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Chanel Impulsive (132) & Enigmatique (135) Rouge Allure Lip Color

Chanel Impulsive (132) Rouge Allure Lip Color
Chanel Impulsive (132) Rouge Allure Lip Color

Chanel Impulsive (132) Rouge Allure Lip Color ($34.00 for 0.12 oz.) is a warm, coral-red with a frosted, slightly matte, finish. It had rich, opaque color coverage, but the texture made lips look wrinkly and dry (and I swear, they weren’t at all!). It wore well for nearly six hours, but it was slightly drying. MAC Night to Remember (LE, $15.00) is darker, redder. Guerlain Madame Flirte (861) (LE, $49.50) is pinker. MAC Rozz (LE, $15.00) is brighter, redder. Chanel Dialogue (P, $34.00) is less frosted but similar in color. Revlon Wild Watermelon (P, $7.49) is pinker. Chanel Amant (P, $34.00) is similar but less frosted. Tom Ford Beauty Willful (P, $48.00) is less frosted, warmer. Guerlain Rouge Sensuel (LE, $49.50) is similar but less frosted. Chanel Flamboyante (P, $34.00) is lighter. See comparison swatches.

Enigmatique (135) Rouge Allure Lip Color ($34.00 for 0.12 oz.) is a warm, slightly muted, red with a soft, frosted finish that almost looks like a matte frost. It had mostly opaque color coverage, and though the lipstick itself glided onto lips easily enough, the finish made my lips look dry rather than smooth. It wore well for six hours but was slightly drying over time.  MAC Night to Remember (LE, $15.00) is less frosted. Chanel Dialogue (P, $34.00) is slightly cooler. Chanel Amant (P, $34.00) is a touch lighter. NARS Golshan (P, $25.00) is slightly browner. Milani Cherry Crave (P, $5.49) is more frosted. Guerlain Habit Rouge (P, $35.00) is darker. See comparison swatches.

Chanel Rouge Allure Luminous Intense Lip Colour Impulsive (132)
6.5
Product
10
Pigmentation
8.5
Texture
10
Longevity
4.5
Application
88%
Total
Chanel Rouge Allure Luminous Intense Lip Colour Enigmatique (135)
7
Product
9.5
Pigmentation
8.5
Texture
10
Longevity
4.5
Application
88%
Total

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The Face Chart by Dustin Hunter Overview & Photos

The Face Chart by Dustin Hunter
The Face Chart by Dustin Hunter

The Face Chart is a tool that helps makeup artists or enthusiasts capture makeup looks on paper–but more like a canvas that takes well to makeup. It’s designed by friend and reader, Dustin Hunter (of YouTube fame), using an original design that really captures the nuances of what elements are needed in something like this. It uses textured paper that can be used with cream as well as powder products. On the right, you’ll find the blank face, and on the left, you’ll find plenty of space to note the products you’ve used to create the look. Each sheet is standard A-size (8.5″ by 11″) and can also be slid into clear protector sheets and into a binder to create a portfolio or book to flip through.

I really like just how detailed these are from cover-to-cover. It just feels like a product that someone who needed them personally, so they knew exactly what was missing from other versions and what they needed in their own, that then was extended to the world. The cover itself lifts on the opposite end you’d expect so that it can keep the loose edges from getting wrinkled, damaged, and torn, as the binding on the other side protects that side. I’ve been playing with them here and there in my spare time, and though I have nothing I’m proud enough of to share with you, I did con Dustin into sending me some that he’s done so I could show you what these are capable of! (Also, so I could have some study material for my own attempts.)

They’re available in a 25-pack (bound so you can keep them together, or you can tear off one sheet at a time to give to a client, post on a wall, etc.) for $12 as well as in a 100-pack (loose, so they are not bound) for $36 (normally $42). Dustin recommends using a setting spray (the type used for pencil and charcoal drawings) to set everything and to prevent any smudging. All of the finished ones I have in my possession have stayed beautifully intact without smudging or fading. For anyone who loves makeup and has an inner artist, it’s a great way to play. I have absolutely no artistic inclination, but I’m slowly but surely working my way to, “maybe one day I’ll share with the class,” but for now, it’s something nice to do as a stress-reliever.

The binding has held up well to prolonged use, tossing into bags and backpacks, and doesn’t get sticky. The textured paper isn’t too thick or too thin–it has a good weight to it, though.  I didn’t have any problems getting powder, liquid, and cream products to adhere to the paper, either, and in the past, some paper takes well to creams but not as well to powder, so it’s nice to be able to reach for any type of product and use it with The Face Chart. I also appreciate that there is actually enough space to write on the left, both in terms of overall area but also in the height of each line.

If you’ve always wanted to experiment with face charts of your own, I hope you’ll consider these! They’re well-made, beautifully drawn, and work well for their purpose. If you’re interested, Temptalia readers can purchase these for 20% off with code temptalia (all lowercase) now through November 11th at The Face Chart! 🙂

See more photos!

MAC 2x Dare Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette

MAC 2x Dare Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette
MAC 2x Dare Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette

MAC 2x Dare Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette ($44.00 for 0.14 oz.) contains five eyeshadows. If you’re not familiar with the newer Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palettes, they feature a newer eyeshadow formula that can be used wet or dry. The range tends to lean towards the more frosted, metallic, and glittery, though it technically can range from matte to glitter. This particular palette is the cooler-toned of the two, though I wouldn’t say it’s all that cool-toned overall. It is also very, very frosted–if you are not a fan of shimmer or frost, you’ll want to stay clear of this one. If you love high-shine, shimmery, metallic finishes, then you may quite enjoy the formula.  2x Dare was one of the better palettes I’ve tried in this formula, though it wasn’t without its share of flaws–some light fading before the eight-hour mark, some fall out with the second shade, but there were no total misses in this palette.

2x Dare #1 is a bright, creamy white with a high frost, metallic finish. It had so-so color payoff applied dry, but it came together better when applied damp; it was more opaque and smoother. Dior Lune (001) (P, $30.00) is slightly warmer. Disney by Sephora Midnight Hour #1 (LE) is similar. Disney by Sephora Ball Gown (LE) is similar. theBalm Sassy (P, $16.00) is less metallic. theBalm Metal-ica (P, $16.00) is less metallic. MAC Flawless Figure (LE, $15.00) is cooler-toned. MAC Pearl (LE, $32.50) is also cooler-toned. Inglot #453 (P, $6.00) is more metallic. See comparison swatches.

2x Dare #2 is a glittery, muted golden bronze with a metallic, glittery finish. The texture was a bit loose, slightly chunky because of the glitter, and the color payoff was decent but didn’t seem affected by a wet or dry application. MAC Until Dawn #2 (LE, $21.00) is yellower. Sleek MakeUP Meet in Madrid (LE, $9.99) is yellower, less glittery. MAC Retrospeck (P, $15.00) is slightly more golden. Dior Fairy Golds #2 (LE) is similar. Chanel Apparence (LE, $36.00) is a cream product. bareMinerals Kudos (LE) is less glittery. See comparison swatches.

2x Dare #3 is a cool-toned, gray-leaning taupe with subtle, cool brown undertones and an array of plum, bronze, and silver shimmer/sparkle. It was sheer applied dry, but it was mostly opaque when applied damp, and it also smoothed out more when applied damp. Urban Decay Armor (LE, $18.00) is less gray. Urban Decay Mushroom (P, $18.00) is lighter. MAC Dynamic Duo 3 #1 (LE, $15.00) is less frosted. MAC Dangerous Cuvee (P, $18.50) is a cream product. MAC Electroplate (LE, $18.50) is less frosted. Inglot #434 (P, $6.00) is less sparkly but very similar. See comparison swatches.

2x Dare #4 is a dirty, muted brown with a gray, yellow, and brown mix of sparkle and tone. It’s a very murky shade. I would almost call it pewter, because it’s not quite brown, but it’s not a bronze or gold either. It seemed to be more similar to other pewter-hued shades, though, so I’d classify it closest to that, but it’s a little warmer/browner. It was semi-opaque applied dry, fully opaque applied damp, and it had a more metallic finish when applied damp. Dior Millenium (381) (P, $30.00) is a cream product. Chanel Moon River (LE, $34.00) is lighter, cream product. MAC Silver Birch (LE, $21.00) is cooler-toned. MAC Modern Pewter (LE, $21.00) is lighter. See comparison swatches.

2x Dare #5 is a cool-toned, gray-leaning taupe with a plummy-brown undertone and a light pearly shimmer. This was the least frosted/metallic shade in the palette. It had a slightly drier texture, which gave it less intense color payoff both applied dry and damp. MAC Graphic Style (LE, $15.00) is lighter. Dior Aventure (081) (P, $30.00) is warmer, cream product. Disney by Sephora Midnight Hour #4 (LE) is similar. Urban Decay Armor (LE, $18.00) is more frosted. MAC Dynamic Duo 3 #1 (LE, $15.00) is grayer. MAC Twilight Falls (LE, $21.00) is similar, slightly warmer. MAC Moth Brown (LE, $15.00) is a touch purpler. MAC Stolen Moment (LE, $21.00) is purpler. See comparison swatches.

The MAC x RiRi Hearts MAC Holiday Collection launches in December. I don’t have a specific date yet, and as soon as I do, you’ll see me update the collection’s official information post. Your best bet is to catch me on Twitter or Facebook, as I usually make a mention on social media first 🙂

MAC Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette 2x Dare
2x Dare
2x Dare
8
Product
8
Pigmentation
8
Texture
8
Longevity
4.5
Application
81%
Total
See All Glossovers

Also In This Review

B

2x Dare #1

Limited Edition
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C-

2x Dare #2

Limited Edition
Read Review
B

2x Dare #3

Limited Edition
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B+

2x Dare #4

Limited Edition
Read Review
B-

2x Dare #5

Limited Edition
Read Review
We hope you'll consider supporting Temptalia by shopping through our links below. Thanks!

MAC Phresh Out Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette

MAC Phresh Out Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette
MAC Phresh Out Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette

MAC Phresh Out Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette ($44.00 for 0.14 oz.) contains five eyeshadows. If you’re not familiar with the newer Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palettes, they feature a newer eyeshadow formula that can be used wet or dry. The range tends to lean towards the more frosted, metallic, and glittery, though it technically can range from matte to glitter. This particular palette is the warmer-toned of the two and has two particularly glittery shades in it. If you are not a fan of shimmer or frost, you’ll want to stay clear of this one. If you love high-shine, shimmery, metallic finishes, then you may quite enjoy the formula.  Phresh Out has two shades that are particularly glittery, so wear was poor with fall out occurring throughout the wear and some fading with the first shade as well.

Phresh Out #1 is a pale, golden beige with a frosted finish. It had decent color payoff when applied dry, and it was smoother and slightly more pigmented when applied damp. Disney by Sephora Sea Shells (LE) is slightly yellower. Urban Decay Polyester Bride (P, $18.00) is similar. MAC Dazzlelight (P, $15.00) is less frosted. Inglot #395 (P, $6.00) is more beige, less frosted, more metallic. See comparison swatches.

Phresh Out #2 is a glittery, warm-toned copper with a golden sheen and copper micro-glitter/sparkle. It had a slightly dry, kind of chunky consistency that was best applied damp, as it yielded more color payoff and helped to bind the shadow together. Too Faced Prancer (LE) is darker. Sleek MakeUP Sunset #10 (P, $9.99) is similar. MAC Creative Copper (LE, $15.00) is more golden. Maybelline Breaking Bronze (P, $6.99) is more metallic. Disney by Sephora All Aglow (LE) is more muted. Disney by Sephora Cosmic (LE) is similar. theBalm Manic Maribel (LE, $16.00) is less glittery. Urban Decay Penny Lane (LE, $18.00) is similar but less glittery. See comparison swatches.

Phresh Out #3 is a pink-tinged beige with a glittery finish. Applied dry, it’s just a sheer glittery mess, but applied damp, it binds together better so there’s some color as well as glitter. LORAC Nude (P) is less glittery. MAC Love Connection #1 (P, $21.00) is a bit darker. MAC Light Touch (P, $21.00) is lighter. MAC Snow Season (LE, $21.00) is darker. MAC Star Crystal (LE, $32.50) is pinker. Dior Fairy Golds #1 (LE) is less glittery. See comparison swatches.

Phresh Out #4 is a taupe with a stronger gray/purple cast with subtle warm, rosy brown undertones and a frosted sheen. It had good color payoff both wet and dry, and the finish becomes more sheen-like when applied damp. Marc Jacobs Beauty The Starlet #1 (P) is similar. MAC Hypnotizing (LE, $15.00) is a touch lighter. MAC Stolen Moment (LE, $21.00) is darker. See comparison swatches.

Phresh Out #5 is a dark brown with subtle cool undertones and a satiny sheen. It had nice pigmentation both dry and wet, though applied damp had a richer, deeper color. LORAC Espresso (P) is darker, more matte. Dior Night Golds #3 (LE) is darker. Urban Decay Busted (LE, $18.00) is similar. See comparison swatches.

The MAC x RiRi Hearts MAC Holiday Collection launches in December. I don’t have a specific date yet, and as soon as I do, you’ll see me update the collection’s official information post. Your best bet is to catch me on Twitter or Facebook, as I usually make a mention on social media first 🙂

MAC Veluxe Pearlfusion Eyeshadow Palette Phresh Out
Phresh Out
Phresh Out
7.5
Product
8
Pigmentation
8
Texture
8
Longevity
4.5
Application
80%
Total
See All Glossovers

Also In This Review

B-

Phresh Out #1

Limited Edition
Read Review
D+

Phresh Out #2

Limited Edition
Read Review
C-

Phresh Out #3

Limited Edition
Read Review
B+

Phresh Out #4

Limited Edition
Read Review
A

Phresh Out #5

Limited Edition
Read Review

NARS x Guy Bourdin Color & Gifting Collection Photos, Swatches + Commentary

NARS x Guy Bourdin Color Collection
NARS x Guy Bourdin Color Collection

Update:  I have added photos, swatches, and dupes for the products from the NARS x Guy Bourdin Gifting Collection.  The majority of the shades included in the Gifting collection are permanent to NARS’ color range. To ensure context, I’ve added them to the existing post, rather than make a separate post.  My goal is to raise awareness, open the channel for discussion (I highly recommend reading through readers’ comments and viewpoints), and to respect each reader’s autonomy and decision-making.  I strongly believe that we each must do our own research and come to the conclusion that feels right to us, whatever that may be.  Thank you for your continued support, respect, and understanding!

When the NARS x Guy Bourdin collaboration was first announced, I felt my readers’ excitement. I knew nothing about Bourdin, and having little interest in fashion photography, I didn’t look to learn any more than what was being widely reported. I’m here for the makeup, not the collaborators or inspiration or names, so when I see a new collection, I want to know what’s in it, what the colors are going to be, what the formulas and textures will feel like. It was not until I saw more and more readers comment on Bourdin and his emphasis on violence in his work, particularly of what seems to be best categorized as “high fashion crime scenes,” that I knew I needed to look a little further than the press release.

Warning:  This post contains discussion about violence against women, so please be warned that the discussion that follows and comments on the post may be a potentially triggering.

Bourdin’s body of work is not solely centered around violence as he also explored other themes like surrealism and sexuality. There are shots of vibrant, thriving women in his work; it is not all dark but certainly a good deal of his work is, and more to the point, many of his more controversial shots are more famous (which is not a surprise). I suggest visiting his website and browsing through his portfolio of photos–beware that some are more graphic than others–and in particular, the “Beauty” section showcases a different side of his work. There is no question that Bourdin was an artist, and he is legendary in his sphere.

I fully respect NARS’ decision to collaborate with someone who has influenced Francois Nars not just today but for years; that Bourdin was his inspiration for becoming a makeup artist is just how telling of the type and scope of impact Bourdin had on the industry as a whole. I don’t just see in black and white, which is not always a comforting thing, and I enjoy challenging people’s opinions and playing devil’s advocate. It has always been important to me to avoid mixing my personal beliefs (on such hot topics as sex, politics, religion, etc.) with the blog, because Temptalia is not just your escape but mine. This is the first time where how I feel has put me in such a quandary as to how to react.  First and foremost, I am abstaining from reviewing the NARS and Guy Bourdin collection, because I cannot fully dissociate how I feel about Bourdin’s art from a collection intended to pay tribute to him.

The idea that an advertisement or runway photoshoot that features dead women in designer clothing and shoes is used to sell to people is hard for me to wrap my head around. I am particularly sensitive to the concept of glamorizing violence, against women or men, because I worry it normalizes it in a way that makes us react less to a very real and prevalent issue not just in the U.S. but globally. Bourdin has passed away for some time now, so all of the visuals that showcase Bourdin’s work are images he previously shot, so none of them were originally intended to sell NARS’ makeup specifically (or possibly makeup at all, but you’d have to really go back through and figure out where each photo originated from). Many of the selected images for the NARS collaboration are not controversial or violent but some are certainly up for interpretation.

There’s an informative interview with Susan B. Carbon, Director of the U.S. DOJ’s Office, Violence Against Women, which also includes sobering statistics about the level of violence women experience (with sources cited). It speaks on and illuminates as to why violence against women is a real issue that we should be talking about, understanding, researching, and creating the resources, community, and culture that both prevents and reduces the violence that occurs (and we can do more than just prevent/reduce violence against women but all people). We, as a society, have made strides towards these goals, but we can do more and we should do more–and we need to remember to think globally on behalf of all women.

Here are some resources for learning more about this issue:

I have spent the past week and a half soul-searching and doing as much as I can to learn more about Bourdin, not just from those that feel similarly to me, but those who have assessed his work from an artistic point of view, to determine if I was still going to post photos/swatches. My focus was on his work, not him as a person.  We all want to be taken as the sum of our parts, not merely one part out of many, which is why I really wanted to take time to assess, digest, and react. I found this essay about the evolution of the “crime scene photograph” into news, fashion, and art a very good read. I understand that not everyone who views Bourdin’s work feels he glamorized violence against women or even if taken as true, is able to find other qualities of his work (lighting, colors, angles, composition, etc.) admirable as an artist or perhaps argue it is a statement on our own curiosity for the morbid or even the fashion industry and its consumptive nature. I have read various reactions, arguments for and against, from both outside sources as well as from readers in our community.

To that end, I respect each reader’s opinion, whether for or against.  So in a show of respect for a broad range of opinions, while I will not review or otherwise recommend the collection personally, you will find full photos and swatches of the products featured in the color collection for those who wanted to see them, and for those who did not want to purchase, I have included dupes for each shade that you may want to consider purchasing from instead.   From me to you, I wanted to use this time to also say, “Let’s not forget about what we can do to reduce violence against women.” In our consumption of controversial images, let’s not forget about the very real issues that real people face that the art seeks to recreate or transform.

I hope that you understand my decisions and know that they come from the heart after a lot of reflection, research, and reading. I urge you to do your own research and come to your own conclusions. All I want is us to ask questions and challenge what we’re seeing and being told (or sold) and go from there.

Update: Thank you SO, SO much from the bottom of my heart for the outpouring of support & understanding!  I am still reading through and responding to the incredible stories and comments that you have all left on this post, but I wanted to make sure everyone knows how meaningful your feedback and response has been! Thank you!

See dupes, photos & swatches!

MAC Cockiness & Pisces Persuasion Superslick Eyeliners

MAC Cockiness Superslick Eyeliner
MAC Cockiness Superslick Eyeliner

MAC Cockiness Superslick Eyeliner ($20.50 for 0.06 fl. oz.) is described as a “shimmery rose gold [with a Frost finish].” It’s more like a brightened, medium copper with barely-there pink, gold, and copper shimmer. I tried to look at it several different lighting situations to see if it turned more rose gold, but it always looked rather coppery. It had mostly opaque color coverage and seemed quite pigmented in a single stroke. There are actually not that bad coppery eyeliners–this post compares a few here but none really compare favorably. MAC Rich Ground (P, $16.00) is much darker and browner. Giorgio Armani Copper (05) is lighter. See comparison swatches.

MAC Pisces Persuasion Superslick Eyeliner ($20.50 for 0.06 fl. oz.) is described as a “shimmery white [with a Frost finish].” It’s a milky white with neutral to slightly cool undertones and a white shimmer. This one was a little more translucent; it applied evenly but the milky white wasn’t fully opaque in one go. I think this might be better layered over something else. I couldn’t think of a dupe for this; I only could think of two eyeliners that were white but both were totally matte.

Neither of these eyeliners are going to be going anywhere once they’ve dried down and set.  They were easy to remove with a cleansing oil (I used shu’s), but I would opt for whatever your go-to remover is for anything super long-wearing or hard to remove, because a lot of lightweight makeup removers will struggle to remove these.  They are definitely waterproof and smudge-proof once dried.  The consistency, however, is watery initially, and because I applied to my lower lash line, I noticed that the first go-round, Pisces Persuasion actually pooled downward as it was setting–so just be careful where and how you apply it.

The MAC x RiRi Hearts MAC Holiday Collection launches in December. I don’t have a specific date yet, and as soon as I do, you’ll see me update the collection’s official information post. Your best bet is to catch me on Twitter or Facebook, as I usually make a mention on social media first 🙂

MAC Superslick Liquid Eyeliner Cockiness
Cockiness
Cockiness
9
Product
9
Pigmentation
8.5
Texture
10
Longevity
4.5
Application
91%
Total
MAC Superslick Liquid Eyeliner Pisces Persuasion
8
Product
7.5
Pigmentation
8.5
Texture
10
Longevity
4.5
Application
86%
Total

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