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Round-up: Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat
Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is available in twelve shades, and I’ve reviewed eleven of them (I should get the last one reviewed in the next couple of weeks!). For the most part, they’re a miss; they don’t do well on their own, and they are, at best, okay at layering. Some Topcoats were better at layering than others, but I often encountered issues with how the Topcoat would dry down over another lip product and make it “crack” or lift in places. Personally, I’d be more inclined to use a gloss for layering or pat on an eyeshadow or some glitter.

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Urban Decay Litter, White Lie, 3rd Degree Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

01/10

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Litter Topcoat over Perversion Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Litter Topcoat over Perversion Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Litter Topcoat over Perversion Vice Lipstick

Litter

Urban Decay Litter Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is has a clear base with micro-glitter that reflects between pink, lavender, and green. It was very subtle on bare lips, and as there was not much base color or finish, it looked like haphazardly applied glitter on its own, but the dry down emphasized the texture of my lips. On its own, it only lasted for an hour or less. When layered, it added subtle bits of glitter on the lips but seemed to go on a bit more evenly. The layering did seem to create patchiness and “split” the underlying lipstick along my lip lines, though.

The brand describes the formula as a “shade-shifting topcoat” that can be used over their “cream, metallized, and matte shades” of Vice Lipstick or any of the Vice Liquid Lipsticks, but–wait for it–“or wear these shades alone.” They’re supposed to be a “comfortable, gel-cream formula that dries down quickly and provides long-lasting wear that never feels sticky” while also creating a “water-resistant barrier that seals in the color underneath.” The brand also warns that your lips might “feel tingly just after applying.”

As a topcoat, I think they perform the best; it can be hit or miss depending on the underlying shade, and some topcoats are more versatile than others (sheerer ones tended to work well with anything, more opaque ones could be hard to apply). I did not feel like they truly locked the underlying lipstick in, as they transferred and still lasted about as long as the lipstick did on its own. I also felt that it was lightly tacky, and it varied, but a few shades would lift color in places. The tingling effect was least pronounced when layered. In general, layering over very light shades was often where they missed and any unevenness became much more visible.

On their own, they often struggled to go on evenly. The application over bare lips was similar to trying to apply some of the darker topcoats over very light or dissimilar colors, which just made any application shortcomings highly visible (compared to say, blue shimmer over a blue lipstick). They had a very strong, lingering tingle where my lips felt like they do after being numbed (like from the dentist)–almost too big, swollen, and a mixture of tingling, cooling, burning. This effect lasted between two to three minutes before subsiding. I wouldn’t say it’s water-resistant, as it seemed to transfer after drinking water, but if I did not drink anything, it was fairly transfer-proof. The wear has been between two and four hours and drying.

The packaging on these doesn’t make sense to me; they have a very thin, brush-type applicator that is terrible for spreading product across the lips, but the formula was often sheerer so getting crisp lines with the included applicator seemed like an exercise in futility. I think a squeeze-tube or more typical doe-foot applicator would have worked here, but I like the idea of a squeeze tube, which would “force” one to use a separate applicator would make more sense, as using it directly on top of another lipstick would result in lipstick transfer to the wand and back into the tube.

  • NYX Stone Cold (P, $6.00) is more shimmery, more pigmented (85% similar).
  • MAC Pearly One (LE, $17.00) is more shimmery, more pigmented (85% similar).
Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat Litter
Litter
Litter
6
Product
9
Pigmentation
6
Texture
6
Longevity
3
Application
67%
Total

Also In This Review

C+
C+

Urban Decay Fever, Ritual, Circuit Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

01/10

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Fever Topcoat over Bittersweet Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Fever Topcoat over Bittersweet Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Fever Topcoat over Bittersweet Vice Lipstick

Fever

Urban Decay Fever Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is a light-medium, coral-orange with warm undertones (a mix of red and orange) paired with pink and silver sparkle. The consistency was thin, not watery but could have easier to spread across the lips (may have been unnecessary hindered by the terrible choice in applicator, though). Of the shades in the line-up, I actually felt like this one looked pretty good alone, as there was enough overall sheen to make it look even while still adding plenty of sparkle. I tried layering it over a Vice Lipstick, and it did not go on as well; it seemed to dry down and “crack” the underlying lipstick and create a tackiness that lifted color after I pressed my lips together (barely!). On its own, Fever wore well for four hours but was somewhat drying. Go figure that one that worked well on its own would have trouble layering, right?

The brand describes the formula as a “shade-shifting topcoat” that can be used over their “cream, metallized, and matte shades” of Vice Lipstick or any of the Vice Liquid Lipsticks, but–wait for it–“or wear these shades alone.” They’re supposed to be a “comfortable, gel-cream formula that dries down quickly and provides long-lasting wear that never feels sticky” while also creating a “water-resistant barrier that seals in the color underneath.” The brand also warns that your lips might “feel tingly just after applying.”

As a topcoat, I think they perform the best; it can be hit or miss depending on the underlying shade, and some topcoats are more versatile than others (sheerer ones tended to work well with anything, more opaque ones could be hard to apply). I did not feel like they truly locked the underlying lipstick in, as they transferred and still lasted about as long as the lipstick did on its own. I also felt that it was lightly tacky, and it varied, but a few shades would lift color in places. The tingling effect was least pronounced when layered. In general, layering over very light shades was often where they missed and any unevenness became much more visible.

On their own, they often struggled to go on evenly. The application over bare lips was similar to trying to apply some of the darker topcoats over very light or dissimilar colors, which just made any application shortcomings highly visible (compared to say, blue shimmer over a blue lipstick). They had a very strong, lingering tingle where my lips felt like they do after being numbed (like from the dentist)–almost too big, swollen, and a mixture of tingling, cooling, burning. This effect lasted between two to three minutes before subsiding. I wouldn’t say it’s water-resistant, as it seemed to transfer after drinking water, but if I did not drink anything, it was fairly transfer-proof. The wear has been between two and four hours and drying.

The packaging on these doesn’t make sense to me; they have a very thin, brush-type applicator that is terrible for spreading product across the lips, but the formula was often sheerer so getting crisp lines with the included applicator seemed like an exercise in futility. I think a squeeze-tube or more typical doe-foot applicator would have worked here, but I like the idea of a squeeze tube, which would “force” one to use a separate applicator would make more sense, as using it directly on top of another lipstick would result in lipstick transfer to the wand and back into the tube.

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat Fever
Fever
Fever
7
Product
10
Pigmentation
8
Texture
8.5
Longevity
4
Application
83%
Total

Also In This Review

D+

Ritual

Permanent
Read Review
D

Circuit

Permanent
Read Review
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Urban Decay Copycat & Bruja Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

01/10

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Copycat Topcoat over Violate Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Copycat Topcoat over Violate Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Copycat Topcoat over Violate Vice Lipstick

Copycat

Urban Decay Copycat Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is medium-dark, reddish copper with warm undertones and flecks of multi-colored glitter. It had a slightly metallic finish that was visible when applied alone, and the glitter was actally less visible than I expected. It had semi-sheer coverage that applied unevenly to the lips, and after it dried down, it did make lips look slightly drier. It lasted for four hours on its own. When I layered it over a creamier Vice Lipstick, it had a tendency to separate the underlying lipstick, so it seemed to take more trial and error to find the right layering combinations.

The brand describes the formula as a “shade-shifting topcoat” that can be used over their “cream, metallized, and matte shades” of Vice Lipstick or any of the Vice Liquid Lipsticks, but–wait for it–“or wear these shades alone.” They’re supposed to be a “comfortable, gel-cream formula that dries down quickly and provides long-lasting wear that never feels sticky” while also creating a “water-resistant barrier that seals in the color underneath.” The brand also warns that your lips might “feel tingly just after applying.”

As a topcoat, I think they perform the best; it can be hit or miss depending on the underlying shade, and some topcoats are more versatile than others (sheerer ones tended to work well with anything, more opaque ones could be hard to apply). I did not feel like they truly locked the underlying lipstick in, as they transferred and still lasted about as long as the lipstick did on its own. I also felt that it was lightly tacky, and it varied, but a few shades would lift color in places. The tingling effect was least pronounced when layered. In general, layering over very light shades was often where they missed and any unevenness became much more visible.

On their own, they often struggled to go on evenly. The application over bare lips was similar to trying to apply some of the darker topcoats over very light or dissimilar colors, which just made any application shortcomings highly visible (compared to say, blue shimmer over a blue lipstick). They had a very strong, lingering tingle where my lips felt like they do after being numbed (like from the dentist)–almost too big, swollen, and a mixture of tingling, cooling, burning. This effect lasted between two to three minutes before subsiding. I wouldn’t say it’s water-resistant, as it seemed to transfer after drinking water, but if I did not drink anything, it was fairly transfer-proof. The wear has been between two and four hours and drying.

The packaging on these doesn’t make sense to me; they have a very thin, brush-type applicator that is terrible for spreading product across the lips, but the formula was often sheerer so getting crisp lines with the included applicator seemed like an exercise in futility. I think a squeeze-tube or more typical doe-foot applicator would have worked here, but I like the idea of a squeeze tube, which would “force” one to use a separate applicator would make more sense, as using it directly on top of another lipstick would result in lipstick transfer to the wand and back into the tube.

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat Copycat
Copycat
Copycat
6
Product
8.5
Pigmentation
7.5
Texture
8.5
Longevity
3
Application
74%
Total

Also In This Review

C+

Bruja

Permanent
Read Review

Urban Decay Monarchy, Reverb, Seether Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

01/10

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Urban Decay Monarchy Topcoat over Venom Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Monarchy Topcoat over Venom Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Monarchy Topcoat over Venom Vice Lipstick

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

Monarchy

Urban Decay Monarchy Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is a cool-toned, sparkling purple with blue and purple glitter. It had larger and finer particles, so the result was slightly metallic with visible sparkle. Alone, it looked a little rough, as the formula clung to lips as it dried down and made them appear slightly shriveled. It had semi-sheer coverage that deepened my lip color while adding shine and sparkle. This was a shade that applied best over richer, brighter, or darker shades (like fuchsia, raspberry pink, purple, black). It lasted three hours on its own and was moderately drying.

The brand describes the formula as a “shade-shifting topcoat” that can be used over their “cream, metallized, and matte shades” of Vice Lipstick or any of the Vice Liquid Lipsticks, but–wait for it–“or wear these shades alone.” They’re supposed to be a “comfortable, gel-cream formula that dries down quickly and provides long-lasting wear that never feels sticky” while also creating a “water-resistant barrier that seals in the color underneath.” The brand also warns that your lips might “feel tingly just after applying.”

As a topcoat, I think they perform the best; it can be hit or miss depending on the underlying shade, and some topcoats are more versatile than others (sheerer ones tended to work well with anything, more opaque ones could be hard to apply). I did not feel like they truly locked the underlying lipstick in, as they transferred and still lasted about as long as the lipstick did on its own. I also felt that it was lightly tacky, and it varied, but a few shades would lift color in places. The tingling effect was least pronounced when layered. In general, layering over very light shades was often where they missed and any unevenness became much more visible.

On their own, they often struggled to go on evenly. The application over bare lips was similar to trying to apply some of the darker topcoats over very light or dissimilar colors, which just made any application shortcomings highly visible (compared to say, blue shimmer over a blue lipstick). They had a very strong, lingering tingle where my lips felt like they do after being numbed (like from the dentist)–almost too big, swollen, and a mixture of tingling, cooling, burning. This effect lasted between two to three minutes before subsiding. I wouldn’t say it’s water-resistant, as it seemed to transfer after drinking water, but if I did not drink anything, it was fairly transfer-proof. The wear has been between two and four hours and drying.

The packaging on these doesn’t make sense to me; they have a very thin, brush-type applicator that is terrible for spreading product across the lips, but the formula was often sheerer so getting crisp lines with the included applicator seemed like an exercise in futility. I think a squeeze-tube or more typical doe-foot applicator would have worked here, but I like the idea of a squeeze tube, which would “force” one to use a separate applicator would make more sense, as using it directly on top of another lipstick would result in lipstick transfer to the wand and back into the tube.

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat Monarchy
Monarchy
Monarchy
7.5
Product
9
Pigmentation
8
Texture
7.5
Longevity
4.5
Application
81%
Total

Also In This Review

C-

Reverb

Permanent
Read Review
B-

Seether

Permanent
Read Review

Sneak Peek: Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat Photos & Swatches

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat
Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoats

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat ($18.00 for 0.16 fl. oz.) is a new product launching later this month that is designed to work as a top coat or worn alone to create “special effects.” There are twelve shades, and I have eleven to share with you today. Be sure to click on the shade’s name to see it layered over a Vice Lipstick – every shade was shown alone as well as over a Vice Lipstick (different ones) to show the effect of layering. My suspicion is that these will work best layered, rather than alone. The brand warns that lips will “feel tingly” as the special effect “locks” in–my lips felt tingly for minutes when worn these alone but was less bothersome when layered.

Urban Decay Vice Special Effects Lip Topcoat

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