Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Wet 'n' Wild Your 15 Minutes Aren't Up Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio
Wet ‘n’ Wild Your 15 Minutes Aren’t Up Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

Wet ‘n’ Wild Your 15 Minutes Aren’t Up Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio ($2.99 for 0.12 oz.) contains a yellow, purple, and medium-dark pink eyeshadow. It’s a limited edition trio that you may still find, or you may be out of luck. I’ve asked my local stores, and they haven’t heard anything, and I haven’t seen them myself (in-stores), but I know they’ve released elsewhere and been cleaned out quickly.

This post, more or less, is to let you know that your time (and money) might be better spent elsewhere. Initially, I was actually able to get some color to adhere and show up on the lid without using a creamy white base, but all of the colors just fade so quickly–in mere hours. Of course, though touted as long-wearing and highly-pigmented, all three shades were completely gone after four hours of wear without a primer. Over a regular primer, there was significant fading but a hint of color left after six hours (these eyeshadows just eat primer!), and then over NYX Milk, they lasted seven hours with some fading and had better color payoff, too.

Your 15 Minutes Aren’t Up #1 is a light-medium yellow with a satin finish. It had so-so color payoff, but it was very powdery and somewhat chalky, so it was very easily sheered out during application. Your best bet is to pat it on, and if possible, over something tacky/creamy. Fyrinnae Banana Mochi is more shimmery. MAC Bright Yellow is slightly lighter, more matte. See comparison swatches.

Your 15 Minutes Aren’t Up #2 is a medium purple with subtle cool undertones and a satiny, almost matte, finish. It was very powdery and somewhat chalky, and it suffered from the same issues as the yellow eyeshadow–incredibly prone to sheering out on the lid during application. NARS Flowers 1 #3 is more satin-like. MAC Spoiled Rich is warmer. MAC Shock-a-holic is brighter. Inglot #386 is slightly warmer. See comparison swatches.

Your 15 Minutes Aren’t Up #3 is a warm, medium-dark pink with a matte finish. Like the other two, it was powdery and chalky, but it was the least powdery and chalky of the three. It had so-so color payoff but did sheer out easily on the lid. Urban Decay Noise is cooler-toned. MAC Tease with Ease is more shimmery. MAC Gameela is redder. Guerlain Terra Azzurra #2 is cooler-toned. Dior Bow is darker. See comparison swatches.

There are three other trios, and I did take photos/swatches of all them (as well as I’ve tested them all) — how would you feel about me just posting swatches and just an overview (no dupes or shade-by-shade review)? I’d like to just kick ’em out, but it’s always hard for me to post without a full review! Let me know what you’d like to see in the comments :)

The Glossover

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palette

Your 15 Minutes Aren't Up

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Product

6/10

Pigmentation

7.5/10

Texture

6/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

3/5

Results
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product

Your 15 Minutes Aren't Up #1

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Product

6/10

Pigmentation

7/10

Texture

6/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

3/5

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Your 15 Minutes Aren't Up #2

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Product

6/10

Pigmentation

7/10

Texture

6/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

3/5

Results
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Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Wet 'n' Wild A Regular at the Factory Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio
Wet ‘n’ Wild A Regular at the Factory Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio

Wet ‘n’ Wild A Regular at the Factory Color Icon Eyeshadow Trio ($2.99 for 0.12 oz.) is a limited edition palette for summer, so you’ll have to hunt around your local drugstores for this one (I’ve yet to spot any of the Pop Art displays in my area, which means it hasn’t arrived yet or it has already sold out!). This was one of the “better” trios I tested, though it was still underwhelming, due to the incredible powderiness across the shades. These absolutely need to be worn over a primer, because they are prone to fading and creasing–they lasted a mere four hours before fading significantly without a primer–and even over primer, they didn’t last beyond eight hours.  They’re powdery, easily sheered out (but harder to build up), prone to fading, and really do not show why Color Icon eyeshadows were so coveted when they first debuted. (And Color Icon is a formula touted as highly pigmented and long-wearing.)

A Regular at the Factory #1 is a muted, light-medium yellow with a mostly matte finish. This shade was powdery, slightly chalky, so it was prone to sheering out when applied. It’s best to pat and pack it on and only blend the very edges as necessary. NARS Misfit #1 is less yellow. Make Up For Ever #102 is lighter. See comparison swatches.

A Regular at the Factory #2 is a medium, cyan blue with a matte finish. It had so-so color payoff as it was powdery, so the color didn’t bind well together, which gave it a slightly uneven appearance. Again, pat and pack on the eyeshadow to maximize the color and minimize the fall out–and if you have a slightly tacky base, even better. NARS Mad, Mad World #1 is darker. Milani Olympian Blue is much darker. MAC Electric Eel is slightly darker. Make Up For Ever #72 is similar. Make Up For Ever #118 is lighter. Inglot #371 is very similar. See comparison swatches.

A Regular at the Factory #3 is a brightened, medium orange with yellow undertones and a mostly matte finish. It had fairly good pigmentation, and it was the least powdery of the three. Fyrinnae Pyromantic Erotica is more shimmery. Disney Rajah is darker. Illamasqua Vulgar is slightly lighter. See comparison swatches.

The Glossover

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A Regular at the Factory

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They're powdery, easily sheered out (but harder to build up), prone to fading, and really do not show why Color Icon eyeshadows were so coveted when they first debuted.

Product

6.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

7.5/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

3.5/5

Results
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A Regular at the Factory #1

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Product

6.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

7/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

3.5/5

Results
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A Regular at the Factory #2

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Product

6.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

7/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

3.5/5

Results
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Saturday, August 24th, 2013

NYX Milk Jumbo Eye Pencil
NYX Milk Jumbo Eye Pencil

NYX Milk Jumbo Eye Pencil ($4.49 for 0.18 oz.) is a stark, cool-toned white with a matte finish. Maybelline Too Cool is shimmery. Buxom Sheep Dog is shimmery, less cool-toned. Make Up For Ever #32E is shimmery, warm-toned. Make Up For Ever #4 is shimmery. See comparison swatches.

Milk is fairly creamy, slightly thick, and applies with mostly opaque color in a single pass. It layers and builds up well, so you can get a crisp, opaque white all-over the lid, which is why it boosts the color of any product with weak pigmentation. The pencils come in a whole slew of shades, too, but the white hue works well to amplify color without muting or really altering the color of any product you layer over it.  It doesn’t set immediately, so it’s a good idea to lightly blend the color across the lid, which helps to even out the application and ensure it’s not too thick and settles into creases while setting.

If NYX’s Jumbo Eye Pencils wear well on you, Milk can be a life-saver, as it instantly boosts the performance of even terrible products. If you’ve tried them and they have a tendency to crease on you, then it won’t be as useful as a product for you. I know that readers have long reported both excellent and dismal wear. I’m in the camp where these wear quite well on me without fading or creasing for eight hours (but show faint signs of creasing after nine hours), and if layered with powder, perform even better.  NYX also gives you quite a bit of product–0.18 oz. as compared to the more typical 0.10 oz. (Urban Decay, Clinique) or. 0.14 oz. (MUFE, NARS) found in these jumbo-sized pencils. Now, the only downside is that it requires sharpening, and because of how creamy it is, there is waste–which is common across this type of product, not just with NYX.

The Glossover

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Milk

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Product

9.5/10

Pigmentation

9.5/10

Texture

9.5/10

Longevity

9/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Dupes
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Saturday, August 24th, 2013

Real Techniques Expert Face Brush
Real Techniques Expert Face Brush

Real Techniques Expert Face Brush ($8.99) is designed for applying and blending cream or liquid foundation. The brush head is 25mm in length, 30mm in width, and 20mm in thickness. The brush had a total length of 6 inches/15.5 centimeters. The brush is soft, dense, firm (with some give but not fluffy or springy). The edge is slightly rounded, but the most noticeable characteristic about the brush is just how dense it is. It is even denser than the Buffing Brush. I bought this brush after a few readers asked how it compared to Tom Ford’s Cream Foundation Brush, and I don’t think they’re similar in terms of shape, density, and so forth, but the end results achieved with both brushes are more comparable. I do get better and more effortless results with Tom Ford’s, as it doesn’t streak at all for me, but this brush does so occasionally. The rounded, slightly tapered edge makes it easy to buff and blend out any streaks, though, and the synthetic bristles of this brush means it works better with cream and liquid products and is easier to clean. In a blind softness test, I ran both brushes across my husband’s forearm (and I had him do the same for me) three times for each (and at random), Tom Ford always came out on top as softer, but Real Techniques is still very, very soft. I would not complain; I would not even notice, if I didn’t have Tom Ford to compare it to–the way I used this often reminded me of how I used to use MAC’s 109, and this is softer than that brush.

Real Techniques Core Collection ($17.99 for set of four brushes) includes a Buffing Brush, Contour Brush, Pointed Foundation Brush, and Detailer Brush, plus a case to carry them in. For the price, you’re getting a nice amount of brushes, but as with kits, they’re not all as equally useful and ultimately whether you love and use all four regularly will depend entirely on your personal routine and brush preferences. The Buffing and Contour Brushes are both shapes that I think many would use and appreciate, while the Pointed Foundation and Detailer Brushes will be less applicable for all. I really wish you could purchase these brushes individually as well, because I could easily see getting a second Buffing Brush, or if you loved the Detailer Brush, having two or three might be nice for anyone who needs the precision.

Buffing Brush is a medium-sized, wide circular brush that widens at the end and has an ever-so-slightly domed edge. The brush head is 30mm in length, 35mm in width (at its widest point), and 30mm in thickness. In total, the brush has a length of 6 inches/15.5 centimeters. It’s a really nice, multi-tasking brush that can be used to apply foundation (though it says powder, I’ve used it with both powder, cream, and liquid, and it worked fine across all three), blend out blushes and bronzers, or to apply setting powder. It’s densely-packed with soft bristles that feel nice against the skin.

Contour Brush is a small, domed-shaped brush that’s soft, lightly fluffy, and not too dense. The brush head is 30mm in length, 18mm in width, and 18mm in thickness. The brush has a total length of 6.25 inches/15.7 centimeters. It has a good amount of spring so it blends, but it isn’t floppy, so it still retains its shape. It fits nicely into the hollow of the cheeks, so it definitely works exceptionally well for contouring (especially with cream products), but I also quite liked it for applying highlighters on the cheek bones and down the nose as well as for applying cream blushes for a more feathery application. Of the brushes in the set, this was my favorite.

Pointed Foundation Brush was surprisingly small for a flat foundation brush. The brush head is 27mm in length, 15mm in width, and 5mm in thickness. The total length of the brush is 6 inches/15.5 centimeters. It would work better for applying a liquid or cream product to the face, but then using another brush to actually blend and work it into the skin. I often use a concealer brush to dab my liquid foundation in spots on my face before blending the foundation all-over with something larger and denser, so that seemed to be a better use for this than applying foundation all-over. It was very prone to creating lines when I used it for all-over foundation application, so I still needed to go back with something else to buff out all the visible lines. I also tried using it to dab cream highlighters on the cheeks and it was decent, but it doesn’t blend or diffuse the product well enough, so again, a second brush becomes necessary–and I could have just used the second brush for both initial application and subsequent blending.

Detailer Brush is a teeny, tiny firm, flat brush with a tapered edge. The brush head is 9mm in length, 6mm in width, and 3mm in thickness. The whole brush is just under 5.5 inches/14 centimeters. If you have small eyes or deeper crevices around your nose, it might be more useful than your traditional concealer or lip brush as it is much shorter and thinner. This brush was scratchy/rough; when I would pat it underneath the eye for concealer, I could feel a few bristles “stabbing” the skin.

Every brush seemed well-balanced; they weren’t top-heavy or bottom-heavy, so I had good control and they felt good in my hands and as I used them during application. I’ve been using these brushes for several weeks (with the exception of the Expert Face Brush, which I’ve only been using for almost two weeks).  I had few splayed bristles on the Buffing Brush when it arrived and haven’t quite been able to get them to re-shape perfectly, so I might trim those stray ones out.  I’ve only had a few bristles shed during the first few uses with the Buffing and Expert Face Brushes (which is normal!).  I haven’t had any issues cleaning or re-shaping them, and they haven’t bled dye during washes or smelled funny after drying.

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Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

L'Oreal Florid Pink Colour Riche Le Gloss
L’Oreal Florid Pink Colour Riche Le Gloss

L’Oreal Florid Pink Colour Riche Le Gloss ($7.99 for 0.40 fl. oz.) is a cool-toned, blue-based cotton candy pink with a creamy finish. It had semi-sheer color coverage, and it did settle slightly into lip lines. Edward Bess First Kiss is warmer. MAC Next Fad is warmer, more shimmery. MAC Saint Germain is cooler-toned, lighter. MAC Pink Nouveau is more opaque, slightly cooler-toned. MAC Petite Indulgence is lighter. See comparison swatches.

Pucker-Up Pink Colour Riche Le Gloss ($7.99 for 0.40 fl. oz.) is a sheer pink with pink and silver shimmer. The gloss really appears mostly colorless applied, but there is a lot of visible shimmer. Urban Decay Trashed has finer shimmer. MAC Fashion Fanatic is milkier. MAC Demure is lighter. MAC Floating Lotus is similar. Bobbi Brown Pastel is also similar. See comparison swatches.

Colour Riche Le Gloss has a very smooth, jelly-like texture that is comfortable to wear and non-sticky.  It is creamy, glossy, and the pigmentation seems to vary from shade to shade.  They have a strong, sweet,burnt caramel scent but no discernible taste (it reminded me of the older Urban Decay Lipsticks).  Florid Pink lasted two hours on me, and Pucker-Up Pink a shorter one and a half hours.  The formula is moderately hydrating, so if you don’t mind reapplying often, you may still like the formula.

Both shades are part of a limited edition collection that I’ve only seen in stores–I was personally hoping it would go online, because none of the lip products have any type of seal in-store. After I checked three or four glosses/lipsticks and found them tested, I walked away without buying anything. I really wish L’Oreal (and all brands) would seal products that sit on displayers for any and all to grab.

The Glossover

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Florid Pink

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Product

8/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

9/10

Longevity

6/10

Application

4/5

Results
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Dupes
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Pucker-Up Pink

B-

Product

8.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

9/10

Longevity

5/10

Application

5/5

Results
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Monday, August 5th, 2013

Fyrinnae Lucky Charmed Eyeshadow
Fyrinnae Lucky Charmed Eyeshadow

Fyrinnae Lucky Charmed Eyeshadow ($6.25 for 0.11 oz.) is described as a “lush, metallic golden green with a touch of green sparkle throughout.” It’s a rich, medium-dark molten gold with strong yellow and brown undertones and a subtle green micro-shimmer. It was mostly opaque applied with a damp brush or applied over Pixie Epoxy. Fyrinnae Aztec Gold is more metallic and slightly greener. Too Faced Instigator is more golden. Marc Jacobs The Starlet #5 is lighter. Urban Decay Spell #1 is glittery. Urban Decay Stargazer is greener. NARS Paramaribo #1 is similar. Le Metier de Beaute Chameleon is warmer, browner. Make Up For Ever #11 is a cream product, lighter. Inglot #433 is similar. See comparison swatches.

Wicked Eyeshadow ($6.25 for 0.11 oz.) is described as a “deep, dark purple with turquoise shimmer.” It’s a rich, dark pink-toned purple base with teal shimmer. It’s very interesting and complex, and I don’t have anything quite like this that I can recall. The downside is that it feels somewhat dry, and it didn’t apply as smoothly or as evenly as many other Fyrinnae eyeshadows have for me. It seemed to be an eyeshadow that applied differently every time I tried it.

Biker Chic Eyeshadow ($6.25 for 0.11 oz.) is described as a “turquoise-blue sparkle on a deep black base.” It’s a cool-toned, dark black base color with blue-teal shimmer. Applied dry, it is blacker with only a smattering of shimmer, but applied over Pixie Epoxy, then the shimmer is much more apparent. The texture is very finely-milled, but it’s definitely a shade that it is easier blended when it is dry than wet or used over Pixie Epoxy, as it tends to stick slightly. I thought it was best when applied over Pixie Epoxy to maximize the shimmer, and then going over it the edge lightly with dry product to blend. Sephora Midnight Swim isn’t black-based. Milani Mix It Up is greener. MAC Magic Spell is darker, less blue/teal. See comparison swatches.

When I wore these three together, I had had slight fading with Wicked after seven hours but the other shades did not show any signs of wear (no primer but over Pixie Epoxy). Over a primer (and Pixie Epoxy), I still saw some fading with Wicked, but it wasn’t until eight and a half hours, while the other shades continued to remain strong and crease-free.

The Glossover

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Lucky Charmed

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Product

9.5/10

Pigmentation

9.5/10

Texture

10/10

Longevity

10/10

Application

5/5

Results
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Dupes
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Wicked

B

Product

8.5/10

Pigmentation

8.5/10

Texture

8.5/10

Longevity

8/10

Application

4/5

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Biker Chic

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Product

9/10

Pigmentation

9/10

Texture

9/10

Longevity

10/10

Application

4.5/5

Results
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Dupes

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