Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

Make Up For Ever #214 Small Precision Crease Brush
Make Up For Ever #214 Small Precision Crease Brush

Make Up For Ever #214 Small Precision Crease Brush ($25.00) is described as a “firm, but flexible brush … [for] the crease of the eye.” It’s a long, narrow, and pointed crease brush made out of synthetic fibers. The brush head is 15mm in length, 4mm in width, and 4mm in thickness. It had a round, open metal ferrule and a total brush length of just under 6.75 inches or almost 17 centimeters.

I really didn’t like this brush, as it was incredibly point and didn’t do a good job of placing product in the crease or blending it out. This was also a brush that suffered from continued oiliness/greasiness in the way the bristles felt and acted, so you could squeeze or shape the brush and it would stay that way before very slowly releasing and returning to its original shape (somewhat). It’s a really weird feeling, and it’s not something I remember ever experiencing with other brushes except some of the ones in the Artisan range (I believe this is the third one with this issue). Unfortunately, this doesn’t help the brush in any way, because it makes the brush even less pliable/flexible. Again, I tried washing this two dozen times with an assortment of soaps from dishwashing liquid soap to alcohol-based brush cleansers. The only other brush I have that’s similar in shape is Hakuhodo J5529 ($16), which is a small, narrow crease brush (that actually works).

Make Up For Ever #232 Medium Precision Crease Brush ($28.00) is a long, narrow crease brush with a tapered, point tip. The brush head is 25mm in length, 5mm in width, and 5mm in thickness. It had a round, open metal ferrule and a total brush length of 7 inches or 18 centimeters. The edge felt too tapered and pointed, because using it in the crease made it feel like using a sharp, rough edge, even though if you just brushed the bristles across your hand, they would feel soft. It can deposit color moderately well for both cream and powder products, but it doesn’t blend them out at all, and so many crease brushes are capable of both, so I’m not keen on something as uni-tasking as this shape (plus, it’s not comfortable to use).

I didn’t have any oiliness/greasiness with this particular brush, which was good, but I really didn’t like it. The most comparable brush I have is the MAC 223 (discontinued), which is a longer, narrower crease brush that’s still dome-shaped and rounded at the end, so it is a more ideal shape for crease-work. Make Up For Ever #17S (now discontinued) is not quite as long, wider, and more rounded (as well as fluffier).

The Glossover

product

#214 Small Precision Crease Brush

I really didn't like this brush, as it was incredibly point and didn't do a good job of placing product in the crease or blending it out. This was also a brush that suffered from continued oiliness/greasiness in the way the bristles felt and acted, so you could squeeze or shape the brush and it would stay that way before very slowly releasing and returning to its original shape (somewhat)

Results
Loading ... Loading ...
Login or Register to be able to add this to your Vanity or Wishlist! Plus rate and review!
product

#232 Medium Precision Crease Brush

The edge felt too tapered and pointed, because using it in the crease made it feel like using a sharp, rough edge, even though if you just brushed the bristles across your hand, they would feel soft. It can deposit color moderately well for both cream and powder products, but it doesn't blend them out at all.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...

See more photos! Continue reading →

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

Autumn makes me think of the changing colors of the leaves, rain, and a lingering dampness and crispness in the air–which always makes me think of earthiness. One of my favorite earth tones is greens, and this post is inspired by them; murky, mossy, and dirty greens that are beautiful to wear.

  1. Inglot #419 — a subtly warm-toned, dirty green with a frosted finish
  2. OCC Ripley — a gorgeous, gold-sparkled mossy green with threads of metallic shimmer for your nails
  3. Urban Decay Stash — a classic olive-green eyeliner that’s richly pigmented and glides on easily
  4. Make Up For Ever #84 — a muted, darkened green with neutral-cool undertones
  5. L’Oreal Golden Emerald — a richly pigmented, slightly warm-toned gold-shimmered forest green

What are your top favorites?

Saturday, September 21st, 2013

Make Up For Ever #208 Small Precision Shader Brush
Make Up For Ever #208 Small Precision Shader Brush

Make Up For Ever #208 Small Precision Shader Brush ($22.00) is described as a “small paddle brush ideal for shading.” It’s a small, dome-shaped flat brush. I noticed the edge was visibly uneven at a glance, not just in some crazy magnified macro photo. It’s thin, flat, and very springy. There’s a lot of give and flex to the bristles. It was so-so for applying powder eyeshadow, but I felt like it wasn’t picking up enough product, though it worked well for applying cream eyeshadow to the inner third of the lid as it fit well into that area. The brush head is 5mm in length, 7mm in width, and 2mm in thickness. It has a pinched, metal ferrule and a total brush length of just over 6.25 inches or 16 centimeters.

MAC 228 ($20) is a bit fluffier, and to that end, I think a better all-around brush in comparison as it can apply powder and cream equally well and still get into the nooks and crannies. Hakuhodo G5513 ($16) has a straighter edge across the top (not as dome-shaped) but is similar in shape and use. Tom Ford Eyeliner & Definer ($50) is firmer.

Make Up For Ever #220 Small Shader Brush ($22.00) is described as a “small paddle brush.” It’s a small, flat, thin, dome-shaped brush–and yes, it is like a bigger version of the #208 mentioned above. It’s both wider and taller, though the #220 is actually even thinner. The bristles felt much finer and compacted together, which gave it a firmer, flatter shape overall. It had some flexibility but not too much. The firmness made it good for laying down creams, but for powders, it seemed a bit too stiff/flat and didn’t deposit color (from a powder eyeshadow) well. The brush head 7mm in length, 9mm in width, and 1.5mm in thickness. It had a pinched, metal ferrule and a total brush length of just over 6.25 inches or 16 centimeters.

I couldn’t think of anything similar that I’ve tried, as the size is larger than the ones I have that are at least similarly shaped (but they’re all smaller and mentioned in comparison to the #208). What I did notice with this brush was it always felt oily–no matter how many times I washed it or with what (from dishwashing soap to alcohol-based cleansers). It just has a slick, oily feel and as a result, it can be manipulated into whatever shape you want and then slowly releases back to its original shape. This oddity, which is not the first I’ve experienced with the brand’s new brushes (not all are like this but more than one) is quite curious.

The Glossover

product

#208 Small Precision Shader Brush

It was so-so for applying powder eyeshadow, but I felt like it wasn't picking up enough product, though it worked well for applying cream eyeshadow to the inner third of the lid as it fit well into that area.
Results
Loading ... Loading ...
Login or Register to be able to add this to your Vanity or Wishlist! Plus rate and review!
product

#220 Small Shader Brush

It's a small, flat, thin, dome-shaped brush--and yes, it is like a bigger version of the #208 mentioned above. It's both wider and taller, though the #220 is actually even thinner. The bristles felt much finer and compacted together, which gave it a firmer, flatter shape overall. It had some flexibility but not too much.
Results
Loading ... Loading ...

See more photos! Continue reading →

Saturday, September 14th, 2013

I love a good purple, but a good purple isn’t always easy to be found–especially in eyeliner or eyeshadow form, as they are often less pigmented, but these are all shades that are full of pigment!

  1. Illamasqua Jo’mina — a brightened, lavender purple with a cream finish for tips and toes
  2. Fyrinnae Parental Advisory — a rich, vibrant cool-toned purple with a frosted finish for eyes
  3. Milani Perfect Purple — a shimmery purple eyeliner that won’t let you down
  4. Make Up For Ever #92 — a bold purple with a matte finish — famous for a reason
  5. Zoya Suri — a metallic-shimmered violet purple for tips and toes

What’s the brightest/most vibrant purple you own?

Sunday, September 8th, 2013

Make Up For Ever #106 Medium Foundation Brush
Make Up For Ever #106 Medium Foundation Brush

Make Up For Ever #106 Medium Foundation Brush ($36.00) isa medium-sized, flat foundation brush with a slightly rounded edge. The brush head is 29mm in length, 26mm in width, and 5mm in thickness. The ferrule is pinched towards the top (near the brush head), and the handle is fairly thick (1.5 centimeters in diameter) towards the center and then narrows as it tapers to a slanted point. The total brush length is 6.75 inches or just over 17 centimeters. The weight is distributed more towards the brush head, so the handle does feel quite light.

It’s a thinner, firmer brush that is flexible as it is pressed and swept across the face, but it is not at all fluffy. The synthetic fibers pick up liquid and cream really well, but I do see noticeable brush strokes on the skin when I use this, so some buffing/blending is required with another brush after the initial lay down of product is done with this. I also noticed that there were four or five fibers that I had to trim back, because they were a half an inch or so extended beyond the brush’s actual shape. The brush is soft, and it didn’t turn greasy after several washes, and I had no real issues with it. There are a lot of flat foundation brushes on the market, and though I don’t have any in this exact shape, they all tend to apply similarly–somewhat streaky but can lay down more coverage (like MAC 190).

#156 Flat Round Blush Brush ($55.00) is a flat, fluffy blush brush with a domed, rounded edge. It’s not too dense, but it has enough fibers to not feel sparse. The brush head is 35mm in length, 35mm in width (at its widest point), and 15mm in thickness (at its thickest point). It has an pinched ferrule and a moderately wide handle (just under 1.5 centimeters in diameter) towards the center that narrows and tapers to a slanted point.  This brush had nice weight distribution.

It’s soft enough not to feel rough or scratchy against my skin, but I noticed it was less soft compared to other Make Up For Ever brushes. It doesn’t grab onto powders particularly well, so it ends up with a very soft, light application of powder blushes and bronzers. If you prefer a lighter application, you may enjoy this brush or want to look for a synthetic blush brush as synthetic brushes tend to pick up less powder than natural fiber brushes. I noticed that this brush lost a lot of its shape after a few washes and seemed more flared with some bristles splayed oddly.  Shu Uemura’s #20 Brush is similar–a touch longer in length with less flare and is slightly denser. Hakuhodo G5545 has a more rounded edge and is just a few millimeters longer. MAC 116 is much thicker, so it’s not much of a flat brush, while Sephora PRO Precision Blush (73) is also thicker and has a more tapered edge.

#176 Medium Concealer Brush ($30.00) is a small-medium, firm, flat brush designed to be used for concealer on larger areas. The brush head is 23mm in length, 17mm in width, and 4mm in thickness. It has a pinched ferrule, and a total handle length of 7 inches or just under 18 centimeters.  The weight distribution was nice–not too heavy at the brush head.

Make Up For Ever recommends using it with liquid and creams (like concealer), which is what I would use it for. If you like firm, flat brushes for applying foundation but find many of them too large, you may prefer the smaller shape of this one. I think it performs similar–it’s nice for laying down product initially, but for spreading and blending, it leaves streaks behind that need to be fixed with another brush. MAC 192 is thicker and longer. OCC’s Concealer (003) Brush is longer and more tapered.

The Glossover

product

#106 Medium Foundation Brush

It's a thinner, firmer brush that is flexible as it is pressed and swept across the face, but it is not at all fluffy. The synthetic fibers pick up liquid and cream really well, but I do see noticeable brush strokes on the skin when I use this, so some buffing/blending is required with another brush after the initial lay down of product is done with this.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...
Login or Register to be able to add this to your Vanity or Wishlist! Plus rate and review!
P
product

#156 Large Flat Blush Brush

It's soft enough not to feel rough or scratchy against my skin, but I noticed it was less soft compared to other Make Up For Ever brushes. It doesn't grab onto powders particularly well, so it ends up with a very soft, light application of powder blushes and bronzers.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...
product

#176 Medium Concealer Brush

If you like firm, flat brushes for applying foundation but find many of them too large, you may prefer the smaller shape of this one. I think it performs similar--it's nice for laying down product initially, but for spreading and blending, it leaves streaks behind that need to be fixed with another brush.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...

See more photos! Continue reading →

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Make Up For Ever #110 Medium Foundation Kabuki Brush
Make Up For Ever #110 Medium Foundation Kabuki Brush

Make Up For Ever #110 Medium Foundation Kabuki Brush ($48.00) is a tapered kabuki brush, and the tapered edge definitely separates it from my other kabuki brushes. The brush head measures 40mm in length, 30mm in width, and 30mm in thickness. It has a short handle (as you’d expect for a kabuki) with a total brush length of 3 inches or 7.5 centimeters.

The brush is incredibly dense, soft and silky against the skin, but it’s flexible enough to easily allow the tapered edge to curve around the nose and underneath the eye. Make Up For Ever recommends this for cream and liquid foundations, first and foremost, though it is also recommended for loose and pressed powders. I liked it best with liquid foundation, and it does tend to apply with heavier coverage, so if you tend to prefer a very sheer or light foundation application, it won’t be a go-to for you. I also used it to blend out edges of powder blush/bronzer, and it works, but I’m more inclined to reach for a buffer brush (like the #126 below) for that.

Make Up For Ever has five kabuki brushes in their range; the #102 is a smaller version of the #110, while the #124 has the more traditional dome-shape. There is also the #132, which is a flattened version, and the #414, which is a body brush. If you actually wanted to really buff and blend using the top of the brush, I would steer you away from this, as the tapered tip is tapered and firm enough that it works better for sweeping at an angle, not straight-on like many kabuki brushes are used.

#126 Medium Powder Brush ($55.00) is a large, dense, dome-shaped brush designed to be used for loose and pressed powder application with “moderate-to-high coverage.” It’s incredibly dense, thick, and very lush. The brush fibers are soft, silky, and glide across the skin almost as if they were one. The brush head is 40mm long, 40mm wide, and 40mm thick. The weight is more concentrated towards the brush head, and I would have preferred a better weight distribution to give the handle more heft. The handle is particular thick–about 3/4 of an inch in diameter at its thickest point. The total length of the brush is just over 7 inches or 18 centimeters. The ferrule is particularly long, even for a face brush, and is an open/round ferrule (no pinching).

This brush actually reminded me of a kabuki or buffer brush–in fact, the shape and size of MAC 182 is almost a dead-ringer, except for the handle. If you’ve always loved the shape of a kabuki brush but wanted a longer handle, this brush will definitely give you that. I loved it for blending and buffing out powder blush and bronzer, and it also worked for applying loose powder all-over. It tends to pick up powder a bit more than a fluffier brush, so for setting and finishing powders, I think it ends up yielding a too powdery finish. For powder foundation, though, it works to give light to medium coverage fairly easily.

One downside to both of these was that they take forever to dry (at least a full 24 hours) if you’ve done a full wash of them. On the plus side, I really didn’t feel like I had much in the way of similar brushes in my stash. The tapered shape of the #110 definitely makes it more unique compared to other kabuki brushes, while the fullness and denseness of the #126 make it different from other long-handled powder brushes I have (which tend to be less dense and fluffier), but it is comparable to the more traditional kabuki brush shape and density.

The Glossover

product

#110 Medium Foundation Kabuki Brush

The brush is incredibly dense, soft and silky against the skin, but it's flexible enough to easily allow the tapered edge to curve around the nose and underneath the eye. Make Up For Ever recommends this for cream and liquid foundations, first and foremost, though it is also recommended for loose and pressed powders.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...
Login or Register to be able to add this to your Vanity or Wishlist! Plus rate and review!
product

#126 Medium Powder Brush

It's incredibly dense, thick, and very lush. The brush fibers are soft, silky, and glide across the skin almost as if they were one. If you've always loved the shape of a kabuki brush but wanted a longer handle, this brush will definitely give you that.

Results
Loading ... Loading ...

See more photos! Continue reading →