. The brush feels incredibly soft and smooth against my skin, and it is definitely softer than last year’s Sakura powder brush.

The Cheek Brush

The Cheek Brush (Sakura 2016) is supposed to be used with powder and cream blushes, bronzers, and highlighters. It is made out of Saikoho goat hair. The brush was small-to-medium in size; not the smallest but a little shy of typical medium from what I’ve seen. The shape of the brush flares out slightly from the base and then flares back in to a rounded, tapered edge with graduation of length down the front and back of the brush, which helps with blending and diffusing color across the skin. The brush head was 26.4mm in width, 39.00mm in length, and 16.5mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 6.57 inches / 16.70 centimeters.

I found it useful for applying blush, highlighter, and bronzer on the face, but I liked it best for powders as I find denser brushes better for cream applications (you need that extra density to get the product onto of the pan, in my experience). The brush itself is soft, smooth, and silky against the skin, and I never felt individual bristles using it, regardless of direction. It is best for blush, as the size is most suitable for that, but it can be used to apply highlighter if you keep the product concentrated on the edge and then sweep it on. The brush will work best for someone who likes to sweep and pull their powders on the face, rather than buff in circular motions.

The Foundation Brush

The Foundation Brush (Sakura 2016) was created to be used with liquid and cream foundations, as well as cream contour products, and it is made out of Saikoho goat hair. It is a smaller foundation brush with a wider shape that has a rounded edge and has some depth that gives it a flat, working surface along the edge. The brush head was 26.00mm in width, 24.50mm in length, and 19.00mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 6.06 inches / 15.40 centimeters.

Of the four natural hair brushes in the set, this is the only one where I could sometimes feel the edges (a bit of sharpness) of some bristles when I used a moderate hand with a stippling or tapping motion. If I was only lightly stippling, it felt soft and smooth against the skin, as it did when swept, buffed, and pulled. Personally, it’s smaller than I like for foundation, as it takes longer with this brush, but if you have a smaller face, it will be a nice option for you. It soaks up more watery foundations more than I like, so I’d consider using fingertips to spread the foundation out initially and then using this brush to blend; or you can lightly spray the bristles with water (which gives it something to absorb first) and then work the foundation across the face. It is a bit harder to clean, as it is a denser brush, but the small size means it dries faster than most foundation brushes.

The Blending Brush

The Blending Brush is supposed to be used for applying and blending color in the crease and is made out of Sokoho goat hair. It’s a medium-sized crease brush that flares out from the base to a fuller mid-width and then tapers to a soft pointed edge. It had light-to-moderate density, enough that it can still deposit color with some precision but still fluffy that it can blend and diffuse color in sweeping and buffing motions. It’s a solid crease brush, but it’s one of the more popular sizes/styles, so it is also more readily duped by individual brushes. I noticed it tended to fluff up with half a dozen bristles that splayed out, so this is one you might want to use a brush guard or wrap for to help it retain its shape better.

The brush head was mm in 9.00width, 19.00mm in length, and 9.00mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 5.82 inches / 14.80 centimeters.

The Lip Brush

The Lip Brush (Sakura 2016) is designed for giving crisp edges and full coverage, and it can be used with concealer, too. This brush is made out of synthetic fibers. It’s a rectangular, flat synthetic brush that comes to a very flat, crisp edge. The brush head was 5.50mm in width, 11.50mm in length, and 2.30mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 5.55 inches / 14.10 centimeters.

I liked it best when I used downward, pulling motions on the lips for filling in my lips with color completely. When I used it more for lining and stayed primarily on the edge, I noticed some of the bristles separated from the majority of the bristles, which gave me a little less precision than I’d like. It’s also stiffer that it did not maneuver around the cupid’s bow with as much fluidity as I have experienced with other lip brushes.

The Brow Brush

The Brow Brush (Sakura 2016) is supposed to be used for depositing and blending powder or pomade brow products and is made out of water badger hair. It’s a small, angled brow brush that’s noticeable thicker and almost “fluffed” in appearance compared to the majority of angled brow brushes I’ve tried. The brush head was 5.52mm in width, 6.20mm in length, and 2.60mm in thickness, while the brush had a total length of 5.43 inches / 13.80 centimeters.

That thickness actually makes it much less suitable for working on brows for initially applying color (powder or cream), filling them in, or creating “hairs” with fine lines. I just didn’t think it worked well for depositing color, so applying color or filling in my brows with this brush often resulted in over-application of product, but I did like how it blended color after I had applied it with another brush. The thicker quality of the brush gave it the give and flexibility needed to diffuse and blend brow color without disturbing it too much, and the small size of it made it appropriate for blending within the brow’s natural shape without it being too easy to go outside the shape. I do, however, find a spoolie brush more effective and faster to use for that purpose.

Chikuhodo Holiday 2016 Sakura Set (Beautylish)
A-

Limited Edition

13
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
4.5
Construction
90%
Total
See All Glossovers

Also In This Review

IT Cosmetics Velvet Luxe Brushes (304, 307, 314, 320, 322) Reviews & Photos

IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush
IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush

No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush ($38.00) is designed as a “flat but wide” brush for cream and liquid foundation application. It’s a medium-sized, dense, dome-shaped foundation brush made out of synthetic fibers. The brush head measured 33.5mm in width, 32.0mm in length, and 17.4mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.2 inches / 18.3 centimeters. IT’s Velvet Luxe range uses incredibly soft synthetic hairs that are as soft as high-end goat hair used by brands like Chikuhodo, Hakuhodo, etc. I liked this best with liquid, medium coverage or greater foundations with satin to luminous finishes, and it will fit in best with someone who tends to apply their foundation in patting and smooth downward (or upward) strokes rather than in circular, buffing motions.
The curved edge fits in well when maneuvering around the nose, underneath the eye, and around the mouth. Personally, I still preferred the No. 302 for liquid foundation.

The brush felt soft in all directions, and it felt like it was moving across the skin as a single entity, so I did not feel the individual bristles when I was using it. It is fairly dense, though the last fourth of the brush, toward the edge, is more tapered and is less dense compared to the base of the brush head, which allows for better diffusing and spreading of liquid/cream products across the skin. It left a streak-free finish behind, so long as it was cleaned every other application; otherwise, the bristles would stick together and start to leave visible streaks behind (true with most brushes, though, when used with heavier liquids and creams!). I had no issues cleaning the brush, and it dried in a reasonable length of time (within half a day). The brush can also work for applying liquid and cream blush/bronzer if you have a larger surface area, but I’d recommend using a bit less than you think you’ll need, as the greater density means it can apply heavier coverage more quickly.

No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush ($48.00) is supposed to be used for all-over powder application. It’s a synthetic, large powder brush that flares out moderately from the base and has a rounded edge that flattens out to a more buffing brush-like edge. It’s like a powder and buffer brush married together, as it is very dense–denser than most of the powder brushes I have. The brush head measured 47.6mm in width, 40.0mm in length, and 47.6mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.7 inches / 19.5 centimeters. For applying something like setting powder all-over, it had a tendency to over-apply, as it was so dense. It also worked well for applying pressed powder foundations if medium or greater coverage was desired.

This is one of my favorite IT brushes I’ve tried, but I tend to use it primarily for buffing powder into the skin, so I might use it when I’m doing a heavier layer of setting powder (often when I’ve used a dewier base), to apply finishing powder all-over, or to lightly buff everything together at the end (with no product on it). As much as I love the feel of buffer brushes, I love when I find long-handled brushes that work similarly as I prefer the longer handle. It is almost impossibly soft; it is as soft as blue squirrel hair brushes (which are the softest that I’ve felt). When the brush skims across the face, it feels like fluid movement; none of the individual bristles are felt against the skin, and I could use it in any direction or motion. The brush isn’t as balanced as others in the line, as there is a bit more weight sitting in the ferrule and brush head, but the curvature of the handle (designed to be ergonomic, and there’s a natural tendency to hold the line like a writing instrument) seems to combat some of the downward pull from the extra weight on one end.

Due to the density and general size, it can be harder to clean and take longer than average to dry. If I just use it with powders and wash it at least once a week, it’s the same effort and energy to clean as other powder brushes, but if I let it sit too long or it gets liquid/cream product on it, I find it takes longer to rinse all of the product and soap out. It’s usually dry the next day for me, but it definitely takes a few hours longer than most.

No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush ($28.00) is for liquid and cream concealer application that is “soft” and “subtle” using “sweeping motions.” It’s a synthetic, medium-to-large-sized flat concealer brush with a slightly domed edge. The brush head measured 10.5mm in width, 15.8mm in length, and 4.8mm in thickness with a handle length of 6.9 inches / 17.2 centimeters. It’s thin without being razor sharp, but it the edge doesn’t taper enough to give really diffused, blended results. I usually had some visible brush strokes, and the size made it best for under eye concealer and larger surface areas (not so great for redness around the nose, spot correcting, etc.). It’s disappointing for blending out concealer; it was best at just patting and spreading a liquid or cream concealer around an area, but I needed to go back in with a fingertip or another tool to diffuse and blend out the edges and hide brush strokes.

While the bristles felt soft, the edges of the brush felt “stabby” against the skin at times, though not consistently. It was the first time I’ve ever felt individual bristles from one of the Velvet Luxe brushes! It is a denser brush, and it is thicker than the average flat, concealer brush, which made it harder to cleanse liquid/cream concealer out of, as they tended to be fuller coverage products. I highly recommend cleaning after each use, as it just gunked up unforgivably if left sitting for a day. It did not seem to take much longer to dry than most synthetic eye brushes (half a day or less). Alternatively, I tried using it with cream eyeshadow, and it did work for that, though there are other brushes I preferedr for cream eyeshadow.

No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush ($26.00) is designed for blending eyeshadow in the crease “using windshield wiper motions.” It’s like an elongated stubby crease brush that came to a rather flat edge–there’s a very, very slight curve but was hard to see in person. It is made out of synthetic fibers. The brush head measured 7.8mm in width, 12.1mm in length, and 7.8mm in thickness with a handle length of 6.8 inches / 17.2 centimeters. I found it most useful for applying rich color into the deepest part of the crease without over-blending or instantly diffusing the color, and secondarily, it was able to blend out color, but it wasn’t as good at blending as it was for depositing and laying down color into the crease (and blending is what it is supposed to be for!). The brush was silky and smooth regardless of direction or application method.

The shape reminded me of a blunter smudging or pencil brush, and it a longer length as well, which gave it some ability to blend out color, as it moved back and forth. As the shape is similar to a pencil brush, it also worked well for applying color underneath the lash line or to blow out the lower lash line with a powder eyeshadow. The synthetic fibers made this workable with cream products into the crease, and that’s a tough job for a lot of brushes; the density and shape of the brush really shined for depositing richer coverage with a cream eyeshadow into the crease. It had just enough give to diffuse the edge of a cream eyeshadow past the crease. When it came to powder products, it carved out the crease well with obvious laydown of color, but I often wanted to go in with a more feathery, fluffier brush for diffusing and blending the crease color upward. I’ve had no issues cleaning the brush, and it dried within a normal length of time.

No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush

IT Cosmetics No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush ($26.00) is touted as an eye brush for sweeping eyeshadow all over the lid. It’s a large, synthetic eyeshadow brush that’s fairly flat and has a fluffier, tapered, dome-shaped edge. The brush head measured 11.0mm in width, 15.8mm in length, and 6.6mm in thickness with a handle length of 7.0 inches / 17.7 centimeters. It worked well for applying eyeshadow all over the lid–exactly as described–and is best for someone who wants an all-over wash of color on the lid. I also liked it for diffusing the edges of cream eyeshadow as well as for blending out under eye concealer (better than the No. 314!).

The brush was soft to the touch, and I never encountered a direction or technique where I could feel individual bristles or any roughness. It’s moderately dense, so it can pack on a decent amount of product by patting it onto the lid. The domed, tapered edge worked well for diffusing eyeshadow into the crease, and it could also be used to blend out the crease area or apply product to the brow bone. If you’re looking for something to pack on two or more colors onto the lid, I would look for something smaller, but for a wash of color or packing on medium to full coverage eyeshadow onto the lid, this worked well. It cleaned easily and dried in a normal length of time.

IT Cosmetics   No. 304 Velvet Luxe Plush Foundation Brush
14
Product
14
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
95%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 307 Velvet Luxe LBD Powder Brush
13
Product
11
Fitness
5
Durability
4.5
Construction
84%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 314 Velvet Luxe Smooth Concealer Brush
11
Product
9
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
73%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 320 Velvet Luxe Effortless Crease Brush
11
Product
11
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
80%
Total
IT Cosmetics   No. 322 Velvet Luxe Plush All-Over Shadow Brush
15
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
5
Construction
100%
Total

See more photos & swatches!

Kat Von D Lock-It Concealer, Foundation, Precision Powder, Setting Powder Brushes Reviews & Photos

Kat Von D Lock-It Concealer Brush
Kat Von D Edge Lock-It Concealer Brush

Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush ($24.00) is supposed to blend out under eye concealer and help apply concealer onto blemishes. It is a medium-sized under eye/concealer brush that is dense and thicker than the average brush, and it has a triangular taper on the wider edge, which is what enables it to fit well underneath the eye and along the edge of the nose (by the eye area). The edge is a few millimeters in width, and this is the best aspect of the brush, I think, as it manages blending and diffusing of the under eye concealer up to the lash line without streaking over any eyeliner, as you can get a very soft, gradual edge that meets the eyeliner instead (for those who apply their eye makeup first).

The brush head is 14.50mm in width, 15.00mm in length, and 8.50 mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.00 inches / 18.00 centimeters. It is made out of synthetic bristles and has a glossy black, acrylic handle with a thick ferrule that tapers to a fine point at the end and carries more weight toward the brush head. I find the composition of the Lock-It brushes to have an uneven weight distribution, but it is only noticeable during application with the larger brushes and less so with this one. The greater density makes it harder to clean than some brushes, but it doesn’t take much time nor does it take an extraordinarily long time to dry. The bristles are silky, smooth, and never feel rough or harsh in any direction. It worked well for evenly distributing and spreading out under eye concealer (both liquids and creams) without causing the concealer to become streaky, but it did seem to soak up a fair amount of product and would need to be cleaned each use, if used as an applicator as well as blending tool. I tended to favor it more for blending out concealer, which I tend to dab and spread with whatever brush I’ve used for liquid foundation, to get the concealer closer to the lash line and diffuse it softly along the edges so there are no obvious lines.

Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush ($34.00) is meant for applying and blending liquid and cream foundations while getting into the contours of the face. It’s a medium-large-sized liquid foundation brush that is rectangular in overall shape with edges that flare outwards from the ferrule. What makes it a more interesting brush shape is that the wider side of the brush comes out and then has a triangular wedge or dent that goes in and gives it a more pyramid-like shape. It is similar to the Concealer brush, but the indentation and shape are more noticeable and distinct in the foundation brush.

The brush head is 35.00mm in width, 26.00mm in length, and 21.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.50 inches / 19.00 centimeters. The brush uses synthetic fibers and a glossy black, acrylic handle that has significant weighting toward the ferrule and brush head, so it feels top-heavy in my hand compared to the average brush (this is one of the few things I wasn’t keen on). It is a dense brush, which I tended to double-cleanse to bring it back the white bristles, but the drying time seemed average. The fibers felt soft, smooth, and silky against the skin, and it could be used in all directions, but it is a brush that is best suited for those who apply their foundation in downward, outward, or upward strokes, rather than in circular or buffing motions. It does a good job of spreading foundation and evening out liquid and cream formulas.

Lock-It Precision Powder Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Precision Powder Brush ($32.00) is supposed to work for setting under eye concealer. It’s a medium-sized, flatter, dome-shaped brush with a light-medium density and even shape. It looks more like a blush brush than a brush one might think to use around the eyes, but it is actually quite good at applying and patting under eye concealer into place without disturbing the concealer much. It seemed slightly too dense for really sweeping and diffusing loose powder underneath the eye, so I had to be more careful with how much powder was on my brush.

The brush head is 2500mm in width, 35.00mm in length, and 14.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 7.85 inches / 20.00 centimeters. It is made out of synthetic fibers and paired with a glossy black, acrylic handle that is thicker at the ferrule and tapers to a much finer point. The balance is off, as quite a bit of weight is shifted toward the ferrule and brush head, which is less comfortable in the hand. I also tried using this with powder blushes and highlighters, and it picked up product decently but didn’t apply as well as true blush brushes (color and shimmer were somewhat uneven when I used this).

(Am I the only one who thinks “Precision Setting” would have been a better name for this? The name and shape instantly said “Blush!” to me.)

Lock-It Setting Powder Brush

Kat Von D Lock-It Setting Powder Brush ($38.00) is designed for use with loose powder to give a “soft, diffused veil of powder.” It is a large powder brush with a more spherical shape–it flares out from the ferrule but then tapers to a more rounded point. Where the black bristles become white, there’s a floppiness from there that is a bit heavy on the face and results in a lot less control. I think the brush shape is far too tapered for buffing, so it only worked for lightly sweeping, but the rounded shape resulted in less surface area and a longer application time. It’s more like a Goldilocks of a brush; not fluffy enough for really diffused, all-over setting powder application but not dense enough for patting powder into place for better setting power, while being too tapered for buffing but too round for patting. I liked it for lightly dusting a finishing powder or a subtle highlighter along the high planes of the face (but it does not work with really intense highlighters, as it is too dense, for subtle, all-over glow).

The brush head is 30.00mm in width, 49.00mm in length, and 30.00mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 8.50 inches / 21.50 centimeters. It is made using synthetic fibers with a glossy black, acrylic handle with its thickest point around the ferrule and comes to a much narrower tapered point at the end. The weight distribution is noticeably in the ferrule and brush head, which makes it less balanced in the hand. The brush felt soft, silky, and smooth against the skin and never felt scratchy, no matter the direction or technique I used with it.

Kat Von D   Lock-It Edge Concealer Brush
13
Product
13.5
Fitness
5
Durability
4.5
Construction
90%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Edge Foundation Brush
14
Product
15
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
95%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Precision Powder Brush
13
Product
13
Fitness
5
Durability
4
Construction
88%
Total
Kat Von D   Lock-It Setting Powder Brush
12
Product
12
Fitness
5
Durability
3.5
Construction
81%
Total

See more photos & swatches!

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